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By Frederick N. Rasmussen | July 3, 1999
150 years ago in The SunJuly 6: The seventy-third anniversary of the national birth-day of our Independence passed off very quietly so far as Baltimore was concerned. The city scarcely ever presented a more quiet appearance. Nearly all the places of public business were closed, and by nine o'clock the streets appeared to be almost deserted.100 years ago in The SunJuly 5: TWAS A GREAT FOURTH -- The glorious Fourth of July, more glorious since Admiral's Schley's victory over the Spanish fleet on the third of July of last year, was duly celebrated in Baltimore yesterday.
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By Katie Mercado, For The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2013
I can't believe I'm actually at this point. I mean I know it's wedding shower season, but for it to be my wedding shower was an eye opener to how close we actually are to my May 25 wedding. My surprise shower was lovely! I had a hunch when it would be, so I came dressed appropriately (which I was very happy about later since it allowed for some great photos). The evening, themed “Nacho Average Bridal Shower,” was complete with a nacho/fajita bar, sangria, margaritas and a sombrero.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,Evening Sun Staff | December 24, 1991
It's called the Great American Flea Market, but it has become a battleground over food licenses, baseball cards and bubble gum.On Dec. 15, Linda McIver, a Baltimore Health Department inspector, responded to a complaint about the flea market inside the Mount Clare Junction Shopping Center in southwest Baltimore.F: The complaint, apparently from a rival merchant at themall, was that some vendors at the flea market were selling food items without a city license.By the time McIver left the shopping center, six vendors had been cited for not complying with an article of the city code, officials said.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2005
WASHINGTON - This is what it felt like on the floor of the 9:30 Club in the moments before the Backstreet Boys made their triumphant return: A deep rumbling noise shook the walls. Blue lights swept the crowd. Cymbals clashed. The smoke machines went into overdrive. And then it happened: Nick, Kevin, Howie, Brian and A.J. raced onstage in white jackets, white hats and white sneakers. A thousand voices shrieked and a thousand digital cameras were lifted into the air. The Backstreet Boys were back.
FEATURES
By Susan Baer | September 12, 1990
Washington OK, here's the final offer: David E. Price, D-N.C. John Paul Hammerschmidt, R-Ark., and a Snickers bar for Joseph P. Kennedy II, D-Mass. Deal?Welcome to the heady, high stakes world of bubble gum trading cards -- Capitol style.Instead of sports figures, these "American Leader Cards" feature the proud, smiling faces of members of Congress, complete with such facts and figures as committees, last election results, previous offices and biographical information.Jim Warlick, owner of several political memorabilia shops in Washington, came up with the cards as a way to interest young people in politics.
FEATURES
November 18, 1999
Backstreet joysWhat was the coolest thing about the Backstreet Boys' Millennium Tour? Oh, please, it's just too hard to pick one thing! Here are my picks for the best and worst parts of the Boys' show in Chicago.BEST SPECIAL EFFECT: The guys coming in the arena on lighted skateboards, floating through the air.WORST COSTUME: Puffy body armor that made them look like the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. The best? The black leather outfits. Oooh-eee! Hot stuff.BIGGEST SCREAM-GETTER: Nick, closely followed by Brian and A.J. Kevin was pretty popular, too, but the roadies checking equipment before the show got more screams than Howie D.STRANGEST MOMENT: Each Boy brought one girl and her mom onstage for "The Perfect Fan."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | August 14, 1994
Children, put on your walking shoes and grab your gum. You, too, can follow the Bubble Gum Tour to local sites selected for the younger set by a Westminster teen-ager."
FEATURES
By Casi Clocker and Casi Clocker,Staff Writer | July 15, 1992
They make eyes pop and jaws lock. They make people cringe and complain -- and they're turning children and adults into crybabies.Nonetheless, ultrasour gum balls, with names like Eye Poppers and Cry Baby, Lock Jaw and Goose Bumps, are disappearing from store shelves this summer faster than manufacturers can provide them.Shocking the taste buds with 30-40 seconds of unmerciful sourness before the fruity sweetness kicks in, the gum balls have an appeal for children that's hard for parents to understand.
FEATURES
By Katie Mercado, For The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2013
I can't believe I'm actually at this point. I mean I know it's wedding shower season, but for it to be my wedding shower was an eye opener to how close we actually are to my May 25 wedding. My surprise shower was lovely! I had a hunch when it would be, so I came dressed appropriately (which I was very happy about later since it allowed for some great photos). The evening, themed “Nacho Average Bridal Shower,” was complete with a nacho/fajita bar, sangria, margaritas and a sombrero.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | May 13, 1994
Like most baseball fans, you've probably been waiting for an update on the Phillies, the Little League team of 11- and 12-year-olds that I coach along with two other dads, although we use the term "coach" loosely.Right now we have a 3-1 record and are coming off a thrilling 6-5 win over the Cardinals that should have made the 11 o'clock news if these TV sports guys had any brains, which they don't.The win over the Cards was very satisfying, since we blew a five-run lead as a result of team-wide case of the stupids, which caused us to throw the ball all over the field like it was a hand grenade.
