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By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2000
All-Metro boys Soccer Player of the Year Adom Crew will attend Brown University in Providence, R.I. The River Hill All-American, a three-time first-team All-Metro selection and a four-year starter who led his team to three straight state championships and a 67-7 record, had narrowed his choices to Brown and Yale. "The academics are great at either place, but Brown has a great social atmosphere plus a good soccer program," Crew said. He has a 4.0 grade-point average and a 1,300 SAT score.
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By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
Rita Sloan Berndt, a neurology professor at the University of Maryland Medical School for 25 years who studied people who suffered from aphasia, the loss of the power to use or understand words, died June 17 of lymphoma at her home in Roland Park. She was 70. Sheila Blumstein, a professor of cognitive linguistics and psychological sciences at Brown University, called her colleague and friend a force in the fields of aphasia and neuroscience. "We have yet to truly understand aphasia and the reasons behind it, but we've come a long way, and Rita was part of the reason we've come a long way," Dr. Blumstein said.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 10, 1999
Scientists at Brown University said yesterday that they had found tantalizing evidence that the northern lowlands of Mars once bore a wide ocean that, until it dried up, had waves, hidden depths and long beaches.The findings, reported in today's issue of the journal Science, were hailed for making the best case yet for the existence of a sea on primordial Mars. Although the findings bore no direct evidence of alien life on the planet, the large amounts of water would indicate that life might once have thrived.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Afaa Michael Weaver, a Baltimore native who spent 15 years as a factory worker, has won one the country's most lucrative poetry prizes. Weaver, a professor at Simmons College in Boston, received the $100,000 Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award for his most recent poetry collection, "The Government of Nature. " "My license to be a poet is one I inherited from black and poor people who built cultures out of a faith in stuggle and hope," Weaver writes on his website .  Weaver, 62, was born in East Baltimore to parents with little formal education.
NEWS
January 24, 2001
The student: Anna Bergren, 17. School: Hammond High School. Special achievement: Anna was recognized as a National Merit semifinalist. Favorite subject: Math. Educational future: She plans to major in neuroscience in college. Brown University is her No. 1 choice. How she describes herself: Compassionate, creative, dedicated. Hobbies: Dancing, playing the flute, participation in her church. How it feels to be recognized: "It's nice to have that type of recognition that both students and adults understand."
NEWS
September 3, 2006
Against Depression By Peter D. Kramer Depression, linked in our culture to a long tradition of "heroic melancholy," is often understood as ennobling -- a source of soulfulness and creativity. Tracing this belief from Aristotle to the Romantics to Picasso, and to present-day memoirs of mood disorder, Peter Kramer, a clinical professor of psychiatry at Brown University and the author of the best-selling Listening to Prozac, suggests that the pervasiveness of the illness has distorted our sense of what it is to be human.
FEATURES
May 10, 1992
Of the six fat envelopes that arrived at Angie Littwin's door in April, she was most interested in the Brown one.As in Brown University, the Ivy League campus high atop a College Hill in Providence, R.I. Brown was Angie's first choice among the the nine colleges she applied to (and wrote about in her April 12 essay in the Sun Magazine). She also was accepted at Northwestern, Oberlin, the University of Pennsylvania, Wesleyan and Grinnell.Angie had Brown at the top of her list ever since her father, Sun sports columnist Mike Littwin, once told her he wished he had gone there.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Afaa Michael Weaver, a Baltimore native who spent 15 years as a factory worker, has won one the country's most lucrative poetry prizes. Weaver, a professor at Simmons College in Boston, received the $100,000 Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award for his most recent poetry collection, "The Government of Nature. " "My license to be a poet is one I inherited from black and poor people who built cultures out of a faith in stuggle and hope," Weaver writes on his website .  Weaver, 62, was born in East Baltimore to parents with little formal education.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2010
After a yearlong, mostly volunteer restoration effort, Back River in eastern Baltimore County is rid of more than 170 tons of debris, 2,000 tires and just last week, eight huge conduit pipes from a construction site. The river, long considered one of Maryland's most degraded waterways, is showing signs of life. Volunteers are finding crayfish, turtles and even a few crabs. "People are actually stopping and seeing how much work we have done," said Brian Schilpp, a county teacher who coordinates the cleanup.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 22, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The cause of women in sports -- a campaign waged often in courtrooms as well as on playing fields and in gyms -- emerged a major victor in the Supreme Court yesterday.Without dissent, the court voted to leave intact two wide-ranging appeals court rulings aimed at bringing about parity in varsity sports for college men and women. Those decisions came in a celebrated dispute involving Brown University.Under those rulings, a college that is not doing enough on its own to field women's teams is required by a federal law -- Title IX -- to create enough sports options for women to bring them up to a level equal to their share of the entire student body.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
Dr. Peter C. Maloney, an internationally known biochemist who was a professor of physiology and associate dean for graduate students at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died Dec. 12 of cancer at his Bare Hills home. He was 72. "Peter was such a wonderful person who did everything with grace and fairness. He was beloved by everyone," said Dr. William B. Guggino, professor of physiology and vice chair for research in pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
