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NEWS
December 30, 1993
Energy Secretary Hazel R. O'Leary, speaking with the advantage of hindsight, says "the only thing I could think of was Nazi Germany." Dr. Joseph G. Hamilton, a radiation biologist speaking in 1950 at the height of Cold War fear and frenzy, warned a superior that government medical experiments then being conducted "might have a little of the Buchenwald touch."It is always dangerous to make comparisons with the Holocaust, unprecedented example of government policy and power being applied to the deliberate extermination of human beings despised by the Hitler regime.
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NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 12, 2010
Frank Warner Kussy, a Holocaust survivor who won reparations for damages done to him and his business by both the Nazis and the communist government of East Germany, died of heart failure Oct. 1, less than two weeks short of his 100th birthday. "He was probably unique, in that he fought the German government double-time," said Kenneth Waltzer, director of Jewish Studies at James Madison College at Michigan State University in East Lansing, Mich., who invited Mr. Kussy to speak to his class several times.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 21, 1991
BUCHENWALD, Germany -- An angry debate over the meaning of German history has erupted at the site of the former Nazi concentration camp here.Few names conjure up such vivid visions of human cruelty as that of Buchenwald. Under Hitler, more than a quarter-million prisoners from three dozen countries were sent to work here as slave laborers. About 65,000 died.Today Buchenwald is open to the public, a stark memorial to victims of evil. Historians, archivists and other professionals who work here are charged with documenting an unspeakable truth and presenting it to visitors honestly and fairly.
NEWS
August 16, 2008
JAMES HOYT, 83 Concentration camp liberator James Hoyt, one of four U.S. soldiers who discovered Buchenwald concentration camp as World War II neared its end, died in his sleep Monday at his home in Oxford, Iowa, said his wife, Doris. The cause of death was not immediately determined. Mr. Hoyt served in the Army's 6th Armored Division during World War II, earning the Bronze Star. He fought in the Battle of the Bulge. Buchenwald, one of the largest concentration camps established by Nazi Germany, was liberated in April 1945.
NEWS
By James M. Kramon | August 17, 1997
A FEW months ago, I wrote a Perspective article about my stepfather's involvement in the liberation of Buchenwald concentration camp. The article ran on May 4 along with several photos taken by my stepfather, Maj. Irving A. Sarot, a U.S. Army doctor.I received numerous phone calls after the article appeared. The first was from a man who said he had served in the U.S. Army and entered Buchenwald three days after it was liberated. The ovens were still warm when my stepfather got to the camp.
NEWS
By James M. Kramon | May 4, 1997
TODAY is Yom Hashoah, the day set aside each year in the memory of the 6 million Jews killed by the Nazis during the Holocaust. n n n n nIt's been 52 years since the extermination camps were liberated in the spring of 1945 as the war in Europe was ending. Over the years, many witnesses to the Holocaust, including survivors and liberators of the camps, have died and the others are growing old. With each passing year, there are fewer people to give firsthand accounts of atrocities and fewer voices to counter the hate-mongers who say the Holocaust did not happen or the death count is exaggerated.
NEWS
December 14, 1998
William D. Denson, 85, who was chief prosecutor for the United States in Nazi war crimes trials in Dachau, Germany, died in his sleep yesterday at home in Lawrence, N.Y. He was chief prosecutor for atrocities committed in four concentration camps -- Dachau, Mauthausen, Flossenberg and Buchenwald.Pub Date: 12/14/98
NEWS
November 5, 2006
Former World War II soldier Sol Goldstein will talk about his experiences in the war as a concentration camp liberator at 2 p.m. today at the Aberdeen library branch, 21 Franklin St. Goldstein enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1942 and served in the European theater. He helped liberate the Buchenwald concentration camp, one of the largest established by the Nazis. Most of the early inmates at Buchenwald were political prisoners, but in 1938, almost 10,000 Jews were sent there. On April 11, 1945, American forces entered Buchenwald.
NEWS
August 16, 2008
JAMES HOYT, 83 Concentration camp liberator James Hoyt, one of four U.S. soldiers who discovered Buchenwald concentration camp as World War II neared its end, died in his sleep Monday at his home in Oxford, Iowa, said his wife, Doris. The cause of death was not immediately determined. Mr. Hoyt served in the Army's 6th Armored Division during World War II, earning the Bronze Star. He fought in the Battle of the Bulge. Buchenwald, one of the largest concentration camps established by Nazi Germany, was liberated in April 1945.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | March 10, 2006
Abraham "Al" Morrison, a World War II artilleryman who participated in the D-day invasion of France, helped liberate the Buchenwald concentration camp and was active with the Jewish War Veterans, died of cancer Monday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The longtime Lochearn resident was 83. Born in Baltimore and raised on Collington Avenue, Mr. Morrison cut short his public school education to help support his family. After enlisting in the Army in 1940, he trained as a paratrooper.
