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NEWS
July 12, 2004
Mrs. JOYCE LIPPERT BRUMBAUGH, 84, of Winston-Salem passed away peacefully Saturday, July 10, 2004 at the Kate B. Reynolds Hospice Home. Joyce was born on February 5, 1920 in Baltimore, Maryland. She is survived by her devoted husband of 61 years, Edward W. Brumbaugh, her three children, Joy Baldwin and husband Woody of Durham, NC, Wayne Brumbaugh and wife Jane of Huntersville, NC, Gayle Ford and husband Mike of Winston-Salem, NC, and her brother Richard E. Lippert and wife Susan of Bel Air, Maryland.
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NEWS
By Mary Ellen Graybill and Mary Ellen Graybill,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 2007
It's a very tough thing to make a living at. If I hadn't gotten into computers, I'd be a starving artist," said Gary Peddicord, a popular Howard County-based artist who loves to paint historic sites in Elkridge such as Wesley Grove United Methodist Church, the Thomas Viaduct and the Brumbaugh House. Peddicord has earned his living since 1985 as a senior graphics designer, using computers in his work with the defense-contracting industry. Living with his wife, Linda, in the oldest townhouse development in Elkridge, where his ancestors settled in the early 1700s, he has had a front-row seat as subtle changes came to historical buildings.
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NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 12, 2004
LIKE SO MANY Elkridge residents, Neal Sybert was a "Brumbaugh baby." So were four of his six children. These days, Sybert -- a former lawyer, judge and state's attorney -- is president of the Elk Ridge Heritage Society, which has its headquarters in the former home and office of Dr. Benjamin Bruce Brumbaugh. The building serves as a museum of Elkridge history and pays homage to Brumbaugh, who worked as a family doctor in Elkridge from 1919 to 1980. After Brumbaugh died in 1985, the society, which was founded in 1980, bought the building.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2005
This time a year ago I was kayaking alongside reefs of native bay oysters in Virginia's Lynnhaven Inlet, near where the Chesapeake meets the Atlantic. "Lynnhavens" once were known throughout the oyster-eating world, prized by gourmets, slurped by presidents and allegedly served on the Titanic and other luxury liners. But there was scarcely a live oyster to be found there by the mid-1990s, when Rob Brumbaugh, a Chesapeake Bay Foundation scientist, would take kids there for environmental education.
NEWS
June 28, 2004
The Elk Ridge Heritage Society Ltd. received a $2,500 matching grant from the Columbia Foundation and is seeking funds to match it. The grant will help pay for repairs to the society's headquarters, Brumbaugh House, at 5825 Main St. in Elkridge. Dr. Benjamin Bruce Brumbaugh, an Elkridge family physician for 61 years, delivered generations of "Brumbaugh babies," said by some to be half the babies in Elkridge. Now the society hopes those former babies will step forward with donations equal to their ages, to help preserve Brumbaugh's house and memory.
NEWS
By JEAN LESLIE | January 30, 1995
The day I got in touch with Jack Bateman, the winter weather was rainy, raw and blustery. Yet he and friend Todd Robbins had been on top of the annex at Elk Ridge Heritage Society, preparing the roof for reshingling.The oldest shingles they removed were 70 years old.Mr. Bateman is the president of Elk Ridge Heritage Society. He manages a membership of more than 130 and tends to the upkeep and improvements of Brumbaugh House, where the society maintains records and a small museum.The society purchased Brumbaugh House in 1986 from the heirs of Dr. Bruce Brumbaugh, who had been caring for the community's medical needs for more than 40 years when he died.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2001
John M. Brumbaugh, who educated generations of lawyers at the University of Maryland, died Friday at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson of a heart attack. He was 74. Mr. Brumbaugh had lived in Roland Park before moving to the Fairhaven retirement community in Sykesville three years ago. In 1956, he joined the faculty at the University of Maryland School of Law, where he taught criminal law, evidence, trademarks, unfair competition and patent law. He retired in 1996, when he was named distinguished service scholar emeritus, but continued to teach.
