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SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | November 29, 1992
Baltimore is one of the few cities seeking a pro football team that has not resorted to a name-the-team contest to whip up fan support. But that hasn't kept fans out of the game.At least three of them have gone so far as to draw up specific designs, apply for formal trade name or trademark protection and submit them to the investment groups vying to own a team in Baltimore."When I heard about the NFL effort I thought, 'This is my chance,' " said Matt Battison, a graphic artist with Mobil Corp.
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SPORTS
By Vito Stellino | October 1, 1991
The Baltimore NFL expansion derby is down to three owner finalists -- businessmen Malcolm Glazer and Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass and author Tom Clancy.They are the three groups who have sent in their applications to the NFL along with a $100,000 filing fee. The deadline for filing is today."The race is on," Clancy said.Although Baltimore may be the only one of the 11 contending cities with more than one owner group, Bryan Glazer, one of Malcolm's sons, said: "This brings attention to the city, which is a plus for everybody.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | June 24, 1992
Bryan Glazer likes to compare the NFL's expansion derby to the fable of the tortoise and the hare."You never want to be one of the people who are No. 1 when you start out," he said. "That's the curse."Glazer, the son of Florida businessman Malcolm Glazer, who's heading one of the three owner groups attempting to get an expansion team for Baltimore, says Baltimore is playing the tortoise role.When the Glazers decided to bid for a team in Baltimore last year because they thought the city had the most to offer the NFL, the general perception was that Baltimore was running third in a two-horse race behind Charlotte and St. Louis.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Evening Sun Staff | October 1, 1991
Three for the price of one.After all the posturing and politicking, after all the campaigning and crooning, that's what Baltimore's bid for an NFL expansion franchise comes down to.Three potential owners say they have filed applications for one potential franchise, meeting today's written-in-clay deadline.Bowing out in an 11th-hour decision was the Phyllis Brotman group that included four Baltimoreans. Unable to convince chicken king Frank Perdue to invest big bucks, the Brotman people withdrew from the expansion race, but left the door slightly ajar.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2002
It took more than a month to complete, reeling through fiasco after fiasco, but the Tampa Bay Buccaneers' clumsy coaching search finally ended yesterday when Jon Gruden agreed to replace Tony Dungy. Only after striking a deal with Oakland owner Al Davis were the Bucs able to pry Gruden loose from the Raiders. The price of getting the offensive-minded coach of their choice was extravagant: The Bucs will surrender four draft picks, including two first-rounders, to the Raiders over the next three years.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Evening Sun Staff pXB | October 16, 1991
The anticipated sale of the New England Patriots in the wake of owner Victor K. Kiam's financial difficulties should have no bearing on Baltimore's bid for an NFL expansion team, all parties said yesterday.None of the three primary investors who have applied for an expansion franchise here is interested in buying the Patriots."Am I interested in buying the team and moving it to Baltimore? No," said best-selling novelist Tom Clancy, asking and answering his own question."Just because someone steals your car, it doesn't mean you are entitled to go steal someone else's car. It's immoral."
NEWS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Writer | August 27, 1993
Forget the beasts of the jungle. Scratch the horse family. And don't even mention prehistoric legacies.Baltimore, home of the Orioles, has sided decisively with the birds once again.This time, though, it's the Ravens who have captured the city's imagination, if not its heart.By a margin of more than 3-to-1, fans have endorsed Ravens as the preferred nickname of a football team if Baltimore wins an NFL expansion team in October.Ravens amassed 6,367 votes in The Baltimore Sun's Name-That-Team survey, which tabulated phone responses andwrite-in ballots.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | September 13, 1992
When a legion of former Colts took the field at halftime durin the NFL preseason game at Memorial Stadium last month, it represented a carefully orchestrated crescendo.NFL officials, scouting a site for two new teams, were there, fresh from a series of meetings and events designed to make the case for Baltimore.Observers marveled at the timing, which organizers said was part luck and part planning. Orioles tickets were selling faster than the latest Nikes, the sold-out preseason game was the only one of the year hosted by an expansion-hopeful city, and a bid in Charlotte, N.C., appeared to be foundering on financing troubles.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | October 27, 1993
ROSEMONT, Ill. -- Now Baltimore, as never before, must reach back for extra strength, continuing resolve and a new ownership arrangement to assemble its resources for still another drive toward the National Football League goal line.It would be foolhardy to let the disappointment of last night's expansion effort destroy the exceptional work that has carried Baltimore this far. Gov. William Donald Schaefer and the Maryland Stadium Authority aren't going to back off now.They are still alive in the expansion chase.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino | December 11, 1991
As Baltimore prepared its first show-and-tell session designed to sell itself as an expansion city to NFL officials, commissioner Paul Tagliabue again raised the specter yesterday of a delay in the NFL's expansion timetable because of labor problems."
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