NEWS
November 5, 2006
Former World War II soldier Sol Goldstein will talk about his experiences in the war as a concentration camp liberator at 2 p.m. today at the Aberdeen library branch, 21 Franklin St. Goldstein enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1942 and served in the European theater. He helped liberate the Buchenwald concentration camp, one of the largest established by the Nazis. Most of the early inmates at Buchenwald were political prisoners, but in 1938, almost 10,000 Jews were sent there. On April 11, 1945, American forces entered Buchenwald.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | March 10, 2006
Abraham "Al" Morrison, a World War II artilleryman who participated in the D-day invasion of France, helped liberate the Buchenwald concentration camp and was active with the Jewish War Veterans, died of cancer Monday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The longtime Lochearn resident was 83. Born in Baltimore and raised on Collington Avenue, Mr. Morrison cut short his public school education to help support his family. After enlisting in the Army in 1940, he trained as a paratrooper.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2005
LAST WEEK, world leaders gathered at Auschwitz in Poland to commemorate the anniversary of Russian troops overrunning the Nazi death camp that has become identified as the inner-circle of the hell that is now known as the Holocaust. But 60 years ago, when the survivors of the deadliest of Nazi Germany's death camps were in their first days of freedom, few paid attention. In January 1945, it would be months before the world began to face the horrors of Nazi cruelty. That would come as the Americans and British came across camps like Buchenwald and Dachau, much less deadly places than Auschwitz.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | November 26, 2000
Through her work for the fledgling Fortune and Life magazines in the 1930s and '40s, Margaret Bourke-White became one of most influential figures of the golden age of American photojournalism. "Power and Paper: Margaret Bourke-White, Modernity and the Documentary Mode" is an exhibition of 82 photographs by the groundbreaking photojournalist, war correspondent and industrial and architectural photographer. The show is on display at the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and runs through Dec. 9. The UMBC show focuses on Bourke-White's photographs of the newsprint industry, which she began in the 1930s.
TOPIC
By Hans Knight | March 7, 1999
SIMON WIESENTHAL celebrated his 90th birthday recently, and if we are lucky, the old Nazi-hunter will be with us for some time to come. And as the gods draw up the tenants' list for this dwindling century's pantheon, I trust they will not omit his name. They might even get a chuckle out of it. "Wiesenthal" is translated as "Valley of the Meadows," which sings of gentle tranquillity hilariously out of harmony with the life and times of the man.Quite a bit of water has flowed down the Danube since I met him in his cluttered office in Vienna, but some things don't fade.
NEWS
December 14, 1998
William D. Denson, 85, who was chief prosecutor for the United States in Nazi war crimes trials in Dachau, Germany, died in his sleep yesterday at home in Lawrence, N.Y. He was chief prosecutor for atrocities committed in four concentration camps -- Dachau, Mauthausen, Flossenberg and Buchenwald.Pub Date: 12/14/98
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2005
LAST WEEK, world leaders gathered at Auschwitz in Poland to commemorate the anniversary of Russian troops overrunning the Nazi death camp that has become identified as the inner-circle of the hell that is now known as the Holocaust. But 60 years ago, when the survivors of the deadliest of Nazi Germany's death camps were in their first days of freedom, few paid attention. In January 1945, it would be months before the world began to face the horrors of Nazi cruelty. That would come as the Americans and British came across camps like Buchenwald and Dachau, much less deadly places than Auschwitz.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 29, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. government should compensate victims of radiation testing conducted as part of its Cold War nuclear program, Energy Secretary Hazel R. O'Leary said yesterday as disclosures mounted about extensive experiments involving humans as often-unwitting subjects."
NEWS
By James M. Kramon | August 17, 1997
A FEW months ago, I wrote a Perspective article about my stepfather's involvement in the liberation of Buchenwald concentration camp. The article ran on May 4 along with several photos taken by my stepfather, Maj. Irving A. Sarot, a U.S. Army doctor.I received numerous phone calls after the article appeared. The first was from a man who said he had served in the U.S. Army and entered Buchenwald three days after it was liberated. The ovens were still warm when my stepfather got to the camp.
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