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ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick and Scott Hettrick,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 10, 1993
DRAGON: THE BRUCE LEE STORYMCA/Universal, rated PG-13 1993Tackling a biography of an entertainment personality is loaded with difficult choices, from the approach to casting to deciding on which aspects of the subject's private and professional life to focus.The producers of "Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story" faced the added challenge of dramatizing the life of a legend, whose career has been well-documented in the 20 years since his tragic and sudden death, which remains shrouded in mystery.Unfortunately, the movie gets off to a bad start.
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By Tom Jicha and Tom Jicha,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | January 5, 2005
Alias knows how to capture the audience's attention, at least the male portion of it. The tardy fourth-season premiere opens with Jennifer Garner, as ultra-cool, extremely hot CIA agent Sydney Bristow, cavorting at length in tantalizing white lingerie. Holding a crowd, especially newcomers, might be another matter. ABC has been aggressively promoting the relaunch of Alias with the tagline, "It's not that complicated." They lie. If anything, Alias is more complicated than ever. The return episode is mired in the series' dense mythology and there's a "nothing is as it seems" twist at the very top of the show that will confound the most avid fans.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 7, 1993
Now and then the movies conjure up an authentic demon, someone whose energy is so vivid, whose way of moving is so radical, whose attitude is so harsh, that he declares himself essential inNow and then the movies conjure up an authentic demon, someone whose energy is so vivid, whose way of moving is so radical, whose attitude is so harsh, that he declares himself essential in the first few seconds.And so it was with the Chinese-American star Bruce Lee, who blazed ever so briefly and ever so brightly in the early '70s.
FEATURES
By Mark McGuire and Mark McGuire,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 2, 2002
Dead for almost 29 years now, martial arts legend Bruce Lee still commands attention on the screen. Perhaps it was his smile/sneer, an expression that conveyed both baleful threat toward bad guys and the unassailable certainty that they were going down. Or maybe it was the eyes, which danced between amusement and a sort of remorseless contempt. His body - just over 5-foot-7 and violin-string taut - was every bit as expressive, capable of grace and the sort of kinetic display that seemed to push the boundaries of physical possibility.
FEATURES
By Mark McGuire and Mark McGuire,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 2, 2002
Dead for almost 29 years now, martial arts legend Bruce Lee still commands attention on the screen. Perhaps it was his smile/sneer, an expression that conveyed both baleful threat toward bad guys and the unassailable certainty that they were going down. Or maybe it was the eyes, which danced between amusement and a sort of remorseless contempt. His body - just over 5-foot-7 and violin-string taut - was every bit as expressive, capable of grace and the sort of kinetic display that seemed to push the boundaries of physical possibility.
FEATURES
By Fort Worth Star-Telegram | August 25, 1992
There is a priceless moment in "Rapid Fire," where Brandon Lee is transformed by anger from a scared college kid to a vengeful fighting machine. Co-star Powers Boothe, playing an older and wiser heroic sort, advises Mr. Lee to calm down and get his "fists of fury" under control.The reference may sail right over the heads of the customers who don't keep track of such things. But it's a small treat for the fans: Mr. Boothe's line in "Rapid Fire," which opened at area theaters Friday, is a nod to Lo Wei's "Fists of Fury" (China; 1972)
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1996
An 18-year-old Severn man was convicted of assault and battery in Anne Arundel Circuit Court yesterday for punching a youth last summer while imitating a Bruce Lee karate movie the defendant had just watched with some friends.Joe N. Rider of the 1800 block of Montreal Road pleaded not guilty in the Aug. 16 attack on Anthony Sherer, but was convicted by Judge Raymond G. Thieme Jr. after prosecutors read a statement of facts.Rider is to be sentenced March 1.Assistant State's Attorney Warren W. Davis III said the victim, then 15, was talking to a neighbor in front of his house in the 1700 block of Village Square about 10:15 p.m. when Rider and two acquaintances attacked him.Anthony was hit at least three times in the head, Mr. Davis said.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1996
A Severn man who imitated what he saw in a Bruce Lee karate movie pleaded guilty Friday in Anne Arundel Circuit Court to bashing in the face of a youth last summer.Charles Randolph, 18, of the 1800 block of Quebec Road, who was convicted of assault with intent to maim, will be sentenced Feb. 27 by Judge Raymond G. Thieme Jr.Randolph attacked Anthony Scherer, 15, near his home in the 1700 block of Village Square Court in Severn on Aug. 16. Police say two others also attacked the boy.The youth underwent 10 hours of surgery for a concussion and other head injuries at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | February 12, 1997
Eric Easton says we media folks have it all wrong. He says there we go again, blowing things out of proportion, inventing a crisis where none exists. He didn't quite suggest that we should all be tarred, feathered and run out of town. But he didn't say he was agin it, either.Easton is one of the guys who demonstrated to have Canaan Discount Food Market closed in November. The issue, Easton and the others have insisted all along, was bad food. But there have been charges that the demonstrators had racial motivations, that their problem with Canaan was not bad food but its Korean owner, Eun Mu Lee.Easton wants all of Baltimore to know that he patronizes Korean merchants frequently, thank you very much, probably more so ** than some of the folks who criticized the Canaan pickets.
