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By GILBERT SANDLER | January 26, 1993
WON'T you tr-y-y-y Wheaties,Jack Armstrong never tires of it and neither will you.Radio station WITH will soon abandon its present big-band, golden oldies format in favor of what is loosely called children's programming.Sad as it is to learn of the disappearance from local airwaves of this rich and nostalgic musical fare, if the new format manages to engage children in the imaginative experience ("theater of the mind") of radio at its best, something good may yet result. And old-timers will remember their childhood days around the radio afternoons and Saturday mornings.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
Lost City Diner is open again. When Lost City Diner opened, suddenly, in August 2010, it was a surprising twist in a long-running story that played out for years on the corner of Charles and Lanvale, a half block up from the Club Charles. A diner was always coming, and it never came. And then it did. The brainchild of Club Charles owner Joy Martin, Lost City Diner was beautiful, with antique fixtures and fanciful retro-industrial elements evoking the giddy atmosphere of a Buck Rogers serial from the 1930s.  Then, in February 2012, just as suddenly as it opened, the Lost City Diner closed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
Lost City Diner is open again. When Lost City Diner opened, suddenly, in August 2010, it was a surprising twist in a long-running story that played out for years on the corner of Charles and Lanvale, a half block up from the Club Charles. A diner was always coming, and it never came. And then it did. The brainchild of Club Charles owner Joy Martin, Lost City Diner was beautiful, with antique fixtures and fanciful retro-industrial elements evoking the giddy atmosphere of a Buck Rogers serial from the 1930s.  Then, in February 2012, just as suddenly as it opened, the Lost City Diner closed.
NEWS
July 8, 2011
I find the outlook for NASA over the next decade by Waleed Abdalati and Robert Braun to be very narrow minded, self-serving and steeped in false hope ("After space shuttle program, NASA's future still bright," July 4). I can see how as NASA's chief technologist and chief scientist, they would welcome an increase in funding in their respective areas, but they must face reality. In this unsettled budgetary environment, unfocused investments in science and technology are ripe for cuts and outright deletion.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 11, 2000
"Violet," a small-scale musical about inner beauty, is receiving a stirring, sensitive mid-Atlantic premiere at AXIS Theatre. The show has a number of things going for it: A rich gospel/country-influenced score (music by Jeanine Tesori, lyrics by Brian Crawley, who also wrote the book), the emotional pull of a romantic triangle and the innate theatricality of the subject of televangelism. And from the rousingly sung opening number to the tender closing kiss, stage director Brian Klaas and musical director Steven Zumbrun make the most of the show's assets.
NEWS
February 13, 2004
SOME PEOPLE own a Pinto but foolishly aspire to a Bentley. So they dress up the family sedan with all kinds of bells and whistles. It might have only four cylinders and it might backfire, but darn if it won't have a custom paint job, DVD and CD players, a couple of fancy floor mats and some chrome wheel covers. The Maryland Transit Administration may soon turn Baltimore's bus system into something similar. When they're performing at their peak, MTA buses work just fine, thank you. They can get people from one place to another.
NEWS
July 8, 2011
I find the outlook for NASA over the next decade by Waleed Abdalati and Robert Braun to be very narrow minded, self-serving and steeped in false hope ("After space shuttle program, NASA's future still bright," July 4). I can see how as NASA's chief technologist and chief scientist, they would welcome an increase in funding in their respective areas, but they must face reality. In this unsettled budgetary environment, unfocused investments in science and technology are ripe for cuts and outright deletion.
BUSINESS
By Fort Worth Star-Telegram | July 27, 1992
FORT WORTH, Texas -- To catch a glimpse of the future of computing, you may have to go to Tycoon World.This computerized game developed by Tandy Corp. allows you to do more than just zap electronic aliens or destroy animated cartoon characters.In the Tycoon World prototype, players can use a computer to view film clips, identify pictures, listen to audio commands and even roll electronic dice.Although Tycoon World is experimental, the system used to create the game represents one of the investments Fort Worth's Tandy is making to shape home and business computing.
