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Brown Decision

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NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 18, 1994
BELTSVILLE -- Celebrating the 40th anniversary of the Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka decision yesterday, President Clinton visited a middle school named after civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., where Mr. Clinton played the roles of teacher and mentor."
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NEWS
May 20, 2014
I read with some interest Paul Marx's commentary about the anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education ( "60 years after 'Brown,' mixed results," May 16). I concur wholeheartedly with Mr. Marx's assessment that the Brown decision was a hallmark for equity in our country and that cities need better schools if they are to retain residents. His remaining conclusions deserve a second look. The intent of the Brown decision was to ensure that every child gets a quality education regardless of the color of his or her skin.
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NEWS
By Nicholas Lemann | May 20, 1994
HALF an inch beneath the surface of this week's triumphant rhetoric about the 40th anniversary of the Supreme Court's ruling in Brown vs. Board of Education is a prevailing view that Brown has a mixed, even disappointing legacy -- that it engendered dreams of racial integration that have failed to come true.That assessment is grossly unfair.The Brown decision was meant to end legally segregated public school systems and it did so, in a way that forever changed the racial consciousness of the nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ray Jenkins and Ray Jenkins,Special to the Sun | May 16, 2004
In this 50th-anniversary celebration of the Supreme Court's epochal Brown vs. Board of Education decision, which held school segregation to be unconstitutional, it is almost a national heresy to pose the question: Was this decision really necessary? Merely to ask puts the questioner in dubious company. After all, the very first book -- if you can call it that -- about the Brown decision was a screed titled Black Monday. The author was an obscure Mississippi judge named Tom P. Brady, and although the book was self-published, it was an instant best-seller that swept the Deep South like the boll weevil and became the bible around which the White Citizens Council, a kind of coat-and-tie version of the Ku Klux Klan, took root throughout the region.
NEWS
May 17, 1994
On the 40th anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court's Brown vs. Board of Education decision, the nation might well ponder the paradox presented by the historic ruling aimed at ending racial segregation in the nation's public schools. As The Sun's Lyle Denniston noted in a Perspective article Sunday, Brown struck down the 58-year-old doctrine of "separate but equal" in education and heralded the end of America's version of apartheid. At the same time, however, its promise of a nation indivisible is not yet fulfilled.
NEWS
By Samuel L. Banks | May 15, 1991
FRIDAY'S 37th anniversary of the Supreme Court's histori Brown decision, which declared racial segregation unconstitutional in the public schools, will be observed with very scant attention, hoopla or ceremonial proclamations and speeches.As it does in 1991, the Brown decision in 1954 caused national ambivalence and apprehension. In fact, the decision reflected a kind of unsettling duality insofar as black and white citizens were concerned.Blacks greeted the ruling, by and large, with jubilation and euphoria; whites, especially in the South, greeted it with brooding unease and incredulity.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 22, 2003
SIX MONTHS before the 50th anniversary of the Supreme Court's Brown vs. Board of Education decision, observances commemorating the event are under way. Baltimore had two in as many days. Wednesday marked the 25th anniversary of the Black Jewish Forum of Baltimore -- better known as the BLEWS. The BLEWS put on a gala celebration dinner that honored former City Councilwoman Victorine Q. Adams. Also on the program was Baltimore attorney Larry Gibson giving a retrospective on how black and Jewish lawyers helped bring about changes in civil rights.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ray Jenkins and Ray Jenkins,Special to the Sun | May 16, 2004
In this 50th-anniversary celebration of the Supreme Court's epochal Brown vs. Board of Education decision, which held school segregation to be unconstitutional, it is almost a national heresy to pose the question: Was this decision really necessary? Merely to ask puts the questioner in dubious company. After all, the very first book -- if you can call it that -- about the Brown decision was a screed titled Black Monday. The author was an obscure Mississippi judge named Tom P. Brady, and although the book was self-published, it was an instant best-seller that swept the Deep South like the boll weevil and became the bible around which the White Citizens Council, a kind of coat-and-tie version of the Ku Klux Klan, took root throughout the region.
NEWS
September 12, 1991
As the confirmation hearings for Clarence Thomas for the U.S. Supreme Court began this week, these thoughts occurred:The 1954 Supreme Court decision known as Brown vs. Board of Education, which declared school segregation unconstitutional, was just a year old when Clarence Thomas entered a segregated grade school in Georgia. Throughout the South there was fierce resistance to the Brown decision, with many state governors openly defying the law of the land. Whether desegregation could be accomplished was anything but a certainty.
NEWS
May 20, 2014
I read with some interest Paul Marx's commentary about the anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education ( "60 years after 'Brown,' mixed results," May 16). I concur wholeheartedly with Mr. Marx's assessment that the Brown decision was a hallmark for equity in our country and that cities need better schools if they are to retain residents. His remaining conclusions deserve a second look. The intent of the Brown decision was to ensure that every child gets a quality education regardless of the color of his or her skin.
