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By Marc Ballon and Marc Ballon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 21, 1995
BUCHAREST, Romania -- At the old Communist Party Central Committee building, on the snowy nights of December, the ghost of the late dictator is almost palpable.The large, stolid building remains much as it was on Dec. 21, 1989, the day a bewildered Nicolae Ceausescu spoke from a balcony and was shouted down by the crowd filling Palace Square. The Romanian revolution had thus begun. Ceausescu and his wife, Elena, would be executed on Christmas Day. Another 1,200 people would die in a week of street battles with the Securitate, the secret police.
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NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 22, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Less than two years after being appointed ambassador to Romania, former Maryland Del. James C. Rosapepe is the focus of an internal, highly negative State Department report on the Bucharest embassy.Among the report's conclusions: Under Rosapepe's tenure embassy morale has plunged; the State Department has received "inadequate" information on Romanian affairs; Romanian nationals are sometimes used as "private advisers" to the exclusion of U.S. staffers; and communications with Washington are often "tilted towards the Romanian perspective."
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NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 22, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Less than two years after being appointed ambassador to Romania, former Maryland Del. James C. Rosapepe is the focus of an internal, highly negative State Department report on the Bucharest embassy.Among the report's conclusions: Under Rosapepe's tenure embassy morale has plunged; the State Department has received "inadequate" information on Romanian affairs; Romanian nationals are sometimes used as "private advisers" to the exclusion of U.S. staffers; and communications with Washington are often "tilted towards the Romanian perspective."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 10, 1999
BUCHAREST, Romania -- As Pope John Paul II prayed at an open-air Orthodox Mass yesterday at the side of Patriarch Teoctist, Cristian Andrei, 40, examined the historic moment from mammon's perspective."
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | November 4, 1993
BUCHAREST, Romania -- Dan lives in a tunnel beneath a manhole cover on the edge of Bucharest's Gara de Nord railway station. It's a hellish, stifling and dirty space where warm pipes hiss and rats scuttle by. The stench is overwhelming.He shares the space with three other ragged boys, all in their mid-teens. They have spread torn cardboard boxes on the floor. They are grateful to have this warm place for the coming winter. In other tunnels, children have even managed to rig up electricity for makeshift lights.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 10, 1999
BUCHAREST, Romania -- As Pope John Paul II prayed at an open-air Orthodox Mass yesterday at the side of Patriarch Teoctist, Cristian Andrei, 40, examined the historic moment from mammon's perspective."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 7, 1990
BUCHAREST, Romania -- In the dark, dreary terrain of Romania's impoverished economy, Anda Baldau, a secretary turned shop owner, and Petru Rares, a Western-educated economist turned technocrat, are two bright spots.While the economy continues to stumble because of the difficulties in breaking free of communism, it is people like Mrs. Baldau, who runs one of Bucharest's few private shops, and Mr. Rares, deputy director of an office to attract foreign investment, who are helping lift Romania back to its feet.
NEWS
By Toby Smith and Toby Smith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 11, 1999
PIANU DE JOS, Romania -- Holding a 7-iron on a pretty hilltop in a remote part of Transylvania, Paul Tomita takes a couple of easy practice swings.Eighty yards away stands a rippling flag. Fifty yards away stand some grazing sheep. "They're here to cut the grass," explains Tomita. "And to provide the fertilizer."Golf in Romania may sound a bit like polo in Rwanda. Even Tomita, a stout 84-year-old Romanian, with a white mustache and a black pipe stuck in his mouth, acknowledges the incongruity.
NEWS
By TOBY SMITH and TOBY SMITH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 23, 1999
BUCHAREST, Romania -- One way to find out what people are thinking is to visit the dead.At Ghencea Civil Cemetery, in the southeastern corner of the capital, dozens of Romanians each day pause and pay their respects at the grave of the longtime Communist tyrant Nicolae Ceausescu."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 3, 1996
BUCHAREST, Romania -- After seven years as president, Ion Iliescu of Romania is up for re-election today and, according to polls, is likely to win a third term, even though he has preserved many elements of Romania's Communist past.How Iliescu has been able to hold on to power in the face of a precipitous drop in living standards is a puzzle.He has shown little of the flexibility of other former Communists, such as Prime Minister Gyula Horn in Hungary, or President Aleksander Kwasniewski in Poland.
