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NEWS
May 11, 2010
I was excited to read your May 11 article entitled "Aquarium begins work on Middle Branch Park," which highlighted the planned transformation of a brownfields site along the Middle Branch of the Patapsco River into a community park. Given the magnitude of some of the environmental challenges faced by Baltimore and most cities across our nation, citizens should not simply expect that the public sector will be able to do all of the work. True collaboration will be required, if we are really serious about environmental restoration and the promotion of sustainable practices for the future.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Evans Paull | February 27, 2014
Cities around the world are working to revitalize brownfield sites - areas where redevelopment or reuse may be complicated by some kind of contaminant - particularly in former waterfront industrial zones, where there is often the greatest opportunity to remake the city's image. Just as Baltimore has succeeded in redeveloping industrial sites from Canton to the Inner Harbor to Locust Point, decades of experience across America have created a base of knowledge that is allowing many such projects to move ahead safely, attracting residents and business back to our urban core.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Monday that it is awarding $400,000 to the Baltimore Development Corp. to evaluate potentially contaminated property in the city for cleanup and redevelopment. The BDC, the city's economic development agency, is to receive two grants of $200,000 each after Oct. 1 to assess sites for contamination with hazardous substances or specifically with petroleum products. Shawn M. Garvin, the EPA's Mid-Atlantic regional administrator, said the grant funding is intended to serve as a catalyst for urban revitalization.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2013
So, just how much in public assistance is Harbor Point actually set to receive?  It's a question on a lot of Baltimoreans' minds. As figures fly around in council chambers, news conferences and protests, it's easy to lose track of the total price tag on the package of subsidies proposed for the $1 billion waterfront project.  The short answer: About $400 million. Here's how that breaks down. The current proposal is for the city government to help Michael S. Beatty's Harbor Point Development Group LLC project - which will house Exelon's new regional headquarters - through the following ways: * The city plans to issue $107 million in tax-increment bonds for infrastructure at the site - including seven small parks, a promenade and a bridge.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | March 13, 1995
Washington. -- In his normally delicate fashion, House Speaker Newt Gingrich has stepped into the debate about reclaiming industrial ''brownfields'' by labeling the Environmental Protection Agency ''the biggest job-killing agency in the inner city in America today.''As Mr. Gingrich sees it, the way the environmental agency applies the 15-year-old federal Superfund toxic-waste cleanup law to old industrial properties is ''irrational and economically destructive.'' It demands, he says, that sites be cleaned to standards for a kindergarten playground.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 24, 1997
So-called brownfields legislation designed to help the owners of polluted industrial properties find buyers might benefit some sites in Carroll County.Gov. Parris N. Glendening is expected to sign the bill this week. It will protect the buyers of contaminated sites from lawsuits related to pollution by previous owners and will offer local tax credits and grants for developing contaminated properties.Carroll government officials aren't sure how many local sites might be eligible under the brownfields bill.
NEWS
February 20, 1997
THREE THOUSAND TWO HUNDRED acres along the Port of Baltimore are suddenly more valuable commercial properties. These are "brownfields," vacant buildings or unused land with environmental problems that no one dared occupy. A new law will enable most of this land -- and much more throughout Maryland -- to return to productive economic life.Senate and House emergency bills have swept through their respective houses to give businesses the liability protection they need to restore these acres.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL GISRIEL | February 18, 1996
Dear Mr. Gisriel:Dear Mr. Gisriel:What are "brownfields?" What is the source and extent of the problem? Do "brownfields" exist in Maryland and what proposals are there to solve the problem?Robert HagenBaltimoreDear Mr. Hagen:Dear Mr. Hagen:"Brownfields" describe unused or abandoned urban properties that are either polluted or perceived to be polluted as a result of past commercial or industrial use and are not attractive to the real estate market.What causes a piece of property to sit idle while others attract much coveted commercial or industrial uses?