FEATURES
By Orlando Sentinel | September 18, 1992
In the next month, cable satellites will welcome aboard some of television's oldest friends: Beaming down to living rooms across the nation will be such otherworldly company as Buck Rogers and Bugs Bunny, Dr. Who and Daffy Duck, Capt. James T. Kirk and Kwicky Koala.The long-in-the-making Sci-Fi Channel debuts Thursday. A week later, on Oct. 1, Turner Broadcasting introduces the "Toon Age" with its launch of the Cartoon Network.Between the widespread channel capacity crunch and a confusing legislative environment, there will be many cable operators postponing decisions to pick up new programming, said Larry Gerbrandt, an analyst with Paul Kagan Associates, a Carmel, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick | August 27, 2012
Lost City Diner, whose lavish pop decor was inspired by high-adventure cliffhangers like the ones with Buck Rogers, was last seen ... hanging off a cliff. The fountain shop materialized out of nowhere in August 2011 only to close, suddenly, in February of this year. At the time, owner Joy Martin promised that Lost City Diner would return. Martin said she was closing Lost City Diner for some kitchen renovations. • Inside the Lost City Diner [Pictures] It looks it will be. Two new signs have popped up in the restaurant's Charles Street windows -- "Lost City Diner, Fall 2012.
NEWS
February 13, 2004
SOME PEOPLE own a Pinto but foolishly aspire to a Bentley. So they dress up the family sedan with all kinds of bells and whistles. It might have only four cylinders and it might backfire, but darn if it won't have a custom paint job, DVD and CD players, a couple of fancy floor mats and some chrome wheel covers. The Maryland Transit Administration may soon turn Baltimore's bus system into something similar. When they're performing at their peak, MTA buses work just fine, thank you. They can get people from one place to another.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 11, 2000
"Violet," a small-scale musical about inner beauty, is receiving a stirring, sensitive mid-Atlantic premiere at AXIS Theatre. The show has a number of things going for it: A rich gospel/country-influenced score (music by Jeanine Tesori, lyrics by Brian Crawley, who also wrote the book), the emotional pull of a romantic triangle and the innate theatricality of the subject of televangelism. And from the rousingly sung opening number to the tender closing kiss, stage director Brian Klaas and musical director Steven Zumbrun make the most of the show's assets.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | January 26, 1993
WON'T you tr-y-y-y Wheaties,Jack Armstrong never tires of it and neither will you.Radio station WITH will soon abandon its present big-band, golden oldies format in favor of what is loosely called children's programming.Sad as it is to learn of the disappearance from local airwaves of this rich and nostalgic musical fare, if the new format manages to engage children in the imaginative experience ("theater of the mind") of radio at its best, something good may yet result. And old-timers will remember their childhood days around the radio afternoons and Saturday mornings.
BUSINESS
By Fort Worth Star-Telegram | July 27, 1992
FORT WORTH, Texas -- To catch a glimpse of the future of computing, you may have to go to Tycoon World.This computerized game developed by Tandy Corp. allows you to do more than just zap electronic aliens or destroy animated cartoon characters.In the Tycoon World prototype, players can use a computer to view film clips, identify pictures, listen to audio commands and even roll electronic dice.Although Tycoon World is experimental, the system used to create the game represents one of the investments Fort Worth's Tandy is making to shape home and business computing.
NEWS
By Wiley A. Hall III | June 28, 1992
BLACK EMPIRE.George S. Schuyler.Northeastern University.347 pages. $19.95. A young reporter sits at a table in a Harlem restaurant, surreptitiously watching a couple at a nearby table.The woman is "a charming, young, blonde white girl swathed in a gorgeous fur coat." The man is a "very tall, stern-visaged black man dressed entirely in dark gray and carrying a gold-handled cane in his gloved hand."The woman is pleading with the man. The man listens impassively.At last he says, in a voice "cultured, but deep and cruel": "So you have failed.
NEWS
October 5, 2006
Tamara Dobson, the Baltimore-born model-turned-actress best known for her leading role in two films as kung fu-fighting government super-agent Cleopatra Jones, died Monday at Keswick Multi-Care Center from complications of pneumonia and multiple sclerosis. She was 59. One of four children of a beauty shop operator and railroad clerk, Miss Dobson was a graduate of Western High School.
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