NEWS
By Information for this column was compiled by Diane Mullaly from the files of the Howard County Historical Society's Library | March 19, 1995
25 Years Ago (week of March 8-14, 1970)* The Elkridge Rotary Club requested that the Howard County Department of Public Works change the name of Lateral Avenue in Elkridge to Brumbaugh Street. The organization wished to honor local physician Bruce Brumbaugh, M.D., who had served as the community's general practitioner for more than 50 years.* A public hearing was held for a proposed "conflict of interest" bill introduced before the County Council. In addition to defining and prohibiting various forms of conflict of interest, the bill demanded full disclosure of the personal holdings of elected and appointed officials in the county government.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | August 13, 2002
GERALD Miller Jr. was a real good piece of work. He resides now somewhere in the bowels of the Maryland prison system. In a world of eye-for-an-eye justice, he should stay there until he reaches the age of his victims. One, the oldest, was a 94-year old woman. Another victim was 84. He was the youngest. Miller, 39, was an insurance salesman who went bad. His employer, United American Insurance Co., fired him in July of last year after some clients started complaining. So Miller got a swell idea: He could still collect clients' premiums - he'd just keep the money for himself.
NEWS
October 25, 1990
These obituaries were provided by area funeral homes. If information hasn't been published about someone in your family who has passed away, please call Deborah Toich at 761-1732 or 332-6211 or (800) 829-8000, Ext. 6211; you may also fax your information to us at 332-6677.Funeral services took place for former Glen Burnie resident Sophie D. Scheff on Oct. 24 at Singleton Funeral Home.Mrs. Scheff, 55, died Oct. 21 in Baltimore.A homemaker, she enjoyed reading and horticulture.She is survived by a son, Bruce E. Scheff of Florida; two daughters, Denise M. Lembach of Brooklyn and Susan R. Parks of Violetville; a brother, Joseph E. Chamberlain of Denton; two sisters, Elizabeth R. Martin and Dorothy R. Shell, both of Baltimore; and five grandchildren.
NEWS
July 12, 2004
Mrs. JOYCE LIPPERT BRUMBAUGH, 84, of Winston-Salem passed away peacefully Saturday, July 10, 2004 at the Kate B. Reynolds Hospice Home. Joyce was born on February 5, 1920 in Baltimore, Maryland. She is survived by her devoted husband of 61 years, Edward W. Brumbaugh, her three children, Joy Baldwin and husband Woody of Durham, NC, Wayne Brumbaugh and wife Jane of Huntersville, NC, Gayle Ford and husband Mike of Winston-Salem, NC, and her brother Richard E. Lippert and wife Susan of Bel Air, Maryland.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 12, 2004
LIKE SO MANY Elkridge residents, Neal Sybert was a "Brumbaugh baby." So were four of his six children. These days, Sybert -- a former lawyer, judge and state's attorney -- is president of the Elk Ridge Heritage Society, which has its headquarters in the former home and office of Dr. Benjamin Bruce Brumbaugh. The building serves as a museum of Elkridge history and pays homage to Brumbaugh, who worked as a family doctor in Elkridge from 1919 to 1980. After Brumbaugh died in 1985, the society, which was founded in 1980, bought the building.
