Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBrownsville
IN THE NEWS

Brownsville

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Will Englund and Gary Cohn | December 7, 1997
BROWNSVILLE, Texas -- This dusty, dingy corner of South Texas is a near-perfect place to carry on a dirty job like ship scrapping.Here along the Rio Grande, in a region that has the highest percentage of people living below the poverty line of any American metropolitan area, residents have had to contend in recent years with tick-borne fever, a high concentration of babies born with malformed brains and killer bees. It is one of the few places in the United States where leprosy has not been stamped out.Brownsville, a city of 100,000, is home to garment factories, rail yards, oil-rig repair companies, used-clothing dealers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 20, 2005
JESUS FLORES was born in Villagran, Mexico, in 1951, and he, like so many others, came north - to the choking metal scrapyards of Brownsville, Texas, where he worked as a cutter for 25 years. This spring, he became acquainted with the remains of the Santa Isabel, a 10,200-ton freighter that had been built when he was 16, at the now defunct Sun Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. in Chester, Pa., and that first saw service under the flag of a company called the Grace Lines. For the past 21 years, the Santa Isabel has been the property not of Grace but of the U.S. government, rotting at a mooring on the James River in Virginia; last summer, the Maritime Administration contracted with ESCO Marine, in Brownsville, to break the old vessel into scrap.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Will Englund and Gary Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 1997
This dusty, dingy corner of South Texas is a near-perfect place to carry on a dirty job like ship scrapping.Here along the Rio Grande, in a region that has the highest percentage of people living below the poverty line of any American metropolitan area, residents have had to contend in recent years with tick-borne fever, a high concentration of babies born with malformed brains and killer bees. It is one of the few places in the United States where leprosy has not been stamped out. Brownsville, a city of 100,000, is home to garment factories, rail yards, oil-rig repair companies, used-clothing dealers.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Gary Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 1997
This dusty, dingy corner of South Texas is a near-perfect place to carry on a dirty job like ship scrapping.Here along the Rio Grande, in a region that has the highest percentage of people living below the poverty line of any American metropolitan area, residents have had to contend in recent years with tick-borne fever, a high concentration of babies born with malformed brains and killer bees. It is one of the few places in the United States where leprosy has not been stamped out. Brownsville, a city of 100,000, is home to garment factories, rail yards, oil-rig repair companies, used-clothing dealers.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1996
BROWNSVILLE, Texas -- The surf had been picking up all weekend along the Gulf shore, churned by a ferocious east wind. The sky was clear, and the sun glinted off the foam. Out on South Padre Island, a long condo-filled barrier beach, the surfboard riders were ecstatic. Waves were coming in as high as 10 feet; it was the best surf, they were to say later, in 15 years.As always, Tejano music -- a blend of Mexican polka and Nashville, with a little mariachi and disco thrown in -- blared from radios on the beach.
NEWS
By John M. McClintock and John M. McClintock,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 19, 1992
BROWNSVILLE, Texas -- In less than 36 hours last spring, three children were born without brains at Valley Regional Medical Center here.Two of the babies were stillborn. The third hung on for three days, doomed by a gruesome, fatal defect that leaves infants with an open skull and only the rudiments of a brain.The deaths from the rare defect, known as anencephaly, puzzled Margaret Diaz, an occupational health specialist. She thought the three cases could have been a statistical fluke. Then, she had a chance conversation with a radiologist.
NEWS
By CAMILO JOSE VERGARA | March 7, 1991
By the late 1960s and early '70s, two communities in New York City were the epitome of poverty in the United States: Brownsville in north central Brooklyn, and Mott Haven in the South Bronx.During a bus tour of Brownsville in 1971, Kevin White, former Boston mayor, ominously remarked that the area ''may be the first tangible sign of the collapse of our civilization.''During this period, the city moved large numbers of families displaced by public works projects into New York City Housing Authority projects in Brownsville and Mott Haven.
NEWS
April 20, 2005
JESUS FLORES was born in Villagran, Mexico, in 1951, and he, like so many others, came north - to the choking metal scrapyards of Brownsville, Texas, where he worked as a cutter for 25 years. This spring, he became acquainted with the remains of the Santa Isabel, a 10,200-ton freighter that had been built when he was 16, at the now defunct Sun Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. in Chester, Pa., and that first saw service under the flag of a company called the Grace Lines. For the past 21 years, the Santa Isabel has been the property not of Grace but of the U.S. government, rotting at a mooring on the James River in Virginia; last summer, the Maritime Administration contracted with ESCO Marine, in Brownsville, to break the old vessel into scrap.
NEWS
July 5, 1996
I. D. Robbins,86, a builder who helped realize the American dream of homeownership for thousands of lower-income New Yorkers, died Tuesday. The newspaper columnist-turned-civil-reformer applied the high-volume techniques used by the Levitt family in the suburbs in the 1940s to New York's inner-city neighborhoods. His most famous project was the Nehemiah housing plan. Built in Brooklyn's Brownsville section in 1982, the homes were named for the Old Testament prophet sent by the king of Persia to Jerusalem in 420 B.C. to help rebuild the city after Babylonian captivity.
