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By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | February 7, 2007
Side dishes can make or break a diet. So when it comes to making smart choices, a veteran restaurant critic I know offers this rule of thumb: Never eat a starch unless it is "out of the ordinary." That effectively eliminates most mashed potatoes, french fries, pastas and white rice - largely empty carbohydrates with low nutritional value and just average flavor. What's left? Brown rice, whose chewy texture can break up mealtime monotony and boost nutrition. The government recently advised Americans to eat three servings daily of whole grains, which have been linked to a lower risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick | January 9, 2012
Baltimore County Restaurant Week starts on Thursday, with some 40 restaurants participating in what amounts to a free-for-all.  Restaurants can fix the price for their promotional menus, for lunch or dinner, at $10, $15, $20, $25, $30 or $35 for one, two or three courses.  Basically, everyone can do whatever the hell they want to. That's fine I suppose -- there are some good deals out there.  But jeez, Baltimore County people sure hate...
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NEWS
By Renee Enna and Renee Enna,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 10, 2005
I love the flavor of grilled food, but on weeknights I don't have the time or energy to heat up my charcoal grill. That's where the broiler comes in. For this dish, while chicken breasts are broiling, you're putting together a salsa of readily available ingredients - starting with canned pineapple chunks and black beans. Brown rice provides a nice foundation for both. Beverage pairing A Mexican beer will complement the entree. For a nonalcoholic libation, pour equal parts cranberry juice and tonic water over ice with slices of lime.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2011
Judith Fieldhouse from Hampstead was looking for a recipe for making cinnamon rice. She said it was served in a local restaurant as an accompaniment to duck — "the duck was very good, but the rice was fantastic" — and she has never been able to figure out how to make it. Karen Brannick of Bel Air sent in a recipe she had from a cooking club class at the Maryland Golf & Country Clubs that she thought might be close. This tasty side dish would be a simple addition to any meal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 20, 2005
What is it about vegetarian restaurants and ponytails? Nearly every patron (and most of the servers) at One World Cafe on a recent weekday seemed to sport a ponytail. Some were shiny and bouncy, others gray and thin, springing from nearly bald heads, but ponytails were definitely the accessory du jour. Ponytails seem to represent a certain kind of still-in-the-'60s college sensibility, and One World Cafe is a certain kind of still-in-the-'60s vegetarian restaurant. Every college town seems to have one, and Baltimore is lucky to have one as fine and friendly as One World Cafe, across the street from the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
March 28, 1999
Whole grains such as brown rice are best stored in airtight containers in a cool, dark, dry place and used within three months.-- Cole's Cooking A to Z
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | November 7, 2007
Tuna casserole and Julia Child? It's hard to believe America's favorite chef used canned foods, but Laura Shapiro writes in her new biography, Julia Child, that Child created just such a recipe while working for S.S. Pierce, a Boston canned food company. She made a version "worthy of any dinner table she knew, including her own," Shapiro writes. Using today's more healthful canned soups and microwaveable brown rice, I've adapted the recipe to fit our busy lives. Comfort food needs comfort wine - in this case, a soft, fruity shiraz.
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | October 12, 2005
When I make brown rice, I can never get the proportion of water to rice correct and end up with rice that is mushy or hard. Help. I finally gave up on figuring out the rice-water proportions on all but the two types of rice I make most frequently at home: Uncle Ben's (1 to 2) and Kokuho Rose Japanese-style rice (1 1/2 to 2). Now, whether I am making brown rice, red rice, black rice, basmati rice or wild rice, I follow this method: Bring a large pot of water to boil as if you were making pasta.
NEWS
By ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION | March 5, 2006
Lettuce salads can be problematic because of the wilt factor; broccoli slaw solves that problem. Combined with a grain or pasta, it makes a hearty, healthful, portable salad base. This is an especially nice vegetarian combo. And total preparation time is about 5 minutes ... how much easier could this be? BROWN RICE SALAD WITH ORANGES AND BROCCOLI SLAW MAKES 4 SERVINGS 1 (8.8-ounce) pouch precooked whole-grain brown rice 1 / 2 (12-ounce) bag broccoli slaw 1 (14-ounce) can mandarin orange sections, drained 1 / 3 cup sunflower seeds 1 / 2 cup bottled ginger dressing Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste Prepare rice according to package directions.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | April 19, 1995
Q: When I was in France, the Grey Poupon mustard I ate was very fiery. I can't seem to find the same heat intensity in the Grey Poupon mustard in the States. Is there a reason for this?A: Yes. When the Grey Poupon mustard is processed initially, it is intensely hot due to the volatile oils that are released when the seeds are crushed. Grey Poupon actually holds the product for three to six months before it is shipped to the United States, allowing it to mellow a bit for our palate.You may even find that individual jars of mustard in this country vary in heat level because the heat of the mustard crop itself varies from season to season.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN | March 30, 2009
When you're buying Uncle Ben's 90-second rice packs, it pays to read the fine print. The Whole Grain Brown version has just a trace of sodium, but if you go for the medley of brown and wild rice, which says in small type on the package that it's "perfectly seasoned with herbs and spices," you'll end up with 730 milligrams sodium per cup. Kate Shatzkin Uncle Ben's Ready Rice Whole Grain Brown Per cup: 240 calories 5 grams protein 3 grams fat ...
