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Brunswick Stew

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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | June 23, 2004
JoAnn McKenney of Spencer, N.C., briefly noted that she was seeking a recipe for Brunswick Stew that had chicken in it. Harriet Boysen of Penngrove, Calif., responded. "The recipe is from The New Doubleday Cookbook [1985 edition]. I have used this recipe innumerable times and it is wonderful on a cold, nasty day. Also, the aroma throughout the house adds to the enjoyment of the dish." Brunswick Stew Serves 12 to 15 1 six-pound stewing hen or capon, cleaned 1 gallon cold water 2 stalks celery 1 tablespoon sugar 5 medium potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/2 -inch cubes 3 medium yellow onions, peeled and coarsely chopped 6 large, ripe tomatoes, peeled, cored, seeded and chopped two 10-ounce packages frozen baby lima beans (do not thaw)
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NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 3, 2005
There are two main culinary ways of dealing with the dog days of summer. There's the cool approach - gazpacho, smoked salmon and fruit salad, which is fine if you like that kind of thing. And then there's barbecue. Hey, you're going to be hot, so why not go all the way, with smoky, peppery, vinegary, artery-busting food? And nobody exemplifies this he-man approach more than No. 52, Mr. Ray Lewis. Which explains why we trudged out into the oppressive late-afternoon air the other day to hit Canton and Ray Lewis' Full Moon Bar-B-Que.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1995
What! No turkey?It is Brunswick stew time, according to the request of L. J. of Essex, who writes that she believes the dish is made with chicken and vegetables.The origin of this stew is worth noting. According to "Food Lover's Companion" (Barron's Educational Series, 1990), it originated in Brunswick County, Va., in about 1828 and was a hearty stew made of squirrel meat and onions. Today it is generally made with rabbit or chicken and contains such vegetables as okra, lima beans, tomatoes and corn.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | June 23, 2004
JoAnn McKenney of Spencer, N.C., briefly noted that she was seeking a recipe for Brunswick Stew that had chicken in it. Harriet Boysen of Penngrove, Calif., responded. "The recipe is from The New Doubleday Cookbook [1985 edition]. I have used this recipe innumerable times and it is wonderful on a cold, nasty day. Also, the aroma throughout the house adds to the enjoyment of the dish." Brunswick Stew Serves 12 to 15 1 six-pound stewing hen or capon, cleaned 1 gallon cold water 2 stalks celery 1 tablespoon sugar 5 medium potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/2 -inch cubes 3 medium yellow onions, peeled and coarsely chopped 6 large, ripe tomatoes, peeled, cored, seeded and chopped two 10-ounce packages frozen baby lima beans (do not thaw)
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | September 18, 1991
This wonderful recipe makes my mouth water! It's for Beth Hannon of Baltimore. The recipe was sent to us by Charlene Pederson of Baltimore.German Sweet Chocolate Pie 1 4-ounce package Baker's German's sweet chocolate1/3 cup milk2 tablespoons sugar, optional1 3-ounce package cream cheese, softened3 1/2 cups cool whip, thawed1 graham cracker crustHeat chocolate and two tablespoons milk in saucepan over low heat, stirring until chocolate is melted. Beat sugar into cream cheese and add remaining milk and chocolate mixture and beat until smooth.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | July 19, 2001
Many restaurants tout their regional American cuisine, but Todd Bricken goes them one better. He's the new owner of the restaurant that was the Quail Ridge Inn in Mount Airy, and is now the Brick Ridge (6212 Ridge Road). Every week he and chef Jody Francisco, formerly at Henninger's, pick a state, read up on its traditional dishes and offer some of them as specials. Last week, for instance, Delaware's seafood and stuffed ham were featured. The standard menu lists dishes with their states of origins in parentheses, such as Brunswick stew (Virginia)
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | January 28, 2004
ON THE FOOTBALL field in Houston, it will be the New England Patriots versus the Carolina Panthers. But in the kitchens of America, it will be lobster versus pig, "stuffies" versus Brunswick stew, Indian pudding versus banana pudding. That is how the battle of the buffet, the war of regional foods, the bragging rights over whose Super Bowl spread tastes better, shapes up for this Sunday. To whet my appetite for the Super Bowl, which, as all serious eaters know, is among the biggest chow-down days of the year, I telephoned a few cooks and chefs in Charlotte, N.C., and Boston.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 3, 2005
There are two main culinary ways of dealing with the dog days of summer. There's the cool approach - gazpacho, smoked salmon and fruit salad, which is fine if you like that kind of thing. And then there's barbecue. Hey, you're going to be hot, so why not go all the way, with smoky, peppery, vinegary, artery-busting food? And nobody exemplifies this he-man approach more than No. 52, Mr. Ray Lewis. Which explains why we trudged out into the oppressive late-afternoon air the other day to hit Canton and Ray Lewis' Full Moon Bar-B-Que.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | January 8, 1992
Maybe it's a reaction to duck sausages and designer pizzas, a mass allergy to some of those fancy foods of the '80s. But Americans in the '90s have gone home, to home cooking, to American regional cuisine, the food that generations of moms brought to the table.Tired of delicately arranged pea pods, we find ourselves craving red flannel hash, fried tomatoes, New England clam chowder, Texas chili, deviled crab and chicken pot pies.But when we pull out the recipes we got from Mom and Grandma and Uncle Eddie and cook them up, it seems like something's wrong.
