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By Julie Rothman and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2010
Saundra Byrd from Brooklyn, Md., was looking for a recipe for peanut-butter fudge. She said the fudge was served in Baltimore County school cafeterias in the 1960s and '70s. Barbara Whitman of Glyndon sent in a recipe for peanut-butter fudge that she obtained when she was a teacher at Franklin Junior High School in the early 1970s. I'm fairly confident that fudge as luscious and rich as this, even with peanut butter as a main ingredient, would not be found in a school cafeteria these days.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple and By Evan Siple | April 15, 2014
Coming up on its fourth anniversary, Bluegrass Tavern has quietly been earning top marks as a carefully crafted American cuisine establishment in an area that has seen a wave of revitalization, much to the restaurant's benefit. And with a relatively wide selection of whiskeys and bourbons at the bar's disposal, it should be no surprise that the cocktail program is equally carefully crafted and heavy on the brown stuff. Bartender Jenna Kumm has put together a complex set of libations to fill the list, one in particular serving as a next-level whiskey sour: the Wake and Bake.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | January 14, 2014
Pallottola (noun): Italian for "bullet"; a defense for the capricious weather conditions of this January in Baltimore; a drink featured on the brand new cocktail menu at Verde, the Neopolitan pizza restaurant in Canton. Designed by bar manager Alec Franklin to ward off the winter blues, the Pallottola is a fun-to-say seasonal sipper created with a healthy dose of rye and Fernet Branca. In other words, this is a strong drink - with a mission. Franklin also wanted to showcase the small, family-owned restaurant's commitment to both local sourcing as well as its traditional Italian roots.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | January 14, 2014
Pallottola (noun): Italian for "bullet"; a defense for the capricious weather conditions of this January in Baltimore; a drink featured on the brand new cocktail menu at Verde, the Neopolitan pizza restaurant in Canton. Designed by bar manager Alec Franklin to ward off the winter blues, the Pallottola is a fun-to-say seasonal sipper created with a healthy dose of rye and Fernet Branca. In other words, this is a strong drink - with a mission. Franklin also wanted to showcase the small, family-owned restaurant's commitment to both local sourcing as well as its traditional Italian roots.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2010
Anita Charles of Greensboro, N.C., was looking for a marinade recipe for flank steak that contained orange juice, garlic and possibly soy sauce. Donald Van Ostrand from Sykesville sent in a recipe that he first used on tuna but that he says works equally well for grilled flank steak, pork tenderloin or chicken. Now that grilling season has arrived, this seemed like a recipe worth trying. I tested his marinade on a 2-pound piece of flank steak, since that was what Anita Charles was looking for, and it gave the meat a wonderful flavor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2010
Anne Loy from Knoxville, Tenn., was looking for a recipe for making a baked tomato dish that used brown sugar to make it somewhat sweet. Now that the summer crop of tomatoes is here in all its glory, this seemed like an ideal time to explore some recipes for this classic Southern-style side dish. Phyllis Taylor from Middle River sent in four different versions of sweet baked tomatoes, which she said came from a cookbook her family self-published several years ago for a family reunion.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2001
Mildred Kriwko of Lake Zurich, Ill., wrote that she has had no success in finding a recipe for pork chops using brown sugar and Coca-Cola. Her response came from Nedra Shelly of Silver Spring, who noted: "This recipe comes from the Aunt Bee's Mayberry Cookbook. I have made it many times. It's easy and it's always a big hit. I also like to include onion rings. You can also make this in a crockpot." Recipe requests Albert W. Norman of Gore Springs, Miss., is seeking a cornmeal-dumpling recipe.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2012
Janet Whitman of Randallstown was looking for a recipe for breakfast rice that she lost. She said the recipe came from a booklet put out by the manufacturer of Minute Rice in the 1960s. She said her children enjoyed it when they were young, and she would like to be able to make it again. Marie Grove from Manchester sent in a recipe that she said came from a booklet called "Timeless Recipes with Minute Rice," published by General Foods in 1965. With all the choices these days for quick or instant breakfast we don't often think of rice as an option, particularly in this country, but as this older recipe illustrates, rice can be a wholesome and healthful choice.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2011
Nancy Hannah from Baltimore was looking for a recipe for a quick and simple single-layer cake with a caramel icing. She thought the cake might have been called Caramel Frosted Picnic cake and was made with the one-bowl method. She said the cake was ideal for taking to picnics because it held up well and was easy to transport. Gladys Wilt from Lothian sent in a recipe from her copy of "The Joy of Cooking," 1953 edition, for Hurry-Up Caramel Cake that she thought might be close to what Hannah was looking for. The name of this cake speaks for itself.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | January 31, 1999
Spices were the most precious commodity of the ancient world, treasured during the millenniums before refrigeration and modern food-preservation techniques for their therapeutic and culinary value. Fundamental to everything from ketchup to wedding cake, spices are still the most widely used seasoning after salt. Harvested in a variety of forms -- as flower buds (clove), berries (allspice), seed kernels (nutmeg) or bark (cinnamon) -- dried whole spices can up be kept up to two years if stored away from kitchen heat, light and moisture.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
Roseanne Glick from Mount Washington was looking for the recipe for a delicious appetizer that someone brought to a potluck cocktail party recently. She said it was a water chestnut wrapped in bacon and coated with some type of a barbecue sauce. She, along with many other guests at the party, found the single-bite morsels surprisingly irresistible. Jan Warren from Havre de Grace had the very recipe Glick had described for barbecue water chestnuts. She said for fun, she sometimes calls them "pig nuts" in honor of the bacon and water chestnuts.