NEWS
February 10, 1992
Lessons from Brownsville TragedyEditor: Your Jan. 19 edition carried on the front page a story about babies in Brownsville, Texas, born without brains. This is almost surely the tragic result of pollution from industry in Matamoros, Brownsville's sister city in Mexico, where industrial growth has boomed over the last three decades.That growth is dominated by U.S.-owned companies, which moved there to exploit the cheap labor, favorable trade rules and lax enforcement of environmental laws.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Gary Cohn | December 7, 1997
BROWNSVILLE, Texas -- This dusty, dingy corner of South Texas is a near-perfect place to carry on a dirty job like ship scrapping.Here along the Rio Grande, in a region that has the highest percentage of people living below the poverty line of any American metropolitan area, residents have had to contend in recent years with tick-borne fever, a high concentration of babies born with malformed brains and killer bees. It is one of the few places in the United States where leprosy has not been stamped out.Brownsville, a city of 100,000, is home to garment factories, rail yards, oil-rig repair companies, used-clothing dealers.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1996
BROWNSVILLE, Texas -- The surf had been picking up all weekend along the Gulf shore, churned by a ferocious east wind. The sky was clear, and the sun glinted off the foam. Out on South Padre Island, a long condo-filled barrier beach, the surfboard riders were ecstatic. Waves were coming in as high as 10 feet; it was the best surf, they were to say later, in 15 years.As always, Tejano music -- a blend of Mexican polka and Nashville, with a little mariachi and disco thrown in -- blared from radios on the beach.
NEWS
July 5, 1996
I. D. Robbins,86, a builder who helped realize the American dream of homeownership for thousands of lower-income New Yorkers, died Tuesday. The newspaper columnist-turned-civil-reformer applied the high-volume techniques used by the Levitt family in the suburbs in the 1940s to New York's inner-city neighborhoods. His most famous project was the Nehemiah housing plan. Built in Brooklyn's Brownsville section in 1982, the homes were named for the Old Testament prophet sent by the king of Persia to Jerusalem in 420 B.C. to help rebuild the city after Babylonian captivity.
NEWS
February 10, 1992
Lessons from Brownsville TragedyEditor: Your Jan. 19 edition carried on the front page a story about babies in Brownsville, Texas, born without brains. This is almost surely the tragic result of pollution from industry in Matamoros, Brownsville's sister city in Mexico, where industrial growth has boomed over the last three decades.That growth is dominated by U.S.-owned companies, which moved there to exploit the cheap labor, favorable trade rules and lax enforcement of environmental laws.
NEWS
By John M. McClintock and John M. McClintock,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 19, 1992
BROWNSVILLE, Texas -- In less than 36 hours last spring, three children were born without brains at Valley Regional Medical Center here.Two of the babies were stillborn. The third hung on for three days, doomed by a gruesome, fatal defect that leaves infants with an open skull and only the rudiments of a brain.The deaths from the rare defect, known as anencephaly, puzzled Margaret Diaz, an occupational health specialist. She thought the three cases could have been a statistical fluke. Then, she had a chance conversation with a radiologist.
NEWS
By CAMILO JOSE VERGARA | March 7, 1991
By the late 1960s and early '70s, two communities in New York City were the epitome of poverty in the United States: Brownsville in north central Brooklyn, and Mott Haven in the South Bronx.During a bus tour of Brownsville in 1971, Kevin White, former Boston mayor, ominously remarked that the area ''may be the first tangible sign of the collapse of our civilization.''During this period, the city moved large numbers of families displaced by public works projects into New York City Housing Authority projects in Brownsville and Mott Haven.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 19, 2003
SAN ANTONIO -- Clara Flores once thought she had the job of a lifetime, even, perhaps, the most solid job in America. She made blue jeans. Not just any blue jeans. Levi's. "It was the original," Flores said. "Wherever you went, it was the same Levi's blue jeans." The $4.2 billion company, founded 150 years ago by Levi Strauss, a Bavarian immigrant who settled in San Francisco to outfit the gold miners, has turned out more than 3.5 billion pairs of the sturdy denim jeans with their trademark rivets at the seams and little red pocket tab, becoming an American icon right up there with Coca-Cola, Hollywood, the Colt .45 and baseball.
NEWS
February 5, 2004
On January 29, 2004 WILHELMEAN J. WILSON. On Friday friends may call at Earls Chapel United Methodist Church, Brownsville Rd. (Centreville, MD) from 6 to 8 P.M. On Saturday, Mrs. Wilson will lie in state at Charles Wesley United Methodist Church, 423 S. Liberty St., where the family will receive friends from 12 to 1 P.M. with services to follow. Inquiries to (410) 655-0015.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.