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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 28, 1991
BLOOMINGTON -- The brown trout that DNR biologist Mike Dean has been rearing in net pens below Bloomington Dam never have been an official part of the Maryland stocking plan, but this fall, if all goes according to plan, some 15,000 of the browns will be released in Western Maryland.If they are released, they will represent a triumph for Dean and will be a feather in the cap of the DNR Freshwater Fisheries program, because rearing brown trout is not so easy as culturing rainbow trout.The major drawback, said Ken Pavol, regional fisheries director for Garrett and Allegany counties, is that browns take longer to raise than rainbows, which traditionally have been the base for Maryland's stocking program.
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By Nate Rabner, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
Jeff Lewatowski trudged upstream, the chilly, knee-deep Gunpowder River flowing around his waterproof overalls. Following the inside curve of a bend, he picked a likely looking spot and settled in, much like the trout he planned to catch. "They want to take advantage of the bugs," said Lewatowski, 39, who lives in Havre de Grace and guides fishing trips around the state. "They get very excitable the more bugs there are on the water. … They compete in a spot in the creek to sit. " May through June is sulphur mayfly season, with thousands of mayfly nymphs swimming up from sunken logs and rocks to molt and flutter away for their brief adult lives.
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SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | July 10, 1994
The road that winds back through Mineral County, W.Va., past the hamlet of Barnum is at its best in dry weather, and even then the dirt surface is rutted and potholed. But at the end of the rough ride lies the best trout fishing in the North Branch of the Potomac River.Tommy Morgan and his friend since boyhood, Troy Lynn, have made the trip many times over the past 10 years, whenever they felt the need to get away to Blue Hole.On June 28, Morgan and Lynn made their way down to the North Branch, flies and rods in hand, after a day of fixing up a house Lynn had bought nearby.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2011
Something positive resulted from last month's battle with Mother Nature: more places to catch trout this fall. More than 27,000 trout will be stocked throughout the state starting this month. Most of the trout will be either rainbow or golden trout weighing an average of one pound each. There will also be about 1,500 brown trout weighing about a pound each, as well as 300 rainbow and golden trout weighing two to three pounds each. Approximately 1,000 additional trout will be donated by The Freshwater Institute in West Virginia, a research facility.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1997
Maryland's stocking program will supply some 400,000 rainbow and brown trout for recreational anglers in many areas of the state this spring through a schedule of releases that continues into May.State hatcheries, which were placed behind schedule by flooding in January and September of last year, were pressed to produce the annual complement of trout.However, according to DNR, additional hatchery personnel was hired and feeding rates were increased to produce the stocks."Anglers should be pleased with the overall size of these fish," said Bob Lunsford, director of the Restoration and Enhancement Division of the state's Fisheries Service.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1997
The Savage River tailrace in Garrett County has been one of the most scenic trout-fishing areas in the state for several years, and DNR young-of-the-year surveys indicate continuing healthy populations of brook and brown trout.The recent survey showed excellent reproduction for brook and brown trout, with 1,271 young-of-the-year brookies and 1,295 young-of-the-year browns per mile.Among adult populations, the majority were brown trout (431 adults per mile and 45.4 pounds per acre), while only 70 adult brook trout per mile (4 pounds per acre)
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1998
The two-day extension of the firearms hunting season for antlerless white-tailed and sika deer opens tomorrow and ends Saturday in 18 counties of the state where deer populations have been increasing rapidly in recent years.Michael Slattery, director of the Department of Natural Resources' Wildlife Division, said that the extension in all counties east of Carroll is necessary because deer continue to thrive in agricultural areas and on the fringes of outer suburban areas.Reports of crops and property damage and vehicle collisions with deer continue to increase in most areas of the state.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1995
During the past several years, the number of junior hunters in the state has decreased steadily, and this year, in an attempt to offset the trend, the Department of Natural Resources has designated Saturday as a statewide, one-day deer hunt for qualified junior hunters."
NEWS
August 18, 1995
State kills 3,500 trout after disease spreadsOAKLAND -- State fisheries employees killed 3,500 sick brown trout this week after a disease spread through Maryland's newest fish-rearing facility.The fish were 1-year-old adults being raised in the drainage pond of the state's largest coal mining operation run by Mettiki Coal Corp. in extreme southwestern Garrett County.The fish suffered from a disease called furunculosis, that causes sores on their bodies.It's unclear exactly what caused the fish to contract furunculosis, a disease triggered by bacteria that commonly trouble hatcheries that raise brown trout, said Steve Early, associate director of freshwater fisheries for the Department of Natural Resources.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | February 22, 1994
Over the next 10 weeks or so, DNR's Freshwater Fisheries Division will stock nearly 330,000 trout in rivers, lakes, streams and ponds across the state. And while most of the stocking will be with rainbow trout from 10 to 17 inches in length, 45,000 brown trout will be placed in areas where longer-term survival is expected.Most put-and-take areas will have a five-fish creel limit and will require a freshwater fishing license and a trout stamp.New areas to be stocked include Big Elk Creek in Cecil County, Shad Landing Pond in Worcester County, the North Branch of the Potomac from Jennings Randolph Lake upstream to the lower boundary of Potomac State Forest and the Youghiogheny River from Interstate 68 downstream to Youghiogheny Reservoir Garrett County.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 26, 2011
"There is no guarantee that when a middle-aged man enters the dark forest where the black dog is waiting, he will come out healed. It is possible to be broken there beyond hope of repair. " -- Howell Raines, from "Fly Fishing Through The Midlife Crisis" Mike Flanagan and I became friends after his major league pitching career ended and most of his old teammates and fishing buddies from the glory years of the Baltimore Orioles had scattered across the country. We were transplanted New Englanders, rooted in Maryland and approaching middle age with fly rods in our hands -- mine in my right, Mike's in his left.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | March 23, 2007
ACCIDENT -- Mark Harmon remembers the first hint of something funny with the trout at the state's Bear Creek hatchery in Western Maryland. The fish were swimming in circles. "You ever see a puppy chasing its tail? That's what they looked like," said Harmon, the hatchery's assistant manager. As it turns out, the fishes' spines and skulls were being deformed by a deadly parasite called Myxobolus cerebralis. The microscopic species causes an infection known as "whirling disease" that has decimated trout populations in Colorado, Montana and other Western states.
