Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBubba Gump
IN THE NEWS

Bubba Gump

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2011
Without Phillips as the original Light Street Pavilion anchor, would Harborplace have been so successful? I don't think it would have. Phillips was the essential ingredient in the Harborplace stew, and even as local diners increasingly stayed away, the numbers, and profits, spoke for themselves. Phillips was a monster hit during those early years. Harborplace has changed, though, and Bubba Gump could turn out to be a more strategically attractive anchor restaurant for the Harborplace of today.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2012
There's a fun new neighbor at Harborplace. Bubba Gump Shrimp Co. moved into the Light Street Pavilion in May, and the old mall, which had been looking down in the mouth, feels lively again — like a place people might actually have chosen to visit. Founded in Monterey, Calif., in 1996, the chain of casual seafood restaurants was inspired by a shrimp-loving character in the movie "Forrest Gump. " The Bubba Gump menu is packed with shrimp dishes, and the decor of a typical Bubba Gump restaurant is meant to suggest the waterside shrimp restaurant that the characters in the movie might have opened.
Advertisement
NEWS
By David Cordish | July 27, 1998
IN LIGHT of the misinformation campaign being conducted by the National Aquarium regarding the proposed Bubba Gump Shrimp Co. restaurant barge at the Inner Harbor, it is necessary to set the record straight.The Bubba Gump barge does not set a precedent for development on the harbor. Some 99 percent of the harbor is navigable water, and, by law, may not be developed. Conversely, the Bubba Gump barge is to be located in non-navigable waters, where it's perfectly legal to build structures.The Bubba Gump barge was not approved in secret.
NEWS
June 26, 2012
My husband and I live in York County, Pa., and recently we decided to visit the Inner Harbor, which we hadn't been to in some time. We arrived around noon and walked through the first building, where we found some changes but nothing drastic. Sadly, that was not our finding on entering the second building. We used to enjoy the many vendor booths and food stands there, but this time there was very little to see. A clothing store and Bubba Gump had replaced Phillips restaurant, and on the second level all we found was a Hooters and Ripley's Believe It or Not. We were very disappointed and were on our way back on I-83 just two-and-a-half hours later, after paying $19 in parking fees.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 20, 1998
ABOUT THE Bubba Gump business down at the Inner Harbor: A deal is a deal, it seems to me. If anyone should be faulted, it's the pushover Schmoke administration for granting the developer the Power Plant the right to build barges -- and apparently just about anything on them -- in the public waterway between Piers 3 and 4. Now the developer arrogantly sneers that he has every right to clutter up the waterfront with more theme development -- this one a...
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | August 23, 1998
Bubba, bubba, toil and trouble.If the witches from "Macbeth" were stirring their caldron in Baltimore's Inner Harbor, they couldn't come up with a more pungent brew than what the Bubba Gump Shrimp Co. has cooked up for the downtown waterfront.This summer's bid by the California-based restaurateur to build its first East Coast branch on a barge in the Inner Harbor has triggered a debate with Shakespearean overtones, as warring factions trade barbs in a rare and ugly public feud.Lords of the National Aquarium in Baltimore contend that construction of a restaurant in the inlet between Inner Harbor Piers 3 and 4 would set a dangerous precedent by blocking water views and preventing them from building a footbridge they need.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1998
Opposition is growing to the city's decision to permit a Bubba Gump Shrimp Co. restaurant in a public waterway near the National Aquarium, with some of Baltimore's most influential business and civic leaders decrying it as a monumental mistake in the making.Some liken it to paving the canals of Venice or building a taco stand in the middle of the Gettysburg battlefield.On Monday, aquarium director David Pittenger warned that the city's decision to allow construction of an 8,000-square-foot shrimp restaurant in the water between Piers 3 and 4 sets a "dangerous precedent" for Inner Harbor development.
NEWS
June 26, 2012
My husband and I live in York County, Pa., and recently we decided to visit the Inner Harbor, which we hadn't been to in some time. We arrived around noon and walked through the first building, where we found some changes but nothing drastic. Sadly, that was not our finding on entering the second building. We used to enjoy the many vendor booths and food stands there, but this time there was very little to see. A clothing store and Bubba Gump had replaced Phillips restaurant, and on the second level all we found was a Hooters and Ripley's Believe It or Not. We were very disappointed and were on our way back on I-83 just two-and-a-half hours later, after paying $19 in parking fees.