FEATURES
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2001
I never set out to become a Backstreet Boys fan. Believe me. It's a lonely place to be. Sure, there are millions upon millions of fans out there. But all of them happen to be young girls between the ages of 7 and 13. Except, uh, me. I'll be 31 in a few days. And let me tell you, it's not easy being an adult fan of a teenybopper boy band. Not only am I mocked by each and every friend my own age, but I'm also shunned by young children. Young Backstreet Boys fans don't want me in their circle.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2000
Three years ago, when Carroll County Arts Council was searching for a winter fund-raiser, someone suggested the group hold a Christmas crafts show. "Please don't make me. There's a million of those already," Sandy Oxx, the group's executive director, remembers saying. Instead, the group decided to auction decorated wreaths that had been donated by people in the community. Selling 24-inch circles of faux pine boughs festooned with ribbons and berries seemed like a practical, seasonal way to raise money, Oxx thought.
FEATURES
November 18, 1999
Backstreet joysWhat was the coolest thing about the Backstreet Boys' Millennium Tour? Oh, please, it's just too hard to pick one thing! Here are my picks for the best and worst parts of the Boys' show in Chicago.BEST SPECIAL EFFECT: The guys coming in the arena on lighted skateboards, floating through the air.WORST COSTUME: Puffy body armor that made them look like the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. The best? The black leather outfits. Oooh-eee! Hot stuff.BIGGEST SCREAM-GETTER: Nick, closely followed by Brian and A.J. Kevin was pretty popular, too, but the roadies checking equipment before the show got more screams than Howie D.STRANGEST MOMENT: Each Boy brought one girl and her mom onstage for "The Perfect Fan."
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | July 3, 1999
150 years ago in The SunJuly 6: The seventy-third anniversary of the national birth-day of our Independence passed off very quietly so far as Baltimore was concerned. The city scarcely ever presented a more quiet appearance. Nearly all the places of public business were closed, and by nine o'clock the streets appeared to be almost deserted.100 years ago in The SunJuly 5: TWAS A GREAT FOURTH -- The glorious Fourth of July, more glorious since Admiral's Schley's victory over the Spanish fleet on the third of July of last year, was duly celebrated in Baltimore yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Staff | March 7, 1999
CONCORD, N.H. -- The 48 bits of cardboard read like a Who's Who of American presidential politics: John F. Kennedy, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Richard M. Nixon, Colossus G. Benson.Yes, Colossus G. Benson. And Billy Joe Clegg, Georgiana Doerschuck and Arthur O. Blessitt, all people -- or at least primates -- with one-time presidential ambitions and now stars of New Hampshire Presidential Primary Trading Cards.First printed last year as a civics lesson for the state's fourth-graders, the trading cards have become keepsakes for political junkie types who mainline C-SPAN and know Edmund S. Muskie's middle name (it's Sixtus)
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 4, 1997
Had the Spice Girls paid more attention in school, they'd know about hubris.They'd remember the stories from Greek mythology about heroes who began to believe their own hype and ended up losing everything. They'd recognize how foolhardy it is to assume that having great popularity is the same thing as having tTC great talent. They'd understand how wrong it is to go against the laws of bubble-gum stardom by trying to make "serious" music.Instead, the five Spices no doubt think that a "Hugh bris" is what Hugh Grant would have to go through to become Jewish.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | May 21, 1995
Next month, Topps goes retro with gum in card packs that sell for 50 cents.Topps put gum with its cards until 1992, but there were two problems. The gum stained the cards, and it wasn't Bazooka. It was a flat sheet of something comparatively tasteless that shattered if dropped.Those won't be problems next month, when Topps Bazooka Major League Baseball Bubble Gum Cards (will all these words fit on a pack?) reach store shelves."Those who used to complain that the gum left a residue won't have to worry," says Topps' Marty Appel.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2000
Three years ago, when Carroll County Arts Council was searching for a winter fund-raiser, someone suggested the group hold a Christmas crafts show. "Please don't make me. There's a million of those already," Sandy Oxx, the group's executive director, remembers saying. Instead, the group decided to auction decorated wreaths that had been donated by people in the community. Selling 24-inch circles of faux pine boughs festooned with ribbons and berries seemed like a practical, seasonal way to raise money, Oxx thought.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | May 21, 1995
Next month, Topps goes retro with gum in card packs that sell for 50 cents.Topps put gum with its cards until 1992, but there were two problems. The gum stained the cards, and it wasn't Bazooka. It was a flat sheet of something comparatively tasteless that shattered if dropped.Those won't be problems next month, when Topps Bazooka Major League Baseball Bubble Gum Cards (will all these words fit on a pack?) reach store shelves."Those who used to complain that the gum left a residue won't have to worry," says Topps' Marty Appel.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | August 14, 1994
Children, put on your walking shoes and grab your gum. You, too, can follow the Bubble Gum Tour to local sites selected for the younger set by a Westminster teen-ager."
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