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Erica L. Green | May 15, 2013
Marietta English, longtime leader of the Baltimore Teachers Union, was re-elected to another term, the organization announced in a release Wednesday.  According to the release, English was re-elected president by teachers, paraprofessionals, and school-related personnel. It will be her seventh term--one she served as president of the teacher's chapter--which lasts three years. “I'm proud to have received the support of Baltimore's paraprofessionals, school-related personnel and teachers,” English said in a statement.
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NEWS
Erica L. Green | June 13, 2013
A caucus of the Baltimore Teachers Union has conducted its own survey which concluded that, of the sample participants, city teachers have been overwhelmingly dissatisfied with the union contract that is set to expire this month. According to the survey, conducted by the Educators for Democratic Schools, of the roughly 200 teachers polled, only 11 percent of respondents said they would vote for the contract--passed in 2010, and hailed as the most progressive in the country for its pay-for-performance structure--if faced with the decision again.
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NEWS
By Kathy Lally | December 11, 1990
The president of the powerful Baltimore Teachers Union said yesterday that there has been no improvement in Baltimore classrooms since Richard C. Hunter arrived as superintendent 2 1/2 years ago and that the union's board would soon vote on whether he should be rehired."
NEWS
Erica L. Green | May 15, 2013
Marietta English, longtime leader of the Baltimore Teachers Union, was re-elected to another term, the organization announced in a release Wednesday.  According to the release, English was re-elected president by teachers, paraprofessionals, and school-related personnel. It will be her seventh term--one she served as president of the teacher's chapter--which lasts three years. “I'm proud to have received the support of Baltimore's paraprofessionals, school-related personnel and teachers,” English said in a statement.
NEWS
By Arthur L. Laupus | May 27, 1996
THE SUN'S recent articles about the Baltimore Teachers Union were well balanced and informative.However, your May 20 editorial, "City teachers teach a lesson," ,, was myopic and self-serving.To assume that the new BTU president, Marcia Brown, must first address the problems of an inept, ineffective school system is naive and simplistic. She has more immediate problems that deserve her attention.First of all, she finds herself president of a union tainted by nepotism, cronyism and outright corruption.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,Sun Staff Writer | August 15, 1994
Irene and Lorretta. Lorretta and Irene. In Baltimore school circles, and in a widening circle nationally, there's no need for surnames.For 15 years, Irene B. Dandridge and Lorretta Johnson have been a two-woman team running the 8,400-member Baltimore Teachers Union. And when the city's largest municipal union speaks, people often listen.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke listened in June when the union demanded school Superintendent Walter G. Amprey's resignation. The mayor held an emergency summit meeting and asked the union to suspend hostilities.
NEWS
By Dewitt Bliss and Dewitt Bliss,Sun Staff Writer | July 28, 1994
John D. Bethea, a former president of the Baltimore Teachers Union (BTU) who had been a track star during his high school and college years, died Sunday after a heart attack at his home in Forest Park. He was 51.He had taught for 22 years, at Lafayette Elementary School, then at Liberty Elementary School and finally at Hilton Elementary School.He was president of the BTU from 1974 through 1979. In 1976, the union and its rival, the Public School Teachers Association (PSTA), were decertified as bargaining agents for city school teachers as a result of a 1974 strike.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1996
The Baltimore Teachers Union will seek help from a private accounting firm and the Washington-based American Federation of Teachers (AFT) to confront its growing deficit, BTU officials said yesterday.The decisions were made at an emergency meeting of the BTU governing board and marked a break in the bumpy transition of power at the headquarters of the city's largest municipal union, which recently elected a new president.Since the bitter election campaign, when opponents of the union's long-entrenched leadership disclosed the BTU's financial troubles, union leaders have been at odds.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Thomas W. Waldron and Jean Thompson and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1996
On the eve of its most fiercely contested election in years, the Baltimore Teachers Union has arrived at a crossroads.The city's teachers must choose Thursday from among three candidates for president, including the incumbent of 17 years.Unlike many past sedate campaigns, this one has been marked by angry denunciations after disclosures that the BTU's longtime leaders benefited from interest-free salary advances and lucrative compensation without the knowledge of most members.Meanwhile, many of the BTU's 5,600 teachers feel that their jobs are threatened by dwindling city resources, school violence, state school reform and declining enrollment.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Thomas W. Waldron and Jean Thompson and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1996
Two days before the Baltimore Teachers Union election, candidates for president outlined their philosophies on radio, traded barbs and papered city schools with campaign letters.Incumbent President Irene B. Dandridge and challenger Marcia Brown, 52, the BTU's executive vice president, distributed letters to teachers citywide. Both debated with a third candidate, teacher Adolph McDonald, 59, yesterday in the studio of WEAA-FM radio at Morgan State University."You can choose to vote for experienced leadership or vote for amateurs," Dandridge, 61, wrote in her letter to teachers and reiterated during the evening broadcast.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | December 3, 2012
In the next five years, teachers entering the profession would first have to pass an comprehensive licensing exam--much like the bar exam for attorneys--as part of their certification, under a new proposal announced this week by the largest U.S. teachers union.  Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, rolled out her vision for the exam Monday, which she said would better prepare educators not only in their content areas,...
