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By TOM PETERS | November 2, 1992
At a recent conference on the fate of Silicon Valley, futurist Alvin Toffler only half-facetiously proposed the creation of an Academy of Intangible Assets Accountants. Why? Toffler claims we are moving from a "brute force economy" to a "brain force economy."This change presages "a revolution in culture, family, war, logic, causality, epistemology and civilization," says Toffler, whose track record ("Future Shock," "The Third Wave," "Powershift") puts fellow prognosticators to shame. As a result, "No amount of tinkering will solve America's economic problems."
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 11, 2014
The report that protesters have declared two eastern Ukraine cities to be independent republics questions President Obama's assurance that there is no "military solution" to the crisis that began with Russian President Vladmir Putin's land grab of Crimea. "If Russia moves into eastern Ukraine, either overtly or covertly," White House press secretary Jay Carney said Monday, "this would be a very serious escalation. " But what does that mean? A State Department spokesperson said only that such a move "would result in additional costs" to Moscow.
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NEWS
By Ben Wattenberg | June 5, 1997
WASHINGTON -- No sooner had IBM's Deep Blue whipped chess champion Garry Kasparov than the question came, ''Can machines think?'' Many of the experts answered, ''No.'' They said that Deep's activity wasn't really thinking, it was just the ''brute force'' of calculations made possible by so much computing power (200 million operations per second!). That isn't really thinking, the argument went: A computer is just ''a big dumb adding machine.''Daniel Dennet, director of the Tufts University Center for Cognitive Studies, puts the topic in a different light.
NEWS
August 10, 2011
Syria's bloody crackdown on anti-government demonstrators reached new levels of brutality this week with the killing of hundreds of civilians in the city of Hama, a hotbed of resistance to the regime of President Bashar Assad. For months, Mr. Assad ignored the international community's mounting condemnation of his repressive tactics, choosing instead to hunker and unleash his security forces against unarmed civilians. He continued to lash out even after Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and Kuwait — nominal allies that have been reluctant to criticize a fellow Sunni Arab leader — took the rare step last week of recalling their ambassadors from Damascus in protest.
NEWS
August 10, 2011
Syria's bloody crackdown on anti-government demonstrators reached new levels of brutality this week with the killing of hundreds of civilians in the city of Hama, a hotbed of resistance to the regime of President Bashar Assad. For months, Mr. Assad ignored the international community's mounting condemnation of his repressive tactics, choosing instead to hunker and unleash his security forces against unarmed civilians. He continued to lash out even after Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and Kuwait — nominal allies that have been reluctant to criticize a fellow Sunni Arab leader — took the rare step last week of recalling their ambassadors from Damascus in protest.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 11, 2014
The report that protesters have declared two eastern Ukraine cities to be independent republics questions President Obama's assurance that there is no "military solution" to the crisis that began with Russian President Vladmir Putin's land grab of Crimea. "If Russia moves into eastern Ukraine, either overtly or covertly," White House press secretary Jay Carney said Monday, "this would be a very serious escalation. " But what does that mean? A State Department spokesperson said only that such a move "would result in additional costs" to Moscow.
BUSINESS
By Tom Peters and Tom Peters,1991 TPG COMMUNICATIONS | February 4, 1991
Last week I described the organizational transformation at high-tech hose-maker Titeflex: Orders taking months to fulfill in 1988 are now out the door in a couple of days. This week we'll see what lies behind the miracle in Springfield, Mass.Titeflex was an early adopter of Materials Requirements Planning computer software. Unfortunately, the touted system was imposed on antiquated processes. "We automated chaos," says company President Jon Simpson. "The computer governed our lives." After taking charge at Titeflex in August 1988, Simpson, on a business trip, called the office only to find that the computer was down.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 13, 2001
WASHINGTON - On the third floor of the Pentagon, behind closed doors, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld and a coterie of advisers are quietly fashioning what may be a drastically altered military for the 21st century. Security is tight. The officers and civilian defense analysts providing information to Rumsfeld and his team are sworn to secrecy. Not much has leaked out, but some analysts - reading tea leaves based on the officials involved and the marching orders issued by President Bush - say Rumsfeld's goal might be a major transformation of the roles, missions and weapons of the armed forces.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | March 2, 1992
Not only are most American prisons and jails packed to the gills, says Princeton University's John DiIulio:''Hundreds of them are also filthy, vice-ridden places. Few offer inmates any meaningful opportunity to work, to achieve literacy, or to free themselves from the shackles of substance abuse.''Our national government doesn't seem to care a whit. Attorney General William Barr recently ordered an about-face on Justice Department policy which for years had pressed the states to relieve gross prison overcrowding.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Sun Staff Writer | April 12, 1994
Only six games have been played, but the Orioles have established a clear offensive pattern.It will not endear Johnny Oates to the purists, but former Orioles manager Earl Weaver would give hearty approval."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 13, 2001
WASHINGTON - On the third floor of the Pentagon, behind closed doors, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld and a coterie of advisers are quietly fashioning what may be a drastically altered military for the 21st century. Security is tight. The officers and civilian defense analysts providing information to Rumsfeld and his team are sworn to secrecy. Not much has leaked out, but some analysts - reading tea leaves based on the officials involved and the marching orders issued by President Bush - say Rumsfeld's goal might be a major transformation of the roles, missions and weapons of the armed forces.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2000
As big as the Washington Redskins game was for Ravens fans last week, tomorrow's date with the Tennessee Titans is bigger. As good as Stephen Davis is, running back Eddie George might be better. In Week 8 at PSINet Stadium, the Ravens get another litmus test to determine if they're good enough to win the AFC Central. The first-place Titans are the other team in what appears to be a two-team sprint for the division title. "This is a big game, and there haven't been a lot of big games in Baltimore," Ravens defensive end Michael Mc- Crary said yesterday.
