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By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun Staff | October 3, 1991
When Raoul Middleman paints a portrait, his brush strokes have so much expressionistic fervor that the subjects have no choice but to come alive on the canvas. When he paints a landscape, he brings the same vigor to his depictions of Baltimore's gritty industrial heritage.During his long career as a Baltimore artist, Middleman has sought out people and places that are not pretty -- at least by conventional standards. His take on Baltimore will not be found in tourist brochures.As the 56-year-old artist himself pungently points out in a statement for his one-man show at the Jewish Community Center: "I like to paint people who are on the fringe, disenfranchised, alienated, not surrounded by a bunch of bourgeois bric-a-brac."
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By Liz Atwood, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2012
Artist and muralist Pat O'Brien confronts a bare room as she would an engineering project. She takes measurements, makes scale drawings, and plans precisely the colors, fabrics and furnishings she will employ. It all makes perfect sense for the former electrical engineer who used to design systems for military aircraft when she worked at AAI Corp. in Cockeysville. O'Brien's artistic talent will be on display at the Baltimore Symphony Associates decorators' show house, which opens Sunday, April 29. Hers will be the first interior space visitors encounter as they tour the Eck House in Baltimore County's Cromwell Valley Park.
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By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | March 14, 1991
A new name to reckon with on the Baltimore art scene i Spanish artist Salvador Bru, who is having his first local exhibit at the C. Grimaldis Gallery's Morton Street location. Not much contemporary Spanish art is shown in our area, so there should be plenty of curiosity in this case.Bru has lived for a long time in the United States and often exhibited in this country and in Europe. He now lives in Washington and keeps a studio in Baltimore.Looking at his new work takes one back to the surrealism-tinged abstract expressionism of the 1940s.
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By Mike Giuliano | September 6, 2011
Art galleries in Howard County gallop into the fall season with new exhibits whose receptions take place during what promises to be a busy "Road to the Arts" weekend, Sept. 16-18. The exhibits themselves open on various dates, however, so you can map out your own visitation schedule during the month. One of the first shows out of the gate is the annual HCC Faculty Exhibition , filling both the Rouse Company Foundation Gallery and the Art Department Gallery at Howard Community College.
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By Mike Giuliano | September 6, 2011
Art galleries in Howard County gallop into the fall season with new exhibits whose receptions take place during what promises to be a busy "Road to the Arts" weekend, Sept. 16-18. The exhibits themselves open on various dates, however, so you can map out your own visitation schedule during the month. One of the first shows out of the gate is the annual HCC Faculty Exhibition , filling both the Rouse Company Foundation Gallery and the Art Department Gallery at Howard Community College.
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By Elise T. Chisolm | April 5, 1994
Beams of sunlight sift through the wide windows and illuminate the bright red hair that defines her persona. Except for the movement caused by her brush strokes, she is engulfed in a trancelike quietness.Elizabeth Bowersox, artist, is at work. Do not disturb.She is painting this day at the Rockland Art Center in Howard County. Others in the class are talking, she is not. She is painting flowers, her favorites. She says she needs all her facilities to attend to her work in progress -- a fresh bouquet of spring flowers awash with bright colors.
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By Photos by Chiaki Kawajiri and Photos by Chiaki Kawajiri,Sun photographer | January 21, 2008
Mu Jiashan, founder of the Rockville-based Asian Pacific Art Institute and an artist whose works have been shown across the United States and his homeland of China, is preparing for an exhibit to be shown at the World Bank headquarters in Washington on Feb. 4. Mu teaches in Maryland, Virginia and Washington, and has had his pieces shown in more than two dozen solo exhibitions and about 100 group exhibitions.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | January 19, 1993
Anyone who wants to know how much a work of art can tell u about itself and the extent to which it can shed light on the art of its time must see "A Renaissance Puzzle: Heemskerck's 'Abduction of Helen' " at the Walters Art Gallery.Although this spectacular painting has been on view all along at the Walters, it has in a real sense been brought out of hiding by this show, organized by Renaissance curator Joaneath Spicer.By assembling nearly 30 other related works dating from antiquity through the 18th century from the Walters and other collections, the curator has revealed many aspects of the painting's meaning that today's museum-goer is not likely to understand without help.
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By Liz Atwood, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2012
Artist and muralist Pat O'Brien confronts a bare room as she would an engineering project. She takes measurements, makes scale drawings, and plans precisely the colors, fabrics and furnishings she will employ. It all makes perfect sense for the former electrical engineer who used to design systems for military aircraft when she worked at AAI Corp. in Cockeysville. O'Brien's artistic talent will be on display at the Baltimore Symphony Associates decorators' show house, which opens Sunday, April 29. Hers will be the first interior space visitors encounter as they tour the Eck House in Baltimore County's Cromwell Valley Park.
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By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,arthur.hirsch@baltsun.com | August 30, 2009
Matt Zoll really has nothing against the 21st century, or even the 20th. The artist's Baltimore County studio is equipped with electric lights and two desktop computers that suggest his accommodation to the times, even if he paints in a way that much of the art world left behind centuries ago. On his painting days, he drives about 15 minutes from his home in Anneslie to a commercial strip off York Road. Once he shuts his studio door and goes to work, Zoll has turned his back on the march of art history that has occurred since before the Impressionists first rocked the academy in the 19th century.