Dr. Doris R. Entwisle, a professor of sociology and engineering studies at the Johns Hopkins University for nearly half a century and a pioneer in the field of the sociology of education, died Tuesday of cancer at her Towson home. She was 89. "Doris exemplified dignity and was extremely personal. She was a very warm person but did not wear that on her sleeve," said Dr. Karl L. Alexander, who collaborated with Dr. Entwisle on the Beginning School Study, which examined the personal and educational development of about 800 city first-graders over 25 years.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
Former Johns Hopkins All-American Kyle Harrison is helping to bring together the world's greatest black lacrosse players to form the Sankofa Lacrosse Alliance, aimed at promoting academic, professional and social achievement for the next generation of lacrosse players. “We have all been in the situation where we were the only black player on a team,” said Harrison, a Friends graduate who won the 2005 Tewaaraton Award as the nation's top player. “It's about celebrating how far the sport has come, and to show young black players that there are other players that look just like them playing this sport at a very high level.” On Oct. 25, the Ambassadors team - made up of African-American professional and recent college players - will scrimmage against Brown University and Team England in Providence, R.I. “We've each been approached about the idea of starting an all-black team numerous times,” said co-organizer Chazz Woodson, a midfielder for Major League Lacrosse's Ohio Machine.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2013
Dr. Alan Ross, a longtime faculty member of the Johns Hopkins University whose love of numbers fed his career and also an enjoyment of baseball, died Sept. 7 at Roland Park Place. He was 87. He was born in Oxford, Ohio, to E.C and Madeliene Ross, and raised in both Oxford and Hamilton, Ohio, where his extended family lived. His father was an English professor at Miami University. Family members say as a youngster, Dr. Ross showed a predilection for learning, winning several state mathematics awards in school.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
A chant resembling a rally at a college stadium rang from a first-grade classroom at the Baltimore charter school KIPP Harmony Academy. "M-A-R-Y-L-A-N-D," the children sang, pumping their fists. "Maryland will win!" This week's activity helped introduce the 5- and 6-year-olds to a new school year at KIPP, where conversations about "climbing the mountain to college" begin in kindergarten and classrooms take on the identity of colleges and universities that children can aspire to attend.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2013
Herman L. Ammon, who taught chemistry at the University of Maryland, College Park for nearly five decades and was also an expert in the field of crystal structure, died Aug. 2 of a stroke at Doctors Community Hospital in Lanham. He was 76. "Herm was a professor of chemistry at the University of Maryland, who taught thousands of Maryland students during his 45 years on the faculty, many of whom have gone on to distinguished careers in medicine, government and industrial organizations," said Janice E. Reutt-Robey, chairman of the department of chemistry and biochemistry at Maryland.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | March 19, 1991
Providence, Rhode Island. In the end, expelling Douglas Hann may have been the easy part. It's proving much harder to exorcise him. The ghost of this Big, Bad Man on Campus still casts a malevolent aura over the Ivy League quadrangles of Brown University.On Wednesday, Mr. Hann was the context and subtext for a Public Affairs Conference here on what has come to be called ''hate speech'' on campus. Does a student have a right to cast a racial epithet or a sexual slur, to wave a Confederate flag or wear a swastika?
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
Former Johns Hopkins All-American Kyle Harrison is helping to bring together the world's greatest black lacrosse players to form the Sankofa Lacrosse Alliance, aimed at promoting academic, professional and social achievement for the next generation of lacrosse players. “We have all been in the situation where we were the only black player on a team,” said Harrison, a Friends graduate who won the 2005 Tewaaraton Award as the nation's top player. “It's about celebrating how far the sport has come, and to show young black players that there are other players that look just like them playing this sport at a very high level.” On Oct. 25, the Ambassadors team - made up of African-American professional and recent college players - will scrimmage against Brown University and Team England in Providence, R.I. “We've each been approached about the idea of starting an all-black team numerous times,” said co-organizer Chazz Woodson, a midfielder for Major League Lacrosse's Ohio Machine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
With courage and determination and more than a little bit of moxie, Adelle Waldman set out to crack the code. For her debut novel, a modern-day comedy of manners called "The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P," the Baltimore-raised author decided to explore - and expose - the thinking of the kind of guy that she and her friends used to date. Nate is a rising star on the New York literary scene, fueled by insecurity and arrogance. He's a serial dater who justifies dumping his girlfriend a few days after she'd had an abortion by reassuring himself "that he was not the kind of guy who disappeared after sleeping with a woman - and certainly not after the condom broke.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2013
Jean-Pierre G. Meyer, former professor and chairman of the Johns Hopkins University mathematics department whose escape from Nazi-occupied France became the subject of a children's book, died April 24 of heart failure at his Guilford residence. He was 83. "He was conscientious and really very smart and kind, and that's not always a combination that goes together," said W. Stephen Wilson, a close friend and math department colleague. "He was department chairman for five years and no one has been chairman for five years since the 1980s to today," said Dr. Wilson.
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