HEALTH
By Elaine Pelc, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical System regularly contribute a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. The latest post is from Elaine Pelc. Browsing the baking aisle for sugar is no longer an easy venture. The sugar we are all used to is now surrounded by alternatives on the shelves. Figuring out what these products really are and how to use them can often be an overwhelming task.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
Linda Settles from Havre de Grace was looking for a recipe for brown sugar pie that duplicated the one her grandmother used to make. She said her grandmother had five daughters but none of them remember how she made the pie. Jeannie Armstrong from Dayton, MD found a recipe for the pie in a cookbook she bought at an antique store years ago. It was first published in 1915 and revised in 1944. I tested the recipe that she kindly sent in and found that it needed a little tweaking.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2012
Matt Miller from Cockeysville was looking for a recipe for making a lamb stew in a white gravy similar to the one his grandfather used to make. Audrey O'Bryan from Easthampton, Mass., sent in a recipe for a lamb stew that, though it does not have a white gravy, she thought Miller would enjoy. It comes from the February/March issue of Eating Well magazine. She said this stew is very easy to make as nothing requires browning, and she particularly likes that she can throw it all together in the morning before heading to work and come home in the evening to a hearty supper that everyone in her family, even her 7-year-old, gobbles up. I found that this particular recipe makes a rather soup-like stew.
EXPLORE
November 15, 2012
Victoria Gastro Pub Executive Chef Joe Krywucki reflects: Seasonal cooking is always best, especially when you have access to high quality ingredients. We use an all-natural Duroc pork, which has a superior flavor and tenderness, and local Baugher's Farm Honey Crisp apples. Pork Tenderloin 1.    Season the pork tenderloin with salt and pepper. 2.    Pan sear the pork in clarified butter until golden brown. 3.    Roast in oven at 350 degrees F until desired temperature.
NEWS
By Mindy Athas, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth). This week, Mindy Athas weighs in on sugar. The term sugar is used for a variety of caloric sweeteners from multiple plant sources, including sugar beet, sugar cane, corn, agave, rice, nuts, fruit, vegetables, tree sap and grains. It is also found in all milks. Sugar is readily used in a multitude of foods, drinks, condiments and even medications.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | September 28, 2011
Fall - finally! I, for one, am in desperate need of a crisp, warm, comforting cocktail to ring in the cooler weather. Think spicy, rich flavors, lush, dark cognacs, seasonal apple and pumpkin accents, a touch of mystery. If you're craving a good autumn drink as much as I am, step into the strange and whimsically macabre world of Annabel Lee Tavern in Highlandtown. Proprietor Kurt Bragunier has been serving up delicious, dark drinks at his Edgar Allan Poe-themed restaurant for four years and admits his favorite drink, back on menu this season after a two-year hiatus, is a bit of an enigma to patrons.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2004
Claudette Chambers of Baltimore requested recipes for real baked-in-the-oven baked beans. Louise Wagner of Sebastopol, Calif., responded with tester Laura Reiley's choice. Wagner wrote: "I found this in a Better Homes and Garden Best Budget Recipes magazine from 1973. Enjoy. We do." Boston Baked Beans Makes 8 servings 16 ounces (2 cups) dry navy beans 2 quarts cold water 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup molasses 1/3 cup packed brown sugar 1 teaspoon dry mustard 4 ounces salt pork 1 medium onion, chopped Rinse beans; add to water in saucepan.
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