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By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,arthur.hirsch@baltsun.com | August 30, 2009
Matt Zoll really has nothing against the 21st century, or even the 20th. The artist's Baltimore County studio is equipped with electric lights and two desktop computers that suggest his accommodation to the times, even if he paints in a way that much of the art world left behind centuries ago. On his painting days, he drives about 15 minutes from his home in Anneslie to a commercial strip off York Road. Once he shuts his studio door and goes to work, Zoll has turned his back on the march of art history that has occurred since before the Impressionists first rocked the academy in the 19th century.
NEWS
By Photos by Chiaki Kawajiri and Photos by Chiaki Kawajiri,Sun photographer | January 21, 2008
Mu Jiashan, founder of the Rockville-based Asian Pacific Art Institute and an artist whose works have been shown across the United States and his homeland of China, is preparing for an exhibit to be shown at the World Bank headquarters in Washington on Feb. 4. Mu teaches in Maryland, Virginia and Washington, and has had his pieces shown in more than two dozen solo exhibitions and about 100 group exhibitions.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | May 28, 1997
In his television series "American Visions," Robert Hughes has taken on a huge task -- no less than to tell the story of more than three centuries of American art in eight hours.Amazingly enough, he has done even more than that.In eight beautifully photographed episodes shot at more than 100 locations across the country, he has, in effect, told the story of American history and shown how American art parallels it. He takes us from the Spanish settlement of the Southwest and the Puritan settlement of the Northeast in the 17th century up to the age of anxiety following the fiasco of Vietnam.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | January 11, 1997
When Raoul Middleman talks about painting, it reminds you of the way he paints.He's standing in the middle of his landscape show at the Steven Scott gallery, in front of his painting called "The Quarry," and he says:"Ireelikawayaliyitoserocks."What he's saying is, "I really liked the way that light hit those rocks," but that's not the way it comes out. It comes out all in a rush, with every word gobbling up part of what's next to it in Middleman's hurry to get the thought out. It's a combination of energy, quickness of mind and the urgent need for self-expression.
FEATURES
By Elise T. Chisolm | April 5, 1994
Beams of sunlight sift through the wide windows and illuminate the bright red hair that defines her persona. Except for the movement caused by her brush strokes, she is engulfed in a trancelike quietness.Elizabeth Bowersox, artist, is at work. Do not disturb.She is painting this day at the Rockland Art Center in Howard County. Others in the class are talking, she is not. She is painting flowers, her favorites. She says she needs all her facilities to attend to her work in progress -- a fresh bouquet of spring flowers awash with bright colors.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | January 19, 1993
Anyone who wants to know how much a work of art can tell u about itself and the extent to which it can shed light on the art of its time must see "A Renaissance Puzzle: Heemskerck's 'Abduction of Helen' " at the Walters Art Gallery.Although this spectacular painting has been on view all along at the Walters, it has in a real sense been brought out of hiding by this show, organized by Renaissance curator Joaneath Spicer.By assembling nearly 30 other related works dating from antiquity through the 18th century from the Walters and other collections, the curator has revealed many aspects of the painting's meaning that today's museum-goer is not likely to understand without help.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | May 28, 1997
In his television series "American Visions," Robert Hughes has taken on a huge task -- no less than to tell the story of more than three centuries of American art in eight hours.Amazingly enough, he has done even more than that.In eight beautifully photographed episodes shot at more than 100 locations across the country, he has, in effect, told the story of American history and shown how American art parallels it. He takes us from the Spanish settlement of the Southwest and the Puritan settlement of the Northeast in the 17th century up to the age of anxiety following the fiasco of Vietnam.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | January 11, 1997
When Raoul Middleman talks about painting, it reminds you of the way he paints.He's standing in the middle of his landscape show at the Steven Scott gallery, in front of his painting called "The Quarry," and he says:"Ireelikawayaliyitoserocks."What he's saying is, "I really liked the way that light hit those rocks," but that's not the way it comes out. It comes out all in a rush, with every word gobbling up part of what's next to it in Middleman's hurry to get the thought out. It's a combination of energy, quickness of mind and the urgent need for self-expression.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun Staff | October 3, 1991
When Raoul Middleman paints a portrait, his brush strokes have so much expressionistic fervor that the subjects have no choice but to come alive on the canvas. When he paints a landscape, he brings the same vigor to his depictions of Baltimore's gritty industrial heritage.During his long career as a Baltimore artist, Middleman has sought out people and places that are not pretty -- at least by conventional standards. His take on Baltimore will not be found in tourist brochures.As the 56-year-old artist himself pungently points out in a statement for his one-man show at the Jewish Community Center: "I like to paint people who are on the fringe, disenfranchised, alienated, not surrounded by a bunch of bourgeois bric-a-brac."
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | March 14, 1991
A new name to reckon with on the Baltimore art scene i Spanish artist Salvador Bru, who is having his first local exhibit at the C. Grimaldis Gallery's Morton Street location. Not much contemporary Spanish art is shown in our area, so there should be plenty of curiosity in this case.Bru has lived for a long time in the United States and often exhibited in this country and in Europe. He now lives in Washington and keeps a studio in Baltimore.Looking at his new work takes one back to the surrealism-tinged abstract expressionism of the 1940s.
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