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Brussels Sprouts

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By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2010
Millicent Beal from Jarrettsville was trying to find a recipe she saw in a magazine not long ago for Brussels sprouts with pecans. Barbara Clark from Windsor, Calif., sent in a recipe she had from Cooking Light magazine for making Brussels sprouts that she said she really enjoys. She said that she thinks it "elevates boring Brussels sprouts to a tastier level." Slicing the Brussels sprouts before sautéing cuts done on the cooking time. The addition of sugar and chicken stock give the dish a somewhat sweet yet rich and balanced flavor and the toasted pecans on top finish the dish perfectly.
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NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2013
At Maggie's Farm, on a late December night, the small, square Harford Road dining room was full, with couples and foursomes along the edges, and in the middle, two separate large parties, of 12 and 18, celebrating birthdays. We were concerned about our own good time. Are these people going to get loud? Can I get my order in before they do? There was no need to worry, not at Maggie's Farm, which serves up big flavors with a mellow attitude and makes the hard work of preparing and serving good food feel effortless.
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NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,Chicago Tribune | October 17, 2007
Pork roast is one of my fall favorites. The only problem? A pork roast takes time, which relegates it to weekend cooking. The next-best option for a weeknight meal is the smaller, lean pork tenderloin. It still offers the great flavor of pork, but takes only a fraction of the time to cook. I like to sear it quickly in a heavy skillet, then turn down the heat to finish the cooking. Brussels sprouts, another fine fall choice, make a good match to the pork and can be finished in the same skillet.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | December 4, 2012
Clementine is teaming with Boordy Vineyards for a Maryland Harvest Dinner, which will be served on Monday at the Harford Road restaurant. Designed to complement wines from Boordy Vineyard's limited quantity Landmark Series, the menu from Jill Snyder includes seared scallops with celery root cream, oyster mushrooms and a fennel and radish salad; local braised rabbit with Everona Dairy 'Piedmont' sheep's milk gnocchi, baby carrots, Brussels sprouts,...
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | November 12, 2000
THEY LURKED ON the back porch, waiting for me. They were Brussels sprouts, my avowed enemy. The enmity I hold for Brussels sprouts goes back decades. As a child they held me hostage. I grew up in a household where the kids could not leave the supper table until we had taken at least one bite of every dish served during the meal. The one-bite tactic backfired. I ended up hating Brussels sprouts, as did all but one of my three brothers. One of the few benefits of becoming an adult was getting the right to veto the appearance of that vegetable in my home.
FEATURES
By Russ Parsons and Russ Parsons,los angeles times | March 24, 1999
Brussels sprouts are never going to win any popularity contests. They're the weak member of the vegetable pack, the one everyone likes to pick on. Brussels sprouts are weird-looking, like miniature cabbages. Maybe that's why they're usually shoved away in some dark corner of the produce market. Unlike broccoli, which is also weird-looking but seems to be in your face every time you turn around, they'll never gain acceptance merely through familiarity.What's more, brussels sprouts are ugly and they smell bad.Well, that's not exactly accurate.
FEATURES
By Lynn Williams | October 2, 1991
Brussels sprouts, like a certain comedian we could name, get no respect. They find their way to the top of a lot of people's "yuck" lists -- most unjustly, in our opinion. Sprouts that are over-cooked or over-age have given them a bad reputation, but at their best, the jewel-like miniature cabbages have a tender crunch and delightful mild flavor.As the name suggests, Brussels sprouts are believed to have been developed in Belgium, probably during the Middle Ages. Most of the sprouts found in today's markets, though, come from California.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | April 5, 1996
We can't just lock up the state of Montana.This administration needed a hero and in the unexpected persona of Ron Brown has one.People who survived the Blitz and terrorists and brussels sprouts can make do with mutton until this mad cow business is sorted out.If only Jane Austen had lived past the age of 41, there would be more decent movies made today.Pub Date: 4/05/96
NEWS
By Paul Fleischman | July 26, 2000
Editor's note: One industrious and inventive boy plants the seeds of a new civilization. "Of course he's miserable," moaned Wesley's mother. "He sticks out." "Like a nose," snapped his father. Listening through the heating vent, Wesley knew they were right. He was an outcast from the civilization around him. He alone in his town disliked pizza and soda, alarming his mother and the school nurse. He found professional football stupid. He'd refused to shave half his head, the hairstyle worn by all the other boys, despite his father's bribe of five dollars.