NEWS
February 11, 2003
Building ICC won't cut traffic, reduce pollution Thank you for emphasizing federal authorities' rejection of the proposed Intercounty Connector (ICC) and the damage it would do to air, water and wildlife in Montgomery and Prince George's counties ("Disputed connector road finds momentum," Jan. 28). We also appreciate the clarification The Sun ran the next day regarding the views of a state biologist on the harm that the ICC would cause to brown trout in the Paint Branch stream. Readers should not be misled, however, by unnamed "state officials" asserting that the highway will ease traffic snarls on the Capital Beltway and "reduce air pollution by getting traffic moving again."
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2003
CLARIFICATION An article yesterday on the proposed Intercounty Connector in Montgomery County gave an incomplete account of the views of state biologist Charles R. Gougeon. Gougeon says that while some Maryland trout fisheries have survived highway construction, he believes building the ICC would likely reduce the brown trout population in the Paint Branch stream. ROCKVILLE - The Ehrlich administration is pushing ahead with plans to build an 18-mile highway through the forests and across the streams of Montgomery County - a road that has been embraced by politicians and commuters but was twice rejected by the Environmental Protection Agency.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2002
Sunshine dappled the banks of the Gunpowder Falls yesterday, and the first golden leaves of autumn dropped into the rushing water as Lloyd Lachow ditched work to step into the water and match wits with brown trout. "This is unbelievable," said Lachow, 50, of Reisterstown, as he worked happily to untangle his line and tie on a fly. "It is as beautiful as any place in the world. ... It would be incredibly awful if the trout were to expire." As untroubled as the Gunpowder Valley looked yesterday, anglers, tackle shop owners and natural resources officials say the trout had a narrow escape from this summer's drought.
FEATURES
By Dan Rodricks and Dan Rodricks,SUN COLUMNIST | October 17, 2001
It might be some of the best money ever spent by the state of Maryland - $16,200 for Carrie Dixon's two old house-trailers, her trampoline-size satellite dish and one acre of bottomland on a section of the Potomac River that had been poisoned for a century, left for dead and forgotten. Now the Dixon place, across some railroad tracks in an eye-blink of Allegany County called Black Oak, is about to become one of the few public access points to the North Branch - a place where people with kayaks and fishing rods might start to visit a long, tree-lined stretch of "the nation's river" that few Marylanders have ever seen.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | March 22, 1998
Think fishing in Central and Eastern Maryland, and Chesapeake Bay rockfish or river and impoundment bass probably come to mind first. But the state also has a burgeoning freshwater trout fishery that is attracting thousands of anglers of all ages."
SPORTS
September 10, 1992
NAMES AND PLACES* An 800-acre area of Patapsco Valley State Park in Carroll County will be opened to bow hunters for white-tail deer from Nov. 2-Jan. 30. Hunting will be by permit only. Permits for the period from Nov. 2-Dec. 12 will be issued by a lottery drawing on Oct. 10 at 10 a.m. at park headquarters. For more information, call (410) 461-5005.* When Howard Collins took a 40-pound, 4-ounce brown trout from the Little Red River in Arkansas on May 9, he settled a 125-year-old dispute -- he set the world all-tackle record for brown trout, according to the National Fresh Water Fishing Hall of Fame.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | October 8, 2000
Tuesday was a simply stunning day for folks and fish on the Gunpowder River just south of the Bluemount Road bridge. For the humans, it was morning dew, a blue sky and warm sunshine. For the brown trout, it was a jolt of electricity. It sure pays to be human. The shock was part of the state's annual assessment of the number and quality of the fish in one of the East Coast's best trout waters. Unlike the human census taken every decade by Uncle Sam, Charlie Gougeon, a fisheries biologist, gets 100 percent participation from the Gunpowder browns.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2000
Carroll County's wastewater treatment plant in Hampstead has not harmed fish living in a feeder stream to Piney Run, state officials have concluded. The plant discharges treated water into the stream, which originates in Hampstead. Baltimore County residents sparked a border feud two years ago when they filed a lawsuit against Carroll County, alleging the effluent overheated the water and killed the fish in violation of the federal Clean Water Act. Piney Run "supports wild brown trout and an assemblage of stream fish that are generally representative of trout streams in Maryland," Charles R. Gougeon, regional fisheries manager, wrote in a four-page report on the stream.
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