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NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 31, 1999
ATLANTA -- People in the elite enclave of Buckhead picked up their routines yesterday, shaken and angry on the day after a gunman terrorized two offices on a rampage through their booming stretch of tinted glass buildings.How could it happen in Buckhead, the wealthy section of Atlanta immortalized in Tom Wolfe's latest novel, "A Man in Full," as the home of the masters of the New South, a place where sleek business towers give way to houses with lushly landscaped lawns?What surprises -- and saddens -- people here is that they aren't more surprised.
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NEWS
By Clarence Page | September 23, 2004
WASHINGTON - A right-wing radio talk-show host reminiscing about the old days in filmmaker John Sayles' new movie, Silver City, rails against Jane Fonda for a moment, then pauses to admit, "Gawd, how I miss her!" That's how I figure a lot of right-wingers feel about CBS anchor Dan Rather, now that he has admitted, after two stormy weeks, that his network could not authenticate four documents that it used to raise new questions about President Bush's Air National Guard service. A lot of Mr. Rather's critics on the right say they want him to go, but they really want him to stay.
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NEWS
By John Johnson and John Johnson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 27, 2003
ATLANTA - Faced with a stagnating economy in this city's northern area two decades ago, local officials decided to jump-start commercial activity by relaxing rules that required bars and dance clubs to provide parking for customers. The plan worked. A thriving nightlife emerged in the once-sedate Buckhead area of Atlanta. Dozens of bars and restaurants opened along and around Peachtree Road, attracting a multiracial crowd of young people and helping cement Atlanta's reputation as not only an intellectual center of the New South but a swinging place too. Now, however, after a string of high-profile scandals and killings - a recent shooting left the former bodyguard of rap magnate Sean "P. Diddy" Combs dead in the street - the city is thinking seriously of reining in the Mardi Gras atmosphere.
NEWS
By John Johnson and John Johnson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 27, 2003
ATLANTA - Faced with a stagnating economy in this city's northern area two decades ago, local officials decided to jump-start commercial activity by relaxing rules that required bars and dance clubs to provide parking for customers. The plan worked. A thriving nightlife emerged in the once-sedate Buckhead area of Atlanta. Dozens of bars and restaurants opened along and around Peachtree Road, attracting a multiracial crowd of young people and helping cement Atlanta's reputation as not only an intellectual center of the New South but a swinging place too. Now, however, after a string of high-profile scandals and killings - a recent shooting left the former bodyguard of rap magnate Sean "P. Diddy" Combs dead in the street - the city is thinking seriously of reining in the Mardi Gras atmosphere.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Huler and Scott Huler,Special to the Sun | February 27, 2000
ATLANTA -- Suggested new slogan: "The Cobalt Lounge -- Where we almost completely guarantee that you will not be stabbed or shot or roughed up by NFL players or anyone else either." OK, maybe that doesn't quite get the job done, but it brings up a point. What do you do when you're a relatively new nightclub and you achieve sudden national renown -- for all the wrong reasons? Say, if someone, probably one of your patrons, kills two other patrons in the street, and right after that a star NFL linebacker and part of the still-roiling crowd bundle into a stretch limousine the size of a missile silo that screeches off in a hail of gunfire?
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 2, 2000
ATLANTA - Bruce Harvey, the pony-tailed and tattooed showboat who serves as defense attorney for one of Ray Lewis's co-defendants, was about to wrap up his cross-examination of Evelyn Sparks, the young and smartly dressed Chicago woman who was in Lewis's rented limousine the morning of the Buckhead murders. In fact, Harvey, who resembles the actor Stanley Tucci, had just one more question for Sparks: "My wife wants to know what kind of shoes you're wearing." Immediately four things happened - some spectators in the courtroom laughed, a couple of jurors smiled, Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard stood to object to the flippant question, and four women seated just behind him grimaced and gasped with disgust.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | September 23, 2004
WASHINGTON - A right-wing radio talk-show host reminiscing about the old days in filmmaker John Sayles' new movie, Silver City, rails against Jane Fonda for a moment, then pauses to admit, "Gawd, how I miss her!" That's how I figure a lot of right-wingers feel about CBS anchor Dan Rather, now that he has admitted, after two stormy weeks, that his network could not authenticate four documents that it used to raise new questions about President Bush's Air National Guard service. A lot of Mr. Rather's critics on the right say they want him to go, but they really want him to stay.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 30, 1999
ATLANTA -- A securities day trader killed nine people yesterday afternoon in two office buildings in the city's upscale Buckhead district, eluded an extensive police manhunt for five hours, then killed himself in his van after the police pulled him over in nearby Cobb County.Twelve other people were injured in the incidents, seven of them from gunshot wounds.The man, Mark O. Barton, 44, also is suspected in the killings of his wife and two children from an earlier marriage, whose bodies were found yesterday in an apartment in suburban Stockbridge, about 15 miles southeast of Atlanta.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Peter Hermann and Ann LoLordo and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2000