FEATURES
By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens Magazine | March 13, 1991
Eating cabbage on St. Patrick's Day may bring you more than good luck. Researchers can't give specific recommendations, but one serving a week of cruciferous vegetables appears to provide some protection against colon cancer.Cruciferous (pronounced crew-SIF-er-us) is the scientific name for vegetables from the cabbage family, including cabbage, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, rutabaga, kale and turnips. Because of the good things these vegetables provide, try to eat cabbage or a member of its family at least once a week.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
For Bryan Voltaggio, this holiday season is about beginnings. His latest restaurant venture - and the first outside Frederick - is slated to open. It will be his family's first Christmas in their new Urbana home. And with a son age 5 and a daughter who's not quite 2, that tender age when he's pretty sure Christmas memories start to truly cement, the chef and father is determined to do it right. No surprise, he'll be making most of it happen in the kitchen - Santa's workshop with cinnamon, nutmeg, orange peel and peppermint.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, For The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
Thanksgiving can be an overwhelming holiday. Even the most seasoned cooks can become agitated by the menu planning and trying to get all the details just perfect. Relax. Area farmers' markets have got you covered. Even as the growing season draws to a close, the markets' bustle increases with shoppers looking for ingredients for their Thanksgiving feast and farmers selling their last big crops of the year. The weekend before Thanksgiving is traditionally the markets' biggest weekend of the year (though many run until the week before Christmas)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2011
Russell Brown, executive chef at O'Learys Seafood Restaurant in Annapolis, was in Today's Kitchen on Nov. 18 with Al Roker and Natalie Morales. The funniest thing happened. See, Brown is demonstrating how to make swordfish steak au poivre, and Morales notices that among the ingredients on the counter was white wine. So, Morales asks Brown about it, and then Al Roker makes it seem like Morales was interested because she wanted to DRINK the wine!!!!! You can watch this classic TV moment here . The Wall Street Journal's Speakeasy blog is running Thanksgiving Tips from the Stars -- here's a recipe for Brussels sprouts with pancetta from Chazz Palminteri, which you can try for yourself at Chazz: A Bronx Original in Baltmore's beautiful Harbor East.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2011
Ten Ten opens Thursday in the Bagby Building. Ten Ten will launch directly into seven-day-a-week lunch and dinner service, with menus credited to executive chef Mark Davis, formerly of Woodfire in Severna Park and the Baltimore Country Club. They were still being tweaked on the eve of the opening.  The dinner menu is a compact and hearty affair, full of bold fall ingredients and flavors. The ten appetizers ($6-$11) include steak tartare, duck-fat fries with chive creme fraiche, Medjool dates wrapped in grilled bacon and seared sea scallops with cauliflower puree.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jasmine Wiggins | March 9, 2011
When I'm making roast chicken, I like to keep everything else very simple. I'll typically roast green beans or asparagus, but this time I decided to go with brussels sprouts. I know not everyone is a fan, but I guess I'm the odd one out. I really like them, and was reminded that I do not eat enough of them, so into the basket they went. Roasted Brussels Sprouts 1 lb brussels sprouts 1/2 tsp pepper 1 tsp salt Balsamic vinegar Heat oven to 400 degrees. Rinse brussels sprouts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2010
Millicent Beal from Jarrettsville was trying to find a recipe she saw in a magazine not long ago for Brussels sprouts with pecans. Barbara Clark from Windsor, Calif., sent in a recipe she had from Cooking Light magazine for making Brussels sprouts that she said she really enjoys. She said that she thinks it "elevates boring Brussels sprouts to a tastier level." Slicing the Brussels sprouts before sautéing cuts done on the cooking time. The addition of sugar and chicken stock give the dish a somewhat sweet yet rich and balanced flavor and the toasted pecans on top finish the dish perfectly.
FEATURES
By Sara Engram | August 15, 2001
Purple reigns Kids may think green food is yucky when it comes in the form of broccoli or brussels sprouts. But Heinz discovered they have a soft spot for the color when it released a green ketchup last year. Now comes Funky Purple, which the heaviest ketchup users - children - tell the company is the coolest color around, what with Harry Potter's purple lightning bolts, purple computers and, we might add, the purple-uniformed Super Bowl champions. We watched with interest as two boys slathered the stuff over french fries.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
For Bryan Voltaggio, this holiday season is about beginnings. His latest restaurant venture - and the first outside Frederick - is slated to open. It will be his family's first Christmas in their new Urbana home. And with a son age 5 and a daughter who's not quite 2, that tender age when he's pretty sure Christmas memories start to truly cement, the chef and father is determined to do it right. No surprise, he'll be making most of it happen in the kitchen - Santa's workshop with cinnamon, nutmeg, orange peel and peppermint.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2008
It was a sad summer in Remington. Dizzy Issie's closed, and, for at least a moment, its fans weren't sure it was coming back. But it has, rechristened The Dizz, and it is totally spruced up. Regulars will take note of the new windows in the front bar and a thorough cleansing, painting and renovation of the downstairs dining room, which mostly just feels more orderly. Some of the more fundamental improvements are either behind the scenes (new kitchen equipment, new heating and air-conditioning equipment)
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to the Sun | July 12, 2008
My tree has some dead branches. Will they come back? I thought I'd give them a year. Once they are truly dead, branches cannot regenerate. Scratch the bark and look underneath for healthy green tissue. If you see none, that indicates death. Dead branches become brittle and break easily. This brittleness starts at the tip of the branch and moves down because water is no longer transported through the branch by the tree. Remove dead branches immediately. Dead wood begins to decay right away.
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