TOPIC
May 16, 2004
1857: The Dred Scott decision, written by Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney of Maryland, rules that black people cannot be U.S. citizens and have "no rights which the white man was bound to respect." 1865: After the Civil War, Southern state governments start establishing Black Codes, restricting the rights of freed blacks. 1866: The Civil Rights Act of 1866 gives blacks basic economic rights such as to enter into contracts and to own property. 1868: Blacks are made citizens with ratification of the 14th Amendment.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 8, 2004
AUGUST 1950, three years and nine months B.B. (before Brown vs. Board of Education): Freeman A. Hrabowski III is born in the segregated world of Birmingham, Ala. December 1951, two years and five months B.B.: Gregory Kane is born in the just as segregated world of Baltimore, Md. The story of the Supreme Court decision in Brown vs. Board of Education, which will have a 50th-anniversary something - celebration just doesn't seem quite the right word -...
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2004
The stage company was made up of modern-day judges, journalists and students - products of school systems without racial barriers. But their words evoked a time when skin color dictated educational opportunities. In a Center Stage production, Brown v. Board Revisited: A Commemoration and Community Forum, a cast that included leaders from Baltimore's legal and media communities offered a look back at the Supreme Court's 1954 decision to integrate schools. "We are ready for integration," said Elizabeth M. Hewlett, chairwoman of the Maryland National Capital Park and Planning Commission and a cast member, reading the text of a newspaper article printed in Baltimore's Afro-American a half-century ago. "We have been ready since we were born."
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2004
Freeman A. Hrabowski III helped mark many civil rights milestones in education last year - the 40th anniversaries of blacks at Clemson University in South Carolina and in the medical school of Duke University, and the 35th anniversary of the integration of Vanderbilt University medical school. Next month will be the 50th anniversary of Brown vs. Board of Education. Hrabowski, president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, started first grade in segregated Birmingham, Ala., schools the year that the Supreme Court ruled segregation unconstitutional.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 7, 2004
IT HAS been nearly 50 years since that early fall day when John Steele was a City College senior - so long ago that Steele at one time thought the incident happened in the spring. Several months before - May 17, 1954, to be precise - the Supreme Court had handed down its decision in the Brown vs. Board of Education case, outlawing segregated public schools. On that fall day in 1954, students from Mergenthaler Vocational Technical High School - which back then was working-class and lily-white - left school early in the morning to march to school headquarters - then on 25th Street - not to praise the Brown decision, but to condemn it. They would not, the white students said, go to school with black people.
NEWS
By Linda Carty and Paula C. Johnson | March 29, 2004
THE CHOICE is ours: Will the Brown vs. Board of Education decision become a historic relic, trotted out every 50 years for ceremonial commemorations, or will it become an actualized hallmark of a fair, just and inclusive society? With the Brown decision in 1954, the Supreme Court and the nation finally laid to rest the ignoble history of racial segregation at all levels of public education and, by extension, all other areas of American life. Or so it appeared. The years after the Brown decision brought tremendous social upheaval as the civil rights movement gathered force and the violent reaction of many whites to these changes produced vehement acts of intolerance.
NEWS
By LYLE DENNISTON | October 7, 1990
Every now and then, there is a moment in the Supreme Court, sometimes only a fleeting one, to remind the visitor how very much different that place is now in the aftermath of the "Reagan revolution."That happened last week. Not surprisingly, the reminding incident involved Justice Antonin Scalia, the member of the court who seems most like what former President Ronald Reagan wanted in a justice: a committed conservative, deeply devoted to very traditional views of constitutionalism. When one thinks of the major impact Mr. Reagan's presidency has had on the American judiciary, it is easiest to think first of Justice Scalia.
NEWS
By Linda Carty and Paula C. Johnson | March 29, 2004
THE CHOICE is ours: Will the Brown vs. Board of Education decision become a historic relic, trotted out every 50 years for ceremonial commemorations, or will it become an actualized hallmark of a fair, just and inclusive society? With the Brown decision in 1954, the Supreme Court and the nation finally laid to rest the ignoble history of racial segregation at all levels of public education and, by extension, all other areas of American life. Or so it appeared. The years after the Brown decision brought tremendous social upheaval as the civil rights movement gathered force and the violent reaction of many whites to these changes produced vehement acts of intolerance.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 22, 2003
SIX MONTHS before the 50th anniversary of the Supreme Court's Brown vs. Board of Education decision, observances commemorating the event are under way. Baltimore had two in as many days. Wednesday marked the 25th anniversary of the Black Jewish Forum of Baltimore -- better known as the BLEWS. The BLEWS put on a gala celebration dinner that honored former City Councilwoman Victorine Q. Adams. Also on the program was Baltimore attorney Larry Gibson giving a retrospective on how black and Jewish lawyers helped bring about changes in civil rights.
NEWS
June 6, 1995
Alex. Brown Inc.'s decision to stay downtown and take up residence in a 30-story skyscraper that will carry its name are reasons for celebrating. If nothing rocks the deal, it should be a boon for the Baltimore Street corridor.The Alex. Brown move, by March 1997, would bring occupancy in Commerce Place to 80 percent. What a change. Since its opening in 1992 during the recession, Commerce Place has been largely empty. Bringing nearly 1,000 professionals into the building should prove a boost to the entire area.
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