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Bryant Park

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TRAVEL
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | September 13, 2009
NEW YORK - - You can picnic in a park, walk in a park or sleep in a park. You can also read in a park, but it is the rare park that provides the reading material for you. One that does is Bryant Park, a little gem of green space in the heart of Manhattan where the skyscrapers provide shade. Those who restored the park to its innocence in the 1990s after a long, dark period of disrepair and disrepute also restored its Depression-era role as a reading park. Bryant Park is located between 40th and 42nd streets and Fifth Avenue and Avenue of the Americas, in the shadow of the New York Public Library.
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FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | July 17, 2012
While on vacation last week, I stumbled on one of the most pleasant library settings imaginable: Bryant Park , swath of green behind the main branch of the New York Public Library . Among the trees on the northern end of the park are book carts and tables, creating the perfect setting for a day of reading -- even when temperatures were in the mid-90s. If I hadn't been on a tight sight-seeing schedule, I would have loved to sit down with a book or magazine for an hour in the Bryant Park Reading Room.
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FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | July 17, 2012
While on vacation last week, I stumbled on one of the most pleasant library settings imaginable: Bryant Park , swath of green behind the main branch of the New York Public Library . Among the trees on the northern end of the park are book carts and tables, creating the perfect setting for a day of reading -- even when temperatures were in the mid-90s. If I hadn't been on a tight sight-seeing schedule, I would have loved to sit down with a book or magazine for an hour in the Bryant Park Reading Room.
EXPLORE
June 8, 2011
In my quiet childhood days of roller-skating to the Roland Water Tower, I would never have envisioned what I saw there June 4. What I saw in the 1950s were people sitting on the cement bench waiting for the bus, green buses going around the circular drive, occasional children playing on the small hill. No graceful Japanese zelkovas created a shady canopy then. Few Roland Parkers had ever even seen Japanese zelkovas that now grace the Roland Avenue median. I don't remember what trees, if any, grew near the water tower.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2010
Baltimore Fashion Week is days away, and the pressure is building for the event's director, Sharan Nixon Baltimore Fashion Week is days away, and the pressure is building for the event's director, Sharan Nixon. The longtime model has finally found a contractor to build a New York-inspired elevated runway to her liking. But her heart still races each time she thinks about the $22,000 of her savings she has used to fund the event. "I'm struggling between life expenses and fashion expenses," said Nixon, a 45-year-old Northwest Baltimore resident who launched Baltimore Fashion Week two years ago. "I will keep on doing it. I do it for the designers.
EXPLORE
June 5, 2011
In my quiet childhood days of roller-skating to the Roland Water Tower, I would never have envisioned what I saw there this Saturday.   What I saw in the 1950’s were people sitting on the cement bench waiting for the bus, green buses going around the circular drive, occasional children playing on the small hill. No graceful Japanese zelkovas created a shady canopy then. Few Roland Parkers had ever even seen Japanese zelkovas that now grace the Roland Avenue median. I don’t remember what trees, if any, grew near the water tower.
EXPLORE
June 8, 2011
In my quiet childhood days of roller-skating to the Roland Water Tower, I would never have envisioned what I saw there June 4. What I saw in the 1950s were people sitting on the cement bench waiting for the bus, green buses going around the circular drive, occasional children playing on the small hill. No graceful Japanese zelkovas created a shady canopy then. Few Roland Parkers had ever even seen Japanese zelkovas that now grace the Roland Avenue median. I don't remember what trees, if any, grew near the water tower.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2010
Jearlean is a 42-year-old model who has struggled for years to break through. Courtney is a curvy size 18 with her eyes set on Bryant Park. Deja is the youngest and shortest of the group. In the fashion industry, which places a premium on being young, slim and tall, many models who fall outside those boundaries have found it hard to succeed. But at Baltimore Fashion Week, which begins Thursday, models of all shades, ages and sizes are getting an opportunity to strut their stuff. "[Baltimore]
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun reporter | September 12, 2007
New York -- Over the hectic eight days that make up Fashion Week - which is wrapping up today in New York's Bryant Park - what you eat is almost as important as what you wear. After all, you'll need enough calories to get you from the Lacoste show at 10 a.m. to the Ralph Lauren show at 8:30 p.m., and back up again for the DKNY show the next morning. And yet, for the fashion-obsessed, there's always the worry about fitting into next season's slinky sarong. "Everybody's like `caffeine, caffeine,' " says Anastasia Wylie, 23, who was waiting under the tents with two friends one day last week to get into the Temperley London presentation.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Reporter | February 13, 2007
NEW YORK-- --When you meet fashion designer Vincent Licari, you might ask: What does a 25-year-old man know about lace and curves? What does a man from Fallston, no less, know about wild, feminine flourishes? Last week, Licari staged a show that put those questions to rest. In the dramatically pillared lobby of an off-Broadway theater, just a few blocks from where the country's biggest designers presented their fall collections, Licari pulled off what so many fledgling designers only dream about: a real New York runway show, complete with lithe models and flashing bulbs, discerning fashion editors and fizzing champagne.
