Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBruce Hornsby
IN THE NEWS

Bruce Hornsby

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Choi | April 10, 2008
Three-time Grammy winner Bruce Hornsby has produced an eclectic body of work and collaborated with a wide range of artists, including Don Henley, Stevie Nicks, Tupac Shakur and the Grateful Dead. Country and bluegrass musician Ricky Skaggs has 13 Grammys under his belt and debuted at the top of Billboard's bluegrass albums chart for the fourth time with his most recent album, Honoring the Fathers of Bluegrass: Tribute to 1946 and 1947. The two stars, who have collaborated in the past, team up again for a performance at the Lyric Opera House, 140 W. Mount Royal Ave., at 8 p.m. tomorrow.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Choi | April 10, 2008
Three-time Grammy winner Bruce Hornsby has produced an eclectic body of work and collaborated with a wide range of artists, including Don Henley, Stevie Nicks, Tupac Shakur and the Grateful Dead. Country and bluegrass musician Ricky Skaggs has 13 Grammys under his belt and debuted at the top of Billboard's bluegrass albums chart for the fourth time with his most recent album, Honoring the Fathers of Bluegrass: Tribute to 1946 and 1947. The two stars, who have collaborated in the past, team up again for a performance at the Lyric Opera House, 140 W. Mount Royal Ave., at 8 p.m. tomorrow.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 5, 1991
When you get right down to it, Bruce Hornsby's biggest problem is that he's just a guy who can't say no.He doesn't quite phrase it that way, of course. Ask him about his incredibly busy schedule, and he'll say that all he does are "things that come my way that are enjoyable, just things that I'm asked to do and that I want to do."Which sounds reasonable enough, until he starts rattling off a few of the things he was "asked to do." When not playing with his own band, the Range, he works as a part-time pianist with the Grateful Dead (in fact, he's calling from Kansas City, where he'd played with the Dead only the night before)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 2, 2000
Bruce Hornsby Here Come the Noise Makers (RCA 07863 69308) Thanks to his association with the Grateful Dead - he spent 18 months on the road with the band after the death of keyboardist Brent Mydland - pianist Bruce Hornsby is sometimes lumped in with the jam-band movement. But even though he and his sidemen clearly love to improvise, the heart of Hornsby's live album, "Here Come the Noise Makers," is the songwriting, not the serendipity. That's not to say the band doesn't stretch out, because it does - and brilliantly so. Most of the selections on this double-disc set clock in at seven minutes or longer, and some, such as the 12-minute romp through "Mandolin Rain" and the Dead's "Black Muddy River," are everything improvisational rock should be. But that's just one element of the band's side.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | April 9, 1993
HARBOR LIGHTSBruce Hornsby (RCA 66230)Whenever a pop artist leaves lots of soloing space in a song, it's usually because the melody doesn't have enough strength to stand on its own. So how is it that Bruce Hornsby's "Harbor Lights" boasts first-rate songwriting as well as exciting improvisational sections? Credit some of it to the company he keeps, as Hornsby trades licks with the likes of Branford Marsalis, Pat Metheny and Jerry Garcia (all of whom are expertly spurred on by drummer John Molo and bassist Jimmy Haslip)
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 7, 1995
How did Bruce Hornsby and Branford Marsalis wind up playing the national anthem before Cal Ripken's record-breaking game last night?Simple. They're Angels fans.Hornsby's relationship with the team goes back to a Grateful Dead show in 1991. "You know -- Wally Joyner and Dave Winfield on the stage, stuff like that," he says. So the pianist got into the habit of seeing the team at Camden Yards, the closest major-league stadium to his Williamsburg, Va., home."Every time the Angels come [to Camden Yards]
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 2, 2000
Bruce Hornsby Here Come the Noise Makers (RCA 07863 69308) Thanks to his association with the Grateful Dead - he spent 18 months on the road with the band after the death of keyboardist Brent Mydland - pianist Bruce Hornsby is sometimes lumped in with the jam-band movement. But even though he and his sidemen clearly love to improvise, the heart of Hornsby's live album, "Here Come the Noise Makers," is the songwriting, not the serendipity. That's not to say the band doesn't stretch out, because it does - and brilliantly so. Most of the selections on this double-disc set clock in at seven minutes or longer, and some, such as the 12-minute romp through "Mandolin Rain" and the Dead's "Black Muddy River," are everything improvisational rock should be. But that's just one element of the band's side.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 17, 1994
It may still feel like winter outside, but it's beginning to look like summer on the concert scene.Yesterday, the Merriweather Post Pavilion announced the first concerts in its summer subscription series.Included are shows by such stars as Frank Sinatra, Jimmy Buffett, Bonnie Raitt, Barry Manilow and Steely Dan.Series A includes shows by Mr. Buffett and the Coral Reefer Band with the Iguanas (July 26); Chicago (Aug. 12); Steely Dan (Aug. 23); Ms. Raitt with Bruce Hornsby (July 29); and James Taylor (Aug.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 28, 1995
THE SHOW, THE AFTER-PARTY, THE HOTELJodeci (Uptown/MCA 11258)There's nothing inherently wrong with concept albums; problems arise only when there's no real content to the concept. That seems the case with Jodeci's new album, "The Show, The After-Party, the Hotel." That the group can bring a certain measure of consciousness and class to sex-you-up R&B is clear enough in sweet, slow-grind ballads like "Freek 'n You" and the sexy, sinuous "Get On Up." But let's face it -- even sex gets boring without context or variation, and Jodeci's concept provides little of either.