NEWS
June 28, 2004
The Elk Ridge Heritage Society Ltd. received a $2,500 matching grant from the Columbia Foundation and is seeking funds to match it. The grant will help pay for repairs to the society's headquarters, Brumbaugh House, at 5825 Main St. in Elkridge. Dr. Benjamin Bruce Brumbaugh, an Elkridge family physician for 61 years, delivered generations of "Brumbaugh babies," said by some to be half the babies in Elkridge. Now the society hopes those former babies will step forward with donations equal to their ages, to help preserve Brumbaugh's house and memory.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | August 13, 2002
GERALD Miller Jr. was a real good piece of work. He resides now somewhere in the bowels of the Maryland prison system. In a world of eye-for-an-eye justice, he should stay there until he reaches the age of his victims. One, the oldest, was a 94-year old woman. Another victim was 84. He was the youngest. Miller, 39, was an insurance salesman who went bad. His employer, United American Insurance Co., fired him in July of last year after some clients started complaining. So Miller got a swell idea: He could still collect clients' premiums - he'd just keep the money for himself.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2001
John M. Brumbaugh, who educated generations of lawyers at the University of Maryland, died Friday at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson of a heart attack. He was 74. Mr. Brumbaugh had lived in Roland Park before moving to the Fairhaven retirement community in Sykesville three years ago. In 1956, he joined the faculty at the University of Maryland School of Law, where he taught criminal law, evidence, trademarks, unfair competition and patent law. He retired in 1996, when he was named distinguished service scholar emeritus, but continued to teach.
NEWS
By Diane Mullaly from the files of the Howard County Historical Society's library | April 28, 1996
25 years ago (week of April 25-May 1, 1971):County Executive Omar J. Jones presented his proposed operating budget for the coming fiscal year. The budget, a record $24,114,422, included a recommendation to reduce the property tax rate from $2.85 to $2.75 per $100 of assessed value.School board President Fred K. Schoenbrodt criticized the county executive's $900,000 reduction of the proposed education budget for 1971-72. The cuts would come from funds set aside for instructional materials, including library books for new schools, as well as from teacher salaries.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | February 19, 1992
Lifelong pals Mary Jane Brumbaugh and Marlene Sponaugle hope their 42-year-old friendship will survive their new relationship as businesspartners.The two 48-year-old Washington County women will soon open Double M Restaurant on East Baltimore Street where, they say, a family can have a home-cooked meal for a reasonable price.That theme of family food has also been adopted by another new restaurant here, the Taneytown Family Restaurant, which replaced Leonardi's on the square last month."We want to keep the restaurant very family-oriented," said Brian Smith, one of the owners of the Taneytown Family Restaurant.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2005
This time a year ago I was kayaking alongside reefs of native bay oysters in Virginia's Lynnhaven Inlet, near where the Chesapeake meets the Atlantic. "Lynnhavens" once were known throughout the oyster-eating world, prized by gourmets, slurped by presidents and allegedly served on the Titanic and other luxury liners. But there was scarcely a live oyster to be found there by the mid-1990s, when Rob Brumbaugh, a Chesapeake Bay Foundation scientist, would take kids there for environmental education.
NEWS
By Information for this column was compiled by Diane Mullaly from the files of the Howard County Historical Society's Library | March 19, 1995
25 Years Ago (week of March 8-14, 1970)* The Elkridge Rotary Club requested that the Howard County Department of Public Works change the name of Lateral Avenue in Elkridge to Brumbaugh Street. The organization wished to honor local physician Bruce Brumbaugh, M.D., who had served as the community's general practitioner for more than 50 years.* A public hearing was held for a proposed "conflict of interest" bill introduced before the County Council. In addition to defining and prohibiting various forms of conflict of interest, the bill demanded full disclosure of the personal holdings of elected and appointed officials in the county government.
NEWS
By JEAN LESLIE | January 30, 1995
The day I got in touch with Jack Bateman, the winter weather was rainy, raw and blustery. Yet he and friend Todd Robbins had been on top of the annex at Elk Ridge Heritage Society, preparing the roof for reshingling.The oldest shingles they removed were 70 years old.Mr. Bateman is the president of Elk Ridge Heritage Society. He manages a membership of more than 130 and tends to the upkeep and improvements of Brumbaugh House, where the society maintains records and a small museum.The society purchased Brumbaugh House in 1986 from the heirs of Dr. Bruce Brumbaugh, who had been caring for the community's medical needs for more than 40 years when he died.
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