Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBrown Family
IN THE NEWS

Brown Family

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Orange County Register | October 21, 1994
IRVINE, Calif. -- The family of Nicole Brown Simpson plans to create a foundation for battered women in her name and to immerse themselves in the fight against domestic violence, the slain woman's mother and sisters said yesterday.Juditha Brown again declined to say whether she believes that her murdered daughter was a battered woman."That's not an answer I can give yet," Mrs. Brown said. "We have to wait a while longer on that."In 1989, O. J. Simpson -- now on trial for the murders of his former wife and her friend Ronald L. Goldman -- pleaded no contest to abusing Ms. Simpson.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Baltimore is poised to pay a $200,000 settlement to the family of a Marine veteran killed outside a Mount Vernon nightclub by an off-duty police officer in June 2010. Though Gahiji Tshamba was not on the job when he shot 32-year-old Tyrone Brown 12 times, the victim's family argued in court filings that the city should share responsibility for the incident because Tshamba remained on the police force after several other off-duty arrests. The settlement, due for consideration Wednesday by the Board of Estimates, would conclude a $270 million federal lawsuit filed in 2011 against police commanders, the state and the city.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By John Steadman | June 16, 1993
SPRINGFIELD, N.J. -- What David G. Brown brings with him to the U.S. Open Golf Championship is an incongruous nickname -- "Moose." At 5-foot-6, 145 pounds, it doesn't fit, even remotely.Then, when he rips a golf ball over ample acres of real estate, there's reason to reconsider and quickly agree that, yes, he is a "Moose."The "Moose from Baltimore" started out as one of 5,905 entries worldwide, seeking to earn a position in one of the most historic of all golfing tests. Tomorrow he will be in the elite starting field that has been reduced to 156 places.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2012
Christopher Brown's family and other supporters gathered in Towson again to protest what they believe are weak charges brought against the police officer charged in the teen's death. The crowd gathered outside the Baltimore County Circuit courthouse Monday - exactly two months after Brown's death - to lobby the state's attorney's office to consider murder charges against James D. Laboard. The Baltimore County officer faces manslaughter charges. The family's attorney, Russell Neverdon, said he believes Laboard could have received a stricter second-degree murder charge given that Laboard chased Brown before the teen died from asphyxiation.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Baltimore is poised to pay a $200,000 settlement to the family of a Marine veteran killed outside a Mount Vernon nightclub by an off-duty police officer in June 2010. Though Gahiji Tshamba was not on the job when he shot 32-year-old Tyrone Brown 12 times, the victim's family argued in court filings that the city should share responsibility for the incident because Tshamba remained on the police force after several other off-duty arrests. The settlement, due for consideration Wednesday by the Board of Estimates, would conclude a $270 million federal lawsuit filed in 2011 against police commanders, the state and the city.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2012
Christen Brown won't ever forget the phone call she received just before 4 a.m. June 14 - when she learned her little brother had died after an altercation with a police officer. "I just wouldn't believe it," she said Monday evening at a rally in Towson, describing the phone call from her mother. About 50 members of Christopher Brown's family and community, as well as others, gathered outside the Baltimore County Courts Building to protest what they believe to be preferential treatment of an off-duty officer charged in the 17-year-old's death.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, Jessica Anderson and Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2012
The teens were throwing rocks and ringing doorbells at random houses in their Randallstown neighborhood — mischief so common they borrowed a name long linked to pranksters' shenanigans: "knicker-knocking. " Christopher Brown had expressed disapproval of the vandalism that had residents complaining to police. But a friend said the high school junior and church usher — dubbed "Mr. Congeniality" by his teachers — reluctantly agreed to join the prowl late Wednesday. They approached a house on Susanna Road, according to a friend, who said he accompanied a separate group trailing behind Brown.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff writer | October 23, 1991
Camouflaged from head to toe, with a night vision scope for seeing and a "whisper microphone" for talking, Dean D'Camera crawled into thewoods to take up surveillance of the Brown family's house on Spring Road in Laurel's rural Bacontown section.And he carried his gun. The suspected drug dealers inside would be coming out to patrol the property's perimeter, carrying flashlights and weapons, leading a pit bull on a leash."We pretty much laid on our bellies in the bushes. I guess we were 50 feet from the house," Officer D'Camera recalled.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2004
A New York auction of more than 300 pieces of space memorabilia took in more than $443,000 over the weekend, including $18,400 paid by a Scarsdale lawyer for a plastic toothbrush carried to the moon by Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin. But two of the most poignant items in the sale - a flight suit and helmet offered by the family of Columbia astronaut David Brown - were withdrawn after NASA told the family the equipment was still government property. Officials at Swann Galleries said the two Brown items had been expected to sell for at least $48,000.
