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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2013
There has been a change in the lineup for the second production in Everyman Theatre's new home -- Yasmina Reza's bitingly funny "God of Carnage. " Due to a shoulder injury, resident company member Bruce Randolph Nelson had to bow out. The role of Alan Raleigh, half of one of the two tense couples at the heart of the play, will now be performed by Tim Getman. (Nelson is expected to be back onstage as scheduled for Everyman's season finale, George Farquhar 's "The Beaux' Stratagem.
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b staff | December 18, 2013
Yes, the theater scene in Baltimore is ever-growing and diversifying. But it also prides itself on being collaborative and supportive of each other. We asked some of our favorites in theater to share their favorite on-stage moments (other than their own) of 2013. In March, I was able to see Glass Mind Theatre Company's production of “A House, A Home,” a reimagined Chekhov's “Three Sisters” by Ben Hoover. Two of the major artistic forces behind the show, adapter/director Hoover, and Glass Mind artistic director and lead actor Andrew Peters, have since gone on to competitive masters programs in NYC and Chicago (a testament to the amazing incubation powers of Baltimore's untamed theatre scene)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
Bruce Nelson, a longtime Baltimore favorite on the stage, goes macabre for his latest role - the title literary giant in "The Completely Fictional - Utterly True - Final Strange Tale of Edgar Allan Poe. " We'll give you a break after reading that. Still with us? The play, running now through Nov. 25 at Center Stage , focuses on Poe's weird (of course) final days before his mysterious death (again, of course) in Baltimore. And since he's playing the rascally Poe, we had some rascally questions of our own. Thankfully, he brought up Poe marrying his teenage cousin on his own. 1. The title of this play is very intriguing and a bit confusing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
It's talky, contrived and a little creaky, but John Logan's "Red," the two-actor play on the boards at Everyman Theatre , is also remarkably absorbing, even uplifting. Who knew art history could be so much fun? Sorry, that sounds flip. And "Red" is anything but flip. The Tony Award-winning work, set in the late 1950s, conjures up an encounter with Mark Rothko, the celebrated abstract expressionist who created the equivalent of epic operas from vast fields of color. On a single canvas, a few painstakingly applied shades interact with and within each other.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
It's talky, contrived and a little creaky, but John Logan's "Red," the two-actor play on the boards at Everyman Theatre , is also remarkably absorbing, even uplifting. Who knew art history could be so much fun? Sorry, that sounds flip. And "Red" is anything but flip. The Tony Award-winning work, set in the late 1950s, conjures up an encounter with Mark Rothko, the celebrated abstract expressionist who created the equivalent of epic operas from vast fields of color. On a single canvas, a few painstakingly applied shades interact with and within each other.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | January 18, 1995
SAN DIEGO -- When Annie Nelson left here yesterday at 6 a.m. for a morning run with the America3 America's Cup team, her husband, Bruce, said he told her, "Good luck, honey. Enjoy your workout. I think I'll roll over and sleep another 30 minutes."Six hours later, Bruce and Annie Nelson were on the Pacific Ocean off Point Loma -- preparing to sail against one another in the Citizen Cup defender elimination trials.Bruce, who is 42, was aboard PACT '95 as a replacement strategist, and Annie, 35, had been rotated in as navigator aboard America3.
ENTERTAINMENT
b staff | December 18, 2013
Yes, the theater scene in Baltimore is ever-growing and diversifying. But it also prides itself on being collaborative and supportive of each other. We asked some of our favorites in theater to share their favorite on-stage moments (other than their own) of 2013. In March, I was able to see Glass Mind Theatre Company's production of “A House, A Home,” a reimagined Chekhov's “Three Sisters” by Ben Hoover. Two of the major artistic forces behind the show, adapter/director Hoover, and Glass Mind artistic director and lead actor Andrew Peters, have since gone on to competitive masters programs in NYC and Chicago (a testament to the amazing incubation powers of Baltimore's untamed theatre scene)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2013
For his first full season as Center Stage artistic director, Kwame Kwei-Armah focused on works that could spark conversation about a variety of heady issues. Midway through that season, he has unveiled a very different theme for the next one. "If this season is cerebral, with the join-the-conversation message, [2013-2014] is one of spirit and joy and fun, I'm hoping," Kwei-Armah said. "I have been traveling a lot and looking at productions across the country. I have seen audiences react to several of these plays, which gives me the security to present them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | January 4, 2009
The man in the black cotton skirt and kerchief plucks the string of pearls hanging around his neck. His fingers probe cautiously the area over his heart, as if to determine if that organ has remained intact. Charlotte von Mahlsdorf, Berlin's controversial "tranny granny," was a transvestite, folk hero and police informant who died in 2002. But she will step onto the Everyman Theatre stage this month in the person of actor Bruce Nelson, who is starring in a one-performer play called I A m My Own Wife that is based on her life story.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Houppert and Karen Houppert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2009