NEWS
By TOBY SMITH and TOBY SMITH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 23, 1999
BUCHAREST, Romania -- One way to find out what people are thinking is to visit the dead.At Ghencea Civil Cemetery, in the southeastern corner of the capital, dozens of Romanians each day pause and pay their respects at the grave of the longtime Communist tyrant Nicolae Ceausescu."
NEWS
By Toby Smith and Toby Smith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 11, 1999
PIANU DE JOS, Romania -- Holding a 7-iron on a pretty hilltop in a remote part of Transylvania, Paul Tomita takes a couple of easy practice swings.Eighty yards away stands a rippling flag. Fifty yards away stand some grazing sheep. "They're here to cut the grass," explains Tomita. "And to provide the fertilizer."Golf in Romania may sound a bit like polo in Rwanda. Even Tomita, a stout 84-year-old Romanian, with a white mustache and a black pipe stuck in his mouth, acknowledges the incongruity.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 3, 1996
BUCHAREST, Romania -- After seven years as president, Ion Iliescu of Romania is up for re-election today and, according to polls, is likely to win a third term, even though he has preserved many elements of Romania's Communist past.How Iliescu has been able to hold on to power in the face of a precipitous drop in living standards is a puzzle.He has shown little of the flexibility of other former Communists, such as Prime Minister Gyula Horn in Hungary, or President Aleksander Kwasniewski in Poland.
NEWS
By Marc Ballon and Marc Ballon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 21, 1995
BUCHAREST, Romania -- At the old Communist Party Central Committee building, on the snowy nights of December, the ghost of the late dictator is almost palpable.The large, stolid building remains much as it was on Dec. 21, 1989, the day a bewildered Nicolae Ceausescu spoke from a balcony and was shouted down by the crowd filling Palace Square. The Romanian revolution had thus begun. Ceausescu and his wife, Elena, would be executed on Christmas Day. Another 1,200 people would die in a week of street battles with the Securitate, the secret police.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | November 4, 1993
BUCHAREST, Romania -- Dan lives in a tunnel beneath a manhole cover on the edge of Bucharest's Gara de Nord railway station. It's a hellish, stifling and dirty space where warm pipes hiss and rats scuttle by. The stench is overwhelming.He shares the space with three other ragged boys, all in their mid-teens. They have spread torn cardboard boxes on the floor. They are grateful to have this warm place for the coming winter. In other tunnels, children have even managed to rig up electricity for makeshift lights.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 7, 1990
BUCHAREST, Romania -- In the dark, dreary terrain of Romania's impoverished economy, Anda Baldau, a secretary turned shop owner, and Petru Rares, a Western-educated economist turned technocrat, are two bright spots.While the economy continues to stumble because of the difficulties in breaking free of communism, it is people like Mrs. Baldau, who runs one of Bucharest's few private shops, and Mr. Rares, deputy director of an office to attract foreign investment, who are helping lift Romania back to its feet.
EXPLORE
June 22, 2011
Susan and Dragos Tudor , of Mount Airy, announce the birth of their son, Landon Gheorghe Tudor , on April 27, 2011, at 12:51 p.m. He weighed 9 pounds. His brother is Aiden. His grandparents are John and Joan Green, of Ellicott City; and Ion and Aurelia Tudor, of Bucharest, Romania.
NEWS
March 28, 1999
Lawrence "Dan" Duke Sr.,86, former chief judge of the State Court of Fulton County, Ga., who once waved a whip in the face of former Gov. Eugene Talmadge to prove a point about racism, died of pneumonia Wednesday. Judge Duke was known for his work defending blacks and prosecuting those who carried out racially charged crimes and for his 1941 confrontation with Talmadge.As an assistant solicitor for the state, Judge Duke won the conviction of several members of the Ku Klux Klan for the flogging death of a black man. After Talmadge threatened to grant the men clemency, Judge Duke waved the whips used in the crime in the governor's face.
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