NEWS
By Ben Wattenberg | June 5, 1997
WASHINGTON -- No sooner had IBM's Deep Blue whipped chess champion Garry Kasparov than the question came, ''Can machines think?'' Many of the experts answered, ''No.'' They said that Deep's activity wasn't really thinking, it was just the ''brute force'' of calculations made possible by so much computing power (200 million operations per second!). That isn't really thinking, the argument went: A computer is just ''a big dumb adding machine.''Daniel Dennet, director of the Tufts University Center for Cognitive Studies, puts the topic in a different light.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Sun Staff Writer | April 12, 1994
Only six games have been played, but the Orioles have established a clear offensive pattern.It will not endear Johnny Oates to the purists, but former Orioles manager Earl Weaver would give hearty approval."
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | November 2, 1992
At a recent conference on the fate of Silicon Valley, futurist Alvin Toffler only half-facetiously proposed the creation of an Academy of Intangible Assets Accountants. Why? Toffler claims we are moving from a "brute force economy" to a "brain force economy."This change presages "a revolution in culture, family, war, logic, causality, epistemology and civilization," says Toffler, whose track record ("Future Shock," "The Third Wave," "Powershift") puts fellow prognosticators to shame. As a result, "No amount of tinkering will solve America's economic problems."
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | March 2, 1992
Not only are most American prisons and jails packed to the gills, says Princeton University's John DiIulio:''Hundreds of them are also filthy, vice-ridden places. Few offer inmates any meaningful opportunity to work, to achieve literacy, or to free themselves from the shackles of substance abuse.''Our national government doesn't seem to care a whit. Attorney General William Barr recently ordered an about-face on Justice Department policy which for years had pressed the states to relieve gross prison overcrowding.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2000
As big as the Washington Redskins game was for Ravens fans last week, tomorrow's date with the Tennessee Titans is bigger. As good as Stephen Davis is, running back Eddie George might be better. In Week 8 at PSINet Stadium, the Ravens get another litmus test to determine if they're good enough to win the AFC Central. The first-place Titans are the other team in what appears to be a two-team sprint for the division title. "This is a big game, and there haven't been a lot of big games in Baltimore," Ravens defensive end Michael Mc- Crary said yesterday.
SPORTS
April 1, 2007
Key showdown Al Horford vs. Greg Oden. Both players are willing to use brute force inside, but Horford - one of the Gators' top scorers - is more polished offensively. For Gators to win If Florida is able to stop the Buckeyes inside, the Gators could emerge with their second straight national title. For Buckeyes to win Ohio State needs to keep Oden on the court so Florida's big men cannot dominate inside. On TV Chs. 13, 9 at 9:21 p.m.
BUSINESS
By Tom Peters and Tom Peters,1991 TPG COMMUNICATIONS | February 4, 1991
Last week I described the organizational transformation at high-tech hose-maker Titeflex: Orders taking months to fulfill in 1988 are now out the door in a couple of days. This week we'll see what lies behind the miracle in Springfield, Mass.Titeflex was an early adopter of Materials Requirements Planning computer software. Unfortunately, the touted system was imposed on antiquated processes. "We automated chaos," says company President Jon Simpson. "The computer governed our lives." After taking charge at Titeflex in August 1988, Simpson, on a business trip, called the office only to find that the computer was down.
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