NEWS
July 20, 1998
Would Bubba Gump change the character of the Inner 0) Harbor?As National Aquarium volunteers who love the Inner Harbor and understand deeply what it means to the city and its millions of visitors, we offer reasons that the shrimp boat barge should be located at a place other than the waterway between the aquarium piers.Charm City would lose much of its charm if the tall restaurant barge were built in the proposed location -- actually on the Inner Harbor.With the waterway hardly visible and a quintessential Baltimore view lost, the city would be surrendering some of its signature -- ++ some of what makes it unique and attracts more and more tourists each year.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1998
Baltimore has long sought to attract developers to its waterfront, but should the city be giving up the water itself?That's the central question raised by one of the best-known local protectors of the waterways and one of the original symbols of the Inner Harbor renaissance: the National Aquarium in Baltimore.Aquarium leaders say they strongly oppose plans by the city and a local developer to allow a theme restaurant chain -- the Bubba Gump Shrimp Co. -- to build an 8,000-square-foot barge in the narrow inlet between Piers 3 and 4, where the aquarium's landmark buildings stand.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Bubba Gump Shrimp Co. is now open at Harborplace. The restaurant and market takes over the old Phillips anchor space. The restaurant will be open seven days a week for lunch and dinner. The restaurant is owned by Houston-based Landry's Inc, which refers to itself as "America's biggest dining, hospitality and entertainment company. " Their holdings include casinos, resorts, hotels and such formerly independently owned restaurants groups as McCormick & Schmick's and Morton's the Steakhouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2011
Without Phillips as the original Light Street Pavilion anchor, would Harborplace have been so successful? I don't think it would have. Phillips was the essential ingredient in the Harborplace stew, and even as local diners increasingly stayed away, the numbers, and profits, spoke for themselves. Phillips was a monster hit during those early years. Harborplace has changed, though, and Bubba Gump could turn out to be a more strategically attractive anchor restaurant for the Harborplace of today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2011
I've never been to a Bubba Gump Co. I've been reading some online reviews, and it sounds in general like Bubba Gump is better than people thought it was going to be. They have fun there. Not everyone agrees; people seldom do.    Forrest Gump Visits Bubba Gump Shrimp Co in Daytona Beach from SEE Coastal Media on Vimeo .   We can only realy agree that Bubba's "shrimp" speech in Forrest Gump is one of the most excruciating sequences in the history of cinema.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2011
That didn't take long. The anchor restaurant space in Harborplace's Light Street Pavilion that for 31 years was home to Phillips has a new tenant. Bubba Gump Shrimp Co., "the first restaurant group based on a motion picture," will occupy the space previously occupied by Phillips Seafood Restaurant and Phillips Express. “We are delighted to bring this unique casual dining option to our city and expect our visitors to embrace this fun, casual seafood restaurant wholeheartedly,” said Christopher Schardt, Harborplace’s senior general manager.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and By Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2001
In 1998, officials at the National Aquarium in Baltimore howled at plans to float a Bubba Gump restaurant - topped by a sign with a grinning shrimp - on a barge between it and the Power Plant on Pier 4. Gump was canned, but now it's the aquarium that wants to build on the Inner Harbor inlet. The waterfront mainstay envisions a floating classroom extending east from Pier 3, next to its main pavilion. A case of hypocrisy? "I plead not guilty," said David M. Pittenger, aquarium executive director.
BUSINESS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2000
Order a life preserver with your hors d'oeuvres. A flotilla of floating restaurants is growing around the Inner Harbor. Developer David S. Cordish is proposing to build a 30-foot-tall restaurant barge to the east of his Power Plant entertainment complex on Pier Four. This would be in addition to the dining platform that Cordish is building for the ESPN Zone restaurant in the water to the east of the Power Plant, and a similar outdoor eating area he built in front of the adjacent Hard Rock Cafe.
NEWS
July 16, 1998
FIRST CAME the Walt Disney Co. -- owner of amusement parks, movie studios and ABC television -- which opened its ESPN Zone restaurant and virtual-sports extravaganza at the Power Plant. Now another Tinseltown conglomerate, Paramount, wants to squeeze a restaurant modeled after a Louisiana shrimp boat from the movie "Forrest Gump" into the channel next to the National Aquarium.Eighteen years after Harborplace heralded the rebirth of Baltimore's Inner Harbor, Hollywood dream merchants are discovering this trendy restaurant and retail area that replaced rotting piers and crumbling warehouses.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1999
There was a threat of war on Pier Four last summer, with the smiling shrimp sign of the Bubba Gump Shrimp restaurant inspiring fear and loathing among the buttoned-down directors of the National Aquarium next door in the Inner Harbor.Now there is peace, and Bubba is in retreat.The directors of the aquarium and the company that developed the adjacent Power Plant retail complex said yesterday that they have reached an agreement on expansion plans that offered contrasting visions of Baltimore's waterfront.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | July 4, 1999
At first glance, the top of a proposed addition to Baltimore's Inner Harbor looks like a pair of canvas sails billowing in the breeze. On closer inspection, it's apparent that those sails are rising above one of the piers, not the water.Did some misguided mariner make a wrong turn coming out of the HarborView marina? Was this errant schooner washed ashore in a freak squall?Not exactly. This is the design for a $40 million office and retail center, sculpted to evoke a tall ship. What resembles sailcloth is actually the curving glass shell of a nine-story tower, rising from the middle of Pier 4. On the inside would be seven levels of offices above two levels of stores and restaurant space.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.