FEATURES
By Carleton Jones | November 13, 1991
YOU CAN GIVE SOME RECIPES in a single sentence. Others can be told in two or three sentences.At our house the stew, a beef burgundy, is a three-sentencer. It goes like this:Take a pound or two of sirloin tips and brown them in butter or oil. Throw in some chopped potatoes and onions and about 3 cups of water and a measuring cup of burgundy or any stout red wine. Put on a lid and turn the heat way down to a low simmer.You can go to a movie or take a long nap, and still end up with a dish that is as good as you'll get in many restaurants.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | January 28, 2004
ON THE FOOTBALL field in Houston, it will be the New England Patriots versus the Carolina Panthers. But in the kitchens of America, it will be lobster versus pig, "stuffies" versus Brunswick stew, Indian pudding versus banana pudding. That is how the battle of the buffet, the war of regional foods, the bragging rights over whose Super Bowl spread tastes better, shapes up for this Sunday. To whet my appetite for the Super Bowl, which, as all serious eaters know, is among the biggest chow-down days of the year, I telephoned a few cooks and chefs in Charlotte, N.C., and Boston.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | July 19, 2001
Many restaurants tout their regional American cuisine, but Todd Bricken goes them one better. He's the new owner of the restaurant that was the Quail Ridge Inn in Mount Airy, and is now the Brick Ridge (6212 Ridge Road). Every week he and chef Jody Francisco, formerly at Henninger's, pick a state, read up on its traditional dishes and offer some of them as specials. Last week, for instance, Delaware's seafood and stuffed ham were featured. The standard menu lists dishes with their states of origins in parentheses, such as Brunswick stew (Virginia)
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1995
What! No turkey?It is Brunswick stew time, according to the request of L. J. of Essex, who writes that she believes the dish is made with chicken and vegetables.The origin of this stew is worth noting. According to "Food Lover's Companion" (Barron's Educational Series, 1990), it originated in Brunswick County, Va., in about 1828 and was a hearty stew made of squirrel meat and onions. Today it is generally made with rabbit or chicken and contains such vegetables as okra, lima beans, tomatoes and corn.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | January 8, 1992
Maybe it's a reaction to duck sausages and designer pizzas, a mass allergy to some of those fancy foods of the '80s. But Americans in the '90s have gone home, to home cooking, to American regional cuisine, the food that generations of moms brought to the table.Tired of delicately arranged pea pods, we find ourselves craving red flannel hash, fried tomatoes, New England clam chowder, Texas chili, deviled crab and chicken pot pies.But when we pull out the recipes we got from Mom and Grandma and Uncle Eddie and cook them up, it seems like something's wrong.
FEATURES
By Carleton Jones | November 13, 1991
YOU CAN GIVE SOME RECIPES in a single sentence. Others can be told in two or three sentences.At our house the stew, a beef burgundy, is a three-sentencer. It goes like this:Take a pound or two of sirloin tips and brown them in butter or oil. Throw in some chopped potatoes and onions and about 3 cups of water and a measuring cup of burgundy or any stout red wine. Put on a lid and turn the heat way down to a low simmer.You can go to a movie or take a long nap, and still end up with a dish that is as good as you'll get in many restaurants.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | September 18, 1991
This wonderful recipe makes my mouth water! It's for Beth Hannon of Baltimore. The recipe was sent to us by Charlene Pederson of Baltimore.German Sweet Chocolate Pie 1 4-ounce package Baker's German's sweet chocolate1/3 cup milk2 tablespoons sugar, optional1 3-ounce package cream cheese, softened3 1/2 cups cool whip, thawed1 graham cracker crustHeat chocolate and two tablespoons milk in saucepan over low heat, stirring until chocolate is melted. Beat sugar into cream cheese and add remaining milk and chocolate mixture and beat until smooth.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2003
Mary Gary of Petaluma, Calif., requested a recipe for Cherry Bars, which her mother made. "They had maraschino cherries in the filling and were made with sugar and eggs." Dorothy Kelley of Reisterstown responded with a recipe that she says "was given to me in 1975." Cherry Bars Makes 9 to 12 bars CRUST: 1/2 cup butter or margarine 1 cup flour 2 teaspoons powdered sugar FILLING: 2 eggs 1/4 cup flour 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 cup chopped nuts 1 cup maraschino cherries, drained and halved TOPPING: one 8-ounce package cream cheese 1 1/2 cups powdered sugar 1/2 teaspoon vanilla 2 teaspoons almond extract 1/2 cup uncooked oatmeal Cream together crust ingredients and press into the bottom of an 8-inch-by-8-inch pan. Bake at 350 degrees for 8 minutes or until lightly browned.
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