NEWS
Erica L. Green | March 20, 2012
Since our story last week on the $65 million in unused sick/vacation/personal leave the Baltimore City school system has paid out in the past five years, I've been receiving feedback from several city teachers who said that there is a new order in town about the use of sick leave, and it has many worried. City educators have reported that in an effort to crackdown on teacher truancy, the district has directed that principals discourage teachers from using their sick leave, to the point where their absences could be reflected in their year-end evaluations.
NEWS
April 13, 2011
Let me get the straight. The General Assembly has increased the tax on alcohol by 50 percent for all Marylanders to benefit the school systems in Baltimore City and Prince George's County. Yet Baltimore City negotiates with the BTU so that 3,000 paraprofessionals may get pay raises, some retroactive to July 2010, more holidays off and let's not forget spring break for non-school workers. Who negotiated with the union? What a slap in the face to the citizens of the other 22 counties.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,sara.neufeld@baltsun.com | May 9, 2009
"The Horror of a Fairy Tale" was the title of the essay Janna Chevon Thompson submitted in January when she applied for the Baltimore Teachers Union's Extreme Classroom/Library Makeover contest. She wrote about how she'd realized her dream of teaching arts in an urban setting with her job at Southside Academy in Cherry Hill. But in addition to "discouraged students, lack of funding [and] lack of support," she was constantly frustrated by "an uninhabitable learning environment." When it's hot, there is no air conditioning.
NEWS
November 21, 2008
Refreshing candor from the new leader Watching Steve Kroft's post-election interview with President-elect Barack Obama, I was braced for the wearisome bluster, swagger and hot-air rhetoric that have come with every (so-called) presidential figure in recent memory ("'60 Minutes' scores with Obama interview," Nov. 20). But they didn't come. Instead, we saw a future commander in chief deliver his thoughts with unprecedented calm, clarity, composure and, finally, straight talk. It was a thrilling moment, but not in the standard sense: not because of Mr. Obama's victory but because of the excitement I felt as I watched our president-elect answer questions in a cool-headed and sincere manner.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2004
Two candidates for president of the Baltimore Teachers Union have raised concerns about next week's election, saying the process favors incumbents and isn't fairly run. Three teachers are running against union President Marietta English. Two of the challengers - Clarice Herbert-Brown, a languages teacher at Walbrook High Uniform Services Academy, and Kojo L. McCallum, a fourth-grade teacher at Charles Carroll Barrister Elementary School - said they have become increasingly frustrated with the process.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,sara.neufeld@baltsun.com | May 9, 2009
"The Horror of a Fairy Tale" was the title of the essay Janna Chevon Thompson submitted in January when she applied for the Baltimore Teachers Union's Extreme Classroom/Library Makeover contest. She wrote about how she'd realized her dream of teaching arts in an urban setting with her job at Southside Academy in Cherry Hill. But in addition to "discouraged students, lack of funding [and] lack of support," she was constantly frustrated by "an uninhabitable learning environment." When it's hot, there is no air conditioning.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Joe Mathews and Jean Thompson and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1996
Only a week after a change of leadership in the Baltimore Teachers Union, supporters of ousted president Irene B. Dandridge are fighting her successor's efforts to take charge of the labor group.Their resistance to the change comes as newly elected President Marcia Brown struggles with deepening union financial troubles, including a budget deficit that is projected to reach $300,000 by the end of June."I went into this naive," Brown said in an interview this week. "This would have been believable to me if we were not a union of teachers.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Liz Bowie and Tanika White and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2004
Thousands of angry Baltimore schoolteachers and aides voted overwhelmingly to reject a 3.5 percent cut in salaries yesterday - a decision that could trigger even deeper pay cuts across the city school system or possible mass layoffs to ease a financial crisis that has been simmering for months. Nearly three-quarters of the more than 5,200 Baltimore Teachers Union members who cast ballots at the Baltimore Convention Center voted against a proposal that would have helped the system meet its budget goals this school year and still pay down part of a crushing $58 million cumulative deficit.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2004
The Baltimore Teachers Union, long a bit player in city school affairs, suddenly is in a lead role, thrust there by thousands of members who delivered a message yesterday: We're fed up. Nearly three-quarters of the BTU's member teachers voted at the Convention Center to reject the city's proposal that they accept a 3.5 percent pay cut to help ease a school budget crisis. After the votes were counted in early evening, about two dozen teachers stood in a circle in front of the building, held hands and sang "We Shall Overcome" and its education version, "We Will Teach the Children."
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