BUSINESS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2000
Maryland officials and environmentalists have reached agreement on liberalizing the state "brownfields" law so that more old factories and warehouse sites can be redeveloped. Sen. Brian E. Frosh, one of the General Assembly's leading environmental advocates, said yesterday that he would go along with a Glendening administration proposal to provide state funds for landowners to check out possible contamination of their property. In return, the administration agreed to strengthen enforcement of laws requiring cleanup of polluted land, the Montgomery County Democrat said.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1995
Sandwiched between interstate highways and right across from an entrance ramp, the grassy field in East Baltimore seems ideal for a truck terminal or warehouse.But one prospective buyer backed out, and others shopping for highway access won't even look at this Boston Street site, according to its sales agent. The reason: oil leaking from a tank farm fouled the ground water there.Baltimore's once-thriving industrial heart has faltered, leaving shuttered factories, debris-strewn vacant lots and a legacy of pollution that city planners and real estate executives say discourages recycling of the properties.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Monday that it is awarding $400,000 to the Baltimore Development Corp. to evaluate potentially contaminated property in the city for cleanup and redevelopment. The BDC, the city's economic development agency, is to receive two grants of $200,000 each after Oct. 1 to assess sites for contamination with hazardous substances or specifically with petroleum products. Shawn M. Garvin, the EPA's Mid-Atlantic regional administrator, said the grant funding is intended to serve as a catalyst for urban revitalization.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | June 7, 2011
There can be no cuter way to cut your grocery bill than "picking up pawpaws, put 'em in a basket. " Unless, perhaps, you're collecting that wild produce on the banks of a sewage leak. I have a story on urban foraging in The Sun this week. "The City That Breeds," a blog devoted to "the dumber side of Baltimore," linked to it under this inspired headline: " Urban Foraging in Baltimore: or, Hey, this Superfundberry tastes great! " "Look, people, I’m no fascist, hippy-killing, factory-farm loving capitalist, but I’ve seen the quasi-legal things Baltimoreans routinely throw on the ground," the blogger writes.
NEWS
May 11, 2010
I was excited to read your May 11 article entitled "Aquarium begins work on Middle Branch Park," which highlighted the planned transformation of a brownfields site along the Middle Branch of the Patapsco River into a community park. Given the magnitude of some of the environmental challenges faced by Baltimore and most cities across our nation, citizens should not simply expect that the public sector will be able to do all of the work. True collaboration will be required, if we are really serious about environmental restoration and the promotion of sustainable practices for the future.
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2004
With a 137-0 House vote, the General Assembly gave final approval yesterday to Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s brownfields redevelopment reform bill. Only the governor's signature is needed to enact changes to Maryland's voluntary cleanup program for polluted industrial sites. "We're very pleased with that today," Ehrlich said. The administration bill that sailed through the House yesterday with only minor changes streamlines the application and waiting process for developers who join the state program.
BUSINESS
By Michael English and Michael English,Special to SunSpot | January 26, 2004
There's no more land in Charm City. City fathers say it's all gone: Every significant tract zoned for industrial and commercial use within city limits is either home to an active business, or was once used and now stands abandoned, unwanted or unusable. That leaves developers keen on building in the city with few choices -- wait for a property vacancy in-town, look for real estate elsewhere, or opt for what's becoming a popular choice: building on a cleaned-up brownfield site. Brownfield revitalization now is an essential element in the city's efforts to market Baltimore to companies that want to relocate here, but can't find vacant property on which to build.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2003
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. moved forward yesterday on his campaign promise to encourage cleanup and redevelopment of polluted industrial sites by unveiling changes to simplify the process for developers who want to join the state program. The governor also pledged the administration will try to push a more controversial measure through the General Assembly this winter that would limit developers' liability for the polluted sites known as brownfields. "What we have been doing in this state for the past decade has not worked as well as it should work," Ehrlich said during a news conference at the Maryland Department of the Environment headquarters in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2003
The first Baltimore class in a new job training program graduates today -- eight novice environmentalists who now can tell you the meaning of "phytoremediation" in a heartbeat. (For the record: It means the use of plants to clean up contaminated soil or groundwater.) The free, eight-week pilot program taught at Civic Works, a nonprofit organization based in Clifton Park, used field trips, classroom studies and practical demonstrations to train the students in techniques for reclaiming idle, contaminated industrial sites known as brownfields.
NEWS
August 28, 2001
A FORMER Exxon tank farm off Boston street in industrial Canton is hopelessly contaminated with spilled oil and gasoline. Yet city economic development officials are itching to get their hands on that 80-acre brownfield. To them, it's a land of opportunity, a sizable parcel next to deep-water shipping piers and I-95 that could be redeveloped as a site for new companies and jobs. In an old smokestack city like Baltimore, finding new uses for contaminated land is a key to future prosperity.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2003
The first Baltimore class in a new job training program graduates today -- eight novice environmentalists who now can tell you the meaning of "phytoremediation" in a heartbeat. (For the record: It means the use of plants to clean up contaminated soil or groundwater.) The free, eight-week pilot program taught at Civic Works, a nonprofit organization based in Clifton Park, used field trips, classroom studies and practical demonstrations to train the students in techniques for reclaiming idle, contaminated industrial sites known as brownfields.
NEWS
By Winnie Hu and Winnie Hu,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 27, 2003
TROY, N.Y. -- This rough-hewn city along the Hudson just north of Albany claims to be where the Industrial Revolution began in America, and it even salvaged the remains of an old ironworks foundry by turning it into a museum. But its industrial heritage also left a different legacy: polluted land along the waterfront. These abandoned industrial sites, known as brownfields, have long been contaminated with chemicals, fuel and other pollutants that seeped deep into the ground. Until the brownfields are cleaned up, they cannot be used for other purposes, frustrating the city's plans for a $100 million effort to redevelop the waterfront.
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