NEWS
March 25, 2001
IN HIS 22 years as a "Wall Street Week" panelist, fund manager Eddie C. Brown has shown his prowess as a stock picker. "I believe in investing to promote growth and achievement," he explains. He is putting some family money where his mouth is. He and his wife, Sylvia, are donating $6 million to the Maryland Institute, College of Arts, which will name its soon-to-be-built Center for Art & Design Technology in honor of the Brown family. When the Bolton Hill college's main building was constructed after the Great Fire of 1904, Andrew Carnegie was the major donor.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2012
Christen Brown won't ever forget the phone call she received just before 4 a.m. June 14 - when she learned her little brother had died after an altercation with a police officer. "I just wouldn't believe it," she said Monday evening at a rally in Towson, describing the phone call from her mother. About 50 members of Christopher Brown's family and community, as well as others, gathered outside the Baltimore County Courts Building to protest what they believe to be preferential treatment of an off-duty officer charged in the 17-year-old's death.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
A Baltimore County police officer was indicted Wednesday in the death of a Randallstown teen, but the charges drew criticism from the boy's mother and the community, who continued calls for an outside investigation. James D. Laboard, a nine-year veteran, faces charges of voluntary and involuntary manslaughter in the asphyxiation death of 17-year-old Christopher Brown, whom police said he chased after a group of teens threw a rock at his front door on June 13. Each count carries a maximum of 10 years in prison.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, Jessica Anderson and Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2012
The teens were throwing rocks and ringing doorbells at random houses in their Randallstown neighborhood — mischief so common they borrowed a name long linked to pranksters' shenanigans: "knicker-knocking. " Christopher Brown had expressed disapproval of the vandalism that had residents complaining to police. But a friend said the high school junior and church usher — dubbed "Mr. Congeniality" by his teachers — reluctantly agreed to join the prowl late Wednesday. They approached a house on Susanna Road, according to a friend, who said he accompanied a separate group trailing behind Brown.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
As Jamie Brown shifts his gaze upward and squints at a pair of tall barns backed by a cloudless October sky, the reverence in his voice is nearly as clear as the autumn sun's rays. All around him at Triadelphia Lake View Farm, families are taking advantage of an unusually pretty day to pet farm animals, take hayrides and pick pumpkins. Layers of peeling red paint on the barns distinguish the two oldest structures on the 100-acre Glenelg farm at the end of meandering Triadelphia Road.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2010
Even the rich shared their homes with strangers in order to make ends meet in early Maryland. And their children, like the children of the working class and the slaves, were given household responsibilities at the youngest ages. Visitors to Historic London Town and Gardens, a 23-acre park featuring history and archaeology in southern Anne Arundel County, can now get an intimate look at the lives of three families as they lived when this town was Maryland's most important port city.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | May 3, 2009
On the Monday after that horrible winter weekend last year, when everyone was still in shock about the Browning family - a mother and father shot to death by their teenage son, two boys shot to death by their older brother - Jonathan Sindler, the band director at Cockeysville Middle School, saw a hand go up among his students. The shootings had claimed two from his percussion section - Greg, 14, and Ben, 11 - and the boys and girls who had played with the Browning brothers wanted to do something.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2002
Investor Eddie C. Brown announced yesterday that his family's foundation would donate $5 million to provide educational and personal support to Baltimore's African-American middle-school children. The Turning the Corner Achievement Program will focus on two of Baltimore's poorest neighborhoods, providing academic help in addition to health, social and employment services. The targeted neighborhoods, one on each side of the city, will be selected later this year. Last year, the Brown family donated $6 million to the Maryland Institute College of Art for a new campus building and created a $1 million endowment at the Enoch Pratt Free Library.
NEWS
By RONA MARECH AND MARY GAIL HARE and RONA MARECH AND MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTERS | December 2, 2005
The Brown family of Louisiana fled Hurricane Katrina with nothing. The DiMaggio family and its Westminster church, the Firm Foundation Worship Center, had a vacant home and the desire to help. But what seemed like a fortunate connection gradually dissolved into a flurry of accusations and bruised feelings. Sandra and Keith Brown, who drove to Carroll County after the hurricane with seven of their eight children, say their hosts were patronizing and disrespectful. The DiMaggios said the Browns left the house in disarray and didn't appreciate all the community had done for them.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Justin Fenton and Julie Scharper and Justin Fenton,Sun reporters | February 10, 2008
As mourners shuffled into pews, images flashed on a screen above the altar: The couple dancing on their wedding day, the husband's strong arms wrapped around his wife. Their three sons posing in Christmas sweaters, all chubby cheeks and big smiles. The boys in recent years, shaggy-haired and gangly, clowning on a snow-covered mountain. Throughout the church, parents clutched their adolescent children, looked at the photos of a family who appeared very much like them, and wept. Nearly 1,300 people gathered in a Baltimore County church yesterday to remember the Browning family - parents John, 45, and Tamara, 44, and their sons Greg, 14, and Ben, 11, who were fatally shot in their Cockeysville home last weekend.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.