FEATURES
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | December 22, 2007
No time for food shopping during this busy holiday season? Keep frozen shrimp, tomato salsa, rice and frozen broccoli on hand for a no-fuss dinner. I prefer mild salsa in this recipe. If you like more fire, use a medium or hot salsa. Toss the shrimp with the salsa and cook the broccoli and rice together. I like to keep pine nuts on hand to add extra zip to recipes. Sprinkle some on the cooked shrimp. Most of the shrimp we buy is frozen and then defrosted for sale. Ask at the seafood counter for shrimp that is still frozen or grab a bag from the freezer case.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | November 7, 2007
Tuna casserole and Julia Child? It's hard to believe America's favorite chef used canned foods, but Laura Shapiro writes in her new biography, Julia Child, that Child created just such a recipe while working for S.S. Pierce, a Boston canned food company. She made a version "worthy of any dinner table she knew, including her own," Shapiro writes. Using today's more healthful canned soups and microwaveable brown rice, I've adapted the recipe to fit our busy lives. Comfort food needs comfort wine - in this case, a soft, fruity shiraz.
NEWS
By SANDRA PINCKNEY | August 5, 2007
Ah, the lazy, hazy, crazy days of summer are here, and gardens are overflowing with fresh vegetables. I went all out this year - planting boxes with turnip, mustard and tender greens, bell peppers, jalapenos, eggplant, tomatoes, scallions, onions, cucumbers and squash. Even though I just planted a few of each vegetable, the harvest is already plentiful. What am I going to do with all this stuff? My grandmother knew just what to do. What she did not use for her family or give away, she canned.
NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | March 28, 2007
Chicken-and-Sausage Jambalaya is a party dish you can make ahead. Mardi Gras may have come and gone, but that's no reason to give up the joys of jambalaya. Perfect for a party any time of year, the traditional Cajun-creole rice casserole is studded with tomatoes, green pepper, celery, onions and bite-size pieces of meat, poultry or seafood. Although rice is the key ingredient, jambalaya's melodic name may derive from the Spanish word for ham, jamon, or the French word, jambon. But there are literally as many recipes for the dish as there are cooks, and modern versions aren't shy about substituting leaner meats, including chicken and turkey sausage.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | February 21, 2007
Picadillo is a popular Latin dish made with ground meat, onions, green bell pepper, tomato sauce and raisins. Using ground buffalo, now available in most supermarkets, adds a new dimension to this 10-minute, no-fuss dinner. Buffalo is a great source of lean protein, with only about 15 percent fat. There are probably as many variations of picadillo as there are people who make it. The success of this dish is the blending of sweet and savory flavors. Picadillo is usually served over rice.
FEATURES
By Copely News Service | May 2, 1993
Most of the rest of the world fills out its meals with rice. We eat rice once in awhile and plain at that. But rice can be the star of the show.Imagine rice with a faintly lemon accent standing by fish! Think of rice with bell pepper, kernels of corn, yellow with turmeric and dancing with the fire of hot pepper sauce and/or cayenne. Or do as the folks in Louisiana do: Toss in mushrooms, nuts and a leek, call the result dirty rice and make a whole meal of it.Any day, every day, is right for rice as the recipes below, adapted from "For Goodness' Sake" by Terry Joyce Blonder (Firefly Books)
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | January 16, 1991
My friend Jan isn't a strict vegetarian. She'll eat a good hamburger or cheese steak like the rest of us. But after work hours she reverts to her native-Californian food consciousness. The I'll-eat-almost-anything-by-day woman turns into an evening-vegan.At least four nights a week she cooks up a meatless meal so she can get her healthful supply of vegetables in the diet, cut the fat and frankly save some money. Because of this she is always hungry for some good vegetarian cookbooks or meatlessrecipes.
NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | February 7, 2007
Side dishes can make or break a diet. So when it comes to making smart choices, a veteran restaurant critic I know offers this rule of thumb: Never eat a starch unless it is "out of the ordinary." That effectively eliminates most mashed potatoes, french fries, pastas and white rice - largely empty carbohydrates with low nutritional value and just average flavor. What's left? Brown rice, whose chewy texture can break up mealtime monotony and boost nutrition. The government recently advised Americans to eat three servings daily of whole grains, which have been linked to a lower risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.
NEWS
By ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION | March 5, 2006
Lettuce salads can be problematic because of the wilt factor; broccoli slaw solves that problem. Combined with a grain or pasta, it makes a hearty, healthful, portable salad base. This is an especially nice vegetarian combo. And total preparation time is about 5 minutes ... how much easier could this be? BROWN RICE SALAD WITH ORANGES AND BROCCOLI SLAW MAKES 4 SERVINGS 1 (8.8-ounce) pouch precooked whole-grain brown rice 1 / 2 (12-ounce) bag broccoli slaw 1 (14-ounce) can mandarin orange sections, drained 1 / 3 cup sunflower seeds 1 / 2 cup bottled ginger dressing Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste Prepare rice according to package directions.
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