EXPLORE
June 5, 2011
In my quiet childhood days of roller-skating to the Roland Water Tower, I would never have envisioned what I saw there this Saturday.   What I saw in the 1950’s were people sitting on the cement bench waiting for the bus, green buses going around the circular drive, occasional children playing on the small hill. No graceful Japanese zelkovas created a shady canopy then. Few Roland Parkers had ever even seen Japanese zelkovas that now grace the Roland Avenue median. I don’t remember what trees, if any, grew near the water tower.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2010
Jearlean is a 42-year-old model who has struggled for years to break through. Courtney is a curvy size 18 with her eyes set on Bryant Park. Deja is the youngest and shortest of the group. In the fashion industry, which places a premium on being young, slim and tall, many models who fall outside those boundaries have found it hard to succeed. But at Baltimore Fashion Week, which begins Thursday, models of all shades, ages and sizes are getting an opportunity to strut their stuff. "[Baltimore]
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2010
Baltimore Fashion Week is days away, and the pressure is building for the event's director, Sharan Nixon Baltimore Fashion Week is days away, and the pressure is building for the event's director, Sharan Nixon. The longtime model has finally found a contractor to build a New York-inspired elevated runway to her liking. But her heart still races each time she thinks about the $22,000 of her savings she has used to fund the event. "I'm struggling between life expenses and fashion expenses," said Nixon, a 45-year-old Northwest Baltimore resident who launched Baltimore Fashion Week two years ago. "I will keep on doing it. I do it for the designers.
TRAVEL
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | September 13, 2009
NEW YORK - - You can picnic in a park, walk in a park or sleep in a park. You can also read in a park, but it is the rare park that provides the reading material for you. One that does is Bryant Park, a little gem of green space in the heart of Manhattan where the skyscrapers provide shade. Those who restored the park to its innocence in the 1990s after a long, dark period of disrepair and disrepute also restored its Depression-era role as a reading park. Bryant Park is located between 40th and 42nd streets and Fifth Avenue and Avenue of the Americas, in the shadow of the New York Public Library.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun reporter | September 12, 2007
New York -- Over the hectic eight days that make up Fashion Week - which is wrapping up today in New York's Bryant Park - what you eat is almost as important as what you wear. After all, you'll need enough calories to get you from the Lacoste show at 10 a.m. to the Ralph Lauren show at 8:30 p.m., and back up again for the DKNY show the next morning. And yet, for the fashion-obsessed, there's always the worry about fitting into next season's slinky sarong. "Everybody's like `caffeine, caffeine,' " says Anastasia Wylie, 23, who was waiting under the tents with two friends one day last week to get into the Temperley London presentation.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Reporter | February 13, 2007
NEW YORK-- --When you meet fashion designer Vincent Licari, you might ask: What does a 25-year-old man know about lace and curves? What does a man from Fallston, no less, know about wild, feminine flourishes? Last week, Licari staged a show that put those questions to rest. In the dramatically pillared lobby of an off-Broadway theater, just a few blocks from where the country's biggest designers presented their fall collections, Licari pulled off what so many fledgling designers only dream about: a real New York runway show, complete with lithe models and flashing bulbs, discerning fashion editors and fizzing champagne.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2005
NEW YORK - Instead of strutting in stilettos, they bounced in saddle shoes. No, these were not the usual models seen on the runways of Fashion Week, except for the labels on the clothes they were wearing: Escada, Hilfiger, Sean John, Kenneth Cole, Nicole Miller. Those were some of the designers showing their fall lines here yesterday - for 4- to 11-year-olds. Call it high fashion for the knee-high set, the kind of cashmere blazers, leather jackets and faux furs that trendy moms and dads wear, miniaturized for their offspring.
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