NEWS
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 14, 1994
SAUGERTIES, New York -- What's it like at Woodstock '94?That depends in large part on where you are. Meander onto the field in front of the North Stage, where Joe Cocker and Crosby, Stills and Nash were playing, and you're instantly awash in a sea of humanity. Movement is limited and slow, as more than 100,000 sweaty, seminaked (and in a few cases, more than seminaked) fans crowd in, each pressing ever closer in the vain hope of getting a slightly better view.Take a walk through the Eco-Village, and it's as if you've wandered into a sort of hippie bazaar.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 7, 1995
How did Bruce Hornsby and Branford Marsalis wind up playing the national anthem before Cal Ripken's record-breaking game last night?Simple. They're Angels fans.Hornsby's relationship with the team goes back to a Grateful Dead show in 1991. "You know -- Wally Joyner and Dave Winfield on the stage, stuff like that," he says. So the pianist got into the habit of seeing the team at Camden Yards, the closest major-league stadium to his Williamsburg, Va., home."Every time the Angels come [to Camden Yards]
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 28, 1995
THE SHOW, THE AFTER-PARTY, THE HOTELJodeci (Uptown/MCA 11258)There's nothing inherently wrong with concept albums; problems arise only when there's no real content to the concept. That seems the case with Jodeci's new album, "The Show, The After-Party, the Hotel." That the group can bring a certain measure of consciousness and class to sex-you-up R&B is clear enough in sweet, slow-grind ballads like "Freek 'n You" and the sexy, sinuous "Get On Up." But let's face it -- even sex gets boring without context or variation, and Jodeci's concept provides little of either.
NEWS
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 14, 1994
SAUGERTIES, New York -- What's it like at Woodstock '94?That depends in large part on where you are. Meander onto the field in front of the North Stage, where Joe Cocker and Crosby, Stills and Nash were playing, and you're instantly awash in a sea of humanity. Movement is limited and slow, as more than 100,000 sweaty, seminaked (and in a few cases, more than seminaked) fans crowd in, each pressing ever closer in the vain hope of getting a slightly better view.Take a walk through the Eco-Village, and it's as if you've wandered into a sort of hippie bazaar.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 17, 1994
It may still feel like winter outside, but it's beginning to look like summer on the concert scene.Yesterday, the Merriweather Post Pavilion announced the first concerts in its summer subscription series.Included are shows by such stars as Frank Sinatra, Jimmy Buffett, Bonnie Raitt, Barry Manilow and Steely Dan.Series A includes shows by Mr. Buffett and the Coral Reefer Band with the Iguanas (July 26); Chicago (Aug. 12); Steely Dan (Aug. 23); Ms. Raitt with Bruce Hornsby (July 29); and James Taylor (Aug.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | April 9, 1993
HARBOR LIGHTSBruce Hornsby (RCA 66230)Whenever a pop artist leaves lots of soloing space in a song, it's usually because the melody doesn't have enough strength to stand on its own. So how is it that Bruce Hornsby's "Harbor Lights" boasts first-rate songwriting as well as exciting improvisational sections? Credit some of it to the company he keeps, as Hornsby trades licks with the likes of Branford Marsalis, Pat Metheny and Jerry Garcia (all of whom are expertly spurred on by drummer John Molo and bassist Jimmy Haslip)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 5, 1991
When you get right down to it, Bruce Hornsby's biggest problem is that he's just a guy who can't say no.He doesn't quite phrase it that way, of course. Ask him about his incredibly busy schedule, and he'll say that all he does are "things that come my way that are enjoyable, just things that I'm asked to do and that I want to do."Which sounds reasonable enough, until he starts rattling off a few of the things he was "asked to do." When not playing with his own band, the Range, he works as a part-time pianist with the Grateful Dead (in fact, he's calling from Kansas City, where he'd played with the Dead only the night before)
FEATURES
November 23, 2007
63 Joe Eszterhas Screenwriter 53 Bruce Hornsby Singer 47 Robin Roberts TV personality 31 Page Kennedy Actor 15 Miley Cyrus Actress
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | October 27, 2005
Hometown -- Baltimore Current members --Kristin Putchinski, vocals, keyboards and guitar Founded in --1995 Style --introspective pop Influenced by --Simon and Garfunkel, Bruce Hornsby, Modest Mouse, Tears for Fears, Prince Notable --About a year ago, Putchinski decided to write, record and produce music full-time from a small recording studio in her house. She works with other singer/songwriters and on her own project, which she oddly named ellen cherry. Quotable --"It was easier than trying to get people to spell my last name," Putchinski said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.