I Am My Own Wife is the true (or not) story of a man (or not) who survived the Nazis and resisted the East German Stasi (or didn't) to live as a transvestite for more than 30 years in Berlin, ultimately becoming the darling of the European press after the Berlin Wall came down. Confused? A precision performance by Everyman Theatre's Bruce Nelson actually makes all of this abundantly clear as he plays Berlin's most famous transvestite, Charlotte von Mahlsdorf - and the 34 other characters in playwright Doug Wright's one-person show.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2013
There has been a change in the lineup for the second production in Everyman Theatre's new home -- Yasmina Reza's bitingly funny "God of Carnage. " Due to a shoulder injury, resident company member Bruce Randolph Nelson had to bow out. The role of Alan Raleigh, half of one of the two tense couples at the heart of the play, will now be performed by Tim Getman. (Nelson is expected to be back onstage as scheduled for Everyman's season finale, George Farquhar 's "The Beaux' Stratagem.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2013
For his first full season as Center Stage artistic director, Kwame Kwei-Armah focused on works that could spark conversation about a variety of heady issues. Midway through that season, he has unveiled a very different theme for the next one. "If this season is cerebral, with the join-the-conversation message, [2013-2014] is one of spirit and joy and fun, I'm hoping," Kwei-Armah said. "I have been traveling a lot and looking at productions across the country. I have seen audiences react to several of these plays, which gives me the security to present them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
Bruce Nelson, a longtime Baltimore favorite on the stage, goes macabre for his latest role - the title literary giant in "The Completely Fictional - Utterly True - Final Strange Tale of Edgar Allan Poe. " We'll give you a break after reading that. Still with us? The play, running now through Nov. 25 at Center Stage , focuses on Poe's weird (of course) final days before his mysterious death (again, of course) in Baltimore. And since he's playing the rascally Poe, we had some rascally questions of our own. Thankfully, he brought up Poe marrying his teenage cousin on his own. 1. The title of this play is very intriguing and a bit confusing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Houppert and Karen Houppert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2009
I Am My Own Wife is the true (or not) story of a man (or not) who survived the Nazis and resisted the East German Stasi (or didn't) to live as a transvestite for more than 30 years in Berlin, ultimately becoming the darling of the European press after the Berlin Wall came down. Confused? A precision performance by Everyman Theatre's Bruce Nelson actually makes all of this abundantly clear as he plays Berlin's most famous transvestite, Charlotte von Mahlsdorf - and the 34 other characters in playwright Doug Wright's one-person show.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | January 4, 2009
The man in the black cotton skirt and kerchief plucks the string of pearls hanging around his neck. His fingers probe cautiously the area over his heart, as if to determine if that organ has remained intact. Charlotte von Mahlsdorf, Berlin's controversial "tranny granny," was a transvestite, folk hero and police informant who died in 2002. But she will step onto the Everyman Theatre stage this month in the person of actor Bruce Nelson, who is starring in a one-performer play called I A m My Own Wife that is based on her life story.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | January 18, 1995
SAN DIEGO -- When Annie Nelson left here yesterday at 6 a.m. for a morning run with the America3 America's Cup team, her husband, Bruce, said he told her, "Good luck, honey. Enjoy your workout. I think I'll roll over and sleep another 30 minutes."Six hours later, Bruce and Annie Nelson were on the Pacific Ocean off Point Loma -- preparing to sail against one another in the Citizen Cup defender elimination trials.Bruce, who is 42, was aboard PACT '95 as a replacement strategist, and Annie, 35, had been rotated in as navigator aboard America3.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 6, 2001
`Watch on the Rhine' opens at Everyman Everyman Theatre opens its 11th season tonight with Lillian Hellman's 1941 drama, Watch on the Rhine. The Nazi threat hits home when Sara Muller and her German, anti-Fascist husband seek refuge with Sara's mother, who lives just outside Washington. Tana Hicken, who played Sara in Center Stage's 1980 production, now plays the mother. Deborah Hazlett and Bruce Nelson co-star. Direction is by Donald Hicken, head of the theater department at the Baltimore School for the Arts (and Tana's husband)
NEWS
April 20, 2007
On April 19, 2007, CARL EDWARD NELSON, SR., beloved husband of Jean M. Nelson (nee Trabert), devoted father of Carl E. Nelson, Jr., Bruce Nelson, Brian Nelson, Beverly Chaney, Denise Talbert and Wayne Nelson; dear brother of Walter Nelson. Also survived by eight grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. A Christian Wake Service will be held at the family owned Duda-Ruck Funeral Home of Dundalk, Inc., 7922 Wise Avenue on Friday at 8:30 P.M. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at Our Lady of Hope Church on Saturday at 10 A.M. Interment Oak Lawn Cemetery.
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