FEATURES
By Gene Stout and Gene Stout,Seattle Post-Intelligencer | July 5, 1995
There's no rest for grunge-rock martyrs, as Courtney Love has discovered. She can't find a suitable place to bury the ashes of her late husband, Kurt Cobain, lead singer of Nirvana.Of the two Seattle cemeteries she has approached, one has turned her down, citing security concerns, and the other wants at least $100,000 a year to cover the costs of full-time security to protect the cemetery and grave site. That's in addition to a $75,000 tombstone the cemetery wants her to buy."I don't have that kind of money, and Kurt didn't have that kind of money," said Ms. Love, who sings for the band Hole.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | February 12, 1997
Eric Easton says we media folks have it all wrong. He says there we go again, blowing things out of proportion, inventing a crisis where none exists. He didn't quite suggest that we should all be tarred, feathered and run out of town. But he didn't say he was agin it, either.Easton is one of the guys who demonstrated to have Canaan Discount Food Market closed in November. The issue, Easton and the others have insisted all along, was bad food. But there have been charges that the demonstrators had racial motivations, that their problem with Canaan was not bad food but its Korean owner, Eun Mu Lee.Easton wants all of Baltimore to know that he patronizes Korean merchants frequently, thank you very much, probably more so ** than some of the folks who criticized the Canaan pickets.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1996
An 18-year-old Severn man was convicted of assault and battery in Anne Arundel Circuit Court yesterday for punching a youth last summer while imitating a Bruce Lee karate movie the defendant had just watched with some friends.Joe N. Rider of the 1800 block of Montreal Road pleaded not guilty in the Aug. 16 attack on Anthony Sherer, but was convicted by Judge Raymond G. Thieme Jr. after prosecutors read a statement of facts.Rider is to be sentenced March 1.Assistant State's Attorney Warren W. Davis III said the victim, then 15, was talking to a neighbor in front of his house in the 1700 block of Village Square about 10:15 p.m. when Rider and two acquaintances attacked him.Anthony was hit at least three times in the head, Mr. Davis said.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1996
A Severn man who imitated what he saw in a Bruce Lee karate movie pleaded guilty Friday in Anne Arundel Circuit Court to bashing in the face of a youth last summer.Charles Randolph, 18, of the 1800 block of Quebec Road, who was convicted of assault with intent to maim, will be sentenced Feb. 27 by Judge Raymond G. Thieme Jr.Randolph attacked Anthony Scherer, 15, near his home in the 1700 block of Village Square Court in Severn on Aug. 16. Police say two others also attacked the boy.The youth underwent 10 hours of surgery for a concussion and other head injuries at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center.
FEATURES
By Gene Stout and Gene Stout,Seattle Post-Intelligencer | July 5, 1995
There's no rest for grunge-rock martyrs, as Courtney Love has discovered. She can't find a suitable place to bury the ashes of her late husband, Kurt Cobain, lead singer of Nirvana.Of the two Seattle cemeteries she has approached, one has turned her down, citing security concerns, and the other wants at least $100,000 a year to cover the costs of full-time security to protect the cemetery and grave site. That's in addition to a $75,000 tombstone the cemetery wants her to buy."I don't have that kind of money, and Kurt didn't have that kind of money," said Ms. Love, who sings for the band Hole.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick and Scott Hettrick,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 10, 1993
DRAGON: THE BRUCE LEE STORYMCA/Universal, rated PG-13 1993Tackling a biography of an entertainment personality is loaded with difficult choices, from the approach to casting to deciding on which aspects of the subject's private and professional life to focus.The producers of "Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story" faced the added challenge of dramatizing the life of a legend, whose career has been well-documented in the 20 years since his tragic and sudden death, which remains shrouded in mystery.Unfortunately, the movie gets off to a bad start.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 7, 1993
Now and then the movies conjure up an authentic demon, someone whose energy is so vivid, whose way of moving is so radical, whose attitude is so harsh, that he declares himself essential inNow and then the movies conjure up an authentic demon, someone whose energy is so vivid, whose way of moving is so radical, whose attitude is so harsh, that he declares himself essential in the first few seconds.And so it was with the Chinese-American star Bruce Lee, who blazed ever so briefly and ever so brightly in the early '70s.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | November 19, 1991
''Showdown in Little Tokyo'' is good enough fun when it sticks to karate and related physical activity. Unfortunately, the film goes ugly now and then and when it does, it's really ugly. It includes, for instance, decapitation, amputation and finger-cutting.The last, of course, is a given. This is a film about the Yakuza, the Japanese Mafia, and in all films about this group, there is always a finger-cutting sequence, and it's always a little finger that goes.Apparently, it's a Yakuza tradition.
FEATURES
By Tom Jicha and Tom Jicha,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | January 5, 2005
Alias knows how to capture the audience's attention, at least the male portion of it. The tardy fourth-season premiere opens with Jennifer Garner, as ultra-cool, extremely hot CIA agent Sydney Bristow, cavorting at length in tantalizing white lingerie. Holding a crowd, especially newcomers, might be another matter. ABC has been aggressively promoting the relaunch of Alias with the tagline, "It's not that complicated." They lie. If anything, Alias is more complicated than ever. The return episode is mired in the series' dense mythology and there's a "nothing is as it seems" twist at the very top of the show that will confound the most avid fans.
FEATURES
By Fort Worth Star-Telegram | August 25, 1992
There is a priceless moment in "Rapid Fire," where Brandon Lee is transformed by anger from a scared college kid to a vengeful fighting machine. Co-star Powers Boothe, playing an older and wiser heroic sort, advises Mr. Lee to calm down and get his "fists of fury" under control.The reference may sail right over the heads of the customers who don't keep track of such things. But it's a small treat for the fans: Mr. Boothe's line in "Rapid Fire," which opened at area theaters Friday, is a nod to Lo Wei's "Fists of Fury" (China; 1972)
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | November 19, 1991
''Showdown in Little Tokyo'' is good enough fun when it sticks to karate and related physical activity. Unfortunately, the film goes ugly now and then and when it does, it's really ugly. It includes, for instance, decapitation, amputation and finger-cutting.The last, of course, is a given. This is a film about the Yakuza, the Japanese Mafia, and in all films about this group, there is always a finger-cutting sequence, and it's always a little finger that goes.Apparently, it's a Yakuza tradition.
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