ATLANTA -- At the Cobalt Lounge, Ray Lewis celebrated Super Bowl Sunday in a style befitting the millionaire athlete. He stepped from a super stretch limousine in a mink coat, a high school buddy at one elbow, women at another. The retro-chic club in the trendy Buckhead area of Atlanta was packed with patrons who gladly paid $100 to mingle in a bar that caters to the likes of Wayne Gretzky, Leonardo DiCaprio and Michael Jordan. The Ravens' star linebacker joined other celebrities in a VIP suite.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | May 31, 2000
RAY LEWIS was tight-lipped, uttering not a word, when a reporter asked him how he felt about prosecutors in what Atlantans call "the Buckhead murders" getting their butts handed to them before the defense had even presented its case. The Baltimore Ravens All-Pro linebacker -- on trial with two of his friends in the Jan. 31 killings of two men in Atlanta's Buckhead district -- was perhaps right to be cautious. A judge slapped a gag order on attorneys and defendants in February, and Lewis might be a bit leery of trusting the media just now. If the news reports of what went on in Room 1B of the Fulton County Courthouse May 24 are any indication, Lewis' mistrust is justified.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 2, 2000
ATLANTA - Bruce Harvey, the pony-tailed and tattooed showboat who serves as defense attorney for one of Ray Lewis's co-defendants, was about to wrap up his cross-examination of Evelyn Sparks, the young and smartly dressed Chicago woman who was in Lewis's rented limousine the morning of the Buckhead murders. In fact, Harvey, who resembles the actor Stanley Tucci, had just one more question for Sparks: "My wife wants to know what kind of shoes you're wearing." Immediately four things happened - some spectators in the courtroom laughed, a couple of jurors smiled, Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard stood to object to the flippant question, and four women seated just behind him grimaced and gasped with disgust.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | May 31, 2000
RAY LEWIS was tight-lipped, uttering not a word, when a reporter asked him how he felt about prosecutors in what Atlantans call "the Buckhead murders" getting their butts handed to them before the defense had even presented its case. The Baltimore Ravens All-Pro linebacker -- on trial with two of his friends in the Jan. 31 killings of two men in Atlanta's Buckhead district -- was perhaps right to be cautious. A judge slapped a gag order on attorneys and defendants in February, and Lewis might be a bit leery of trusting the media just now. If the news reports of what went on in Room 1B of the Fulton County Courthouse May 24 are any indication, Lewis' mistrust is justified.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Huler and Scott Huler,Special to the Sun | February 27, 2000
ATLANTA -- Suggested new slogan: "The Cobalt Lounge -- Where we almost completely guarantee that you will not be stabbed or shot or roughed up by NFL players or anyone else either." OK, maybe that doesn't quite get the job done, but it brings up a point. What do you do when you're a relatively new nightclub and you achieve sudden national renown -- for all the wrong reasons? Say, if someone, probably one of your patrons, kills two other patrons in the street, and right after that a star NFL linebacker and part of the still-roiling crowd bundle into a stretch limousine the size of a missile silo that screeches off in a hail of gunfire?
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Peter Hermann and Ann LoLordo and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2000
ATLANTA -- At the Cobalt Lounge, Ray Lewis celebrated Super Bowl Sunday in a style befitting the millionaire athlete. He stepped from a super stretch limousine in a mink coat, a high school buddy at one elbow, women at another. The retro-chic club in the trendy Buckhead area of Atlanta was packed with patrons who gladly paid $100 to mingle in a bar that caters to the likes of Wayne Gretzky, Leonardo DiCaprio and Michael Jordan. The Ravens' star linebacker joined other celebrities in a VIP suite.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 31, 1999
ATLANTA -- People in the elite enclave of Buckhead picked up their routines yesterday, shaken and angry on the day after a gunman terrorized two offices on a rampage through their booming stretch of tinted glass buildings.How could it happen in Buckhead, the wealthy section of Atlanta immortalized in Tom Wolfe's latest novel, "A Man in Full," as the home of the masters of the New South, a place where sleek business towers give way to houses with lushly landscaped lawns?What surprises -- and saddens -- people here is that they aren't more surprised.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 30, 1999
ATLANTA -- A securities day trader killed nine people yesterday afternoon in two office buildings in the city's upscale Buckhead district, eluded an extensive police manhunt for five hours, then killed himself in his van after the police pulled him over in nearby Cobb County.Twelve other people were injured in the incidents, seven of them from gunshot wounds.The man, Mark O. Barton, 44, also is suspected in the killings of his wife and two children from an earlier marriage, whose bodies were found yesterday in an apartment in suburban Stockbridge, about 15 miles southeast of Atlanta.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 19, 1994
I went to Atlanta recently and ate pork chops from heaven, grits fixed six ways to Sunday, and every piece of pie that sashayed within range of my fork.Eating most of it made me feel happy to be alive. People in other parts of the country may view a meal as an opportunity to prove you are nutritionally correct, morally superior, and in command of the latest arcane "what-might-kill-you" study.In the South it is still OK to eat because it gives you pleasure. I say this after spending four days in Atlanta at the annual conference of the Association of Food Journalists.
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