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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | December 22, 1993
The best Christmas special ever made for TV is on tonight -- for the 26th time, but still as watchable and delightful as ever. Also on tap: a memory-stirring (or, if you're a bit younger, merely stirring) documentary about, and titled, "1968."* "A Charlie Brown Christmas" (8-8:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Right up there with "The Wizard of Oz," this 1967 animated special, based on the beloved Charles Schulz cartoons, is an annual TV tradition: viewers who watched it as kids, with their parents, now are parents watching it with THEIR kids.
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NEWS
September 6, 2008
BILL MELENDEZ, 91 "Peanuts" animator Bill Melendez, an Emmy-winning animator who brought Charlie Brown and the Peanuts gang to blithe, blockheaded life on television and in films - and who helped keep them alive after the death of their creator, Charles M. Schulz - died Tuesday in Santa Monica, Calif. He was 91 and lived in Los Angeles. Mr. Melendez's son, Steven, confirmed the death, saying his father had been in declining health after a fall last year. One of the very few Hispanics in the business when he began his career in the 1930s, Mr. Melendez was the only animator Schulz allowed to shepherd his characters onto the screen.
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NEWS
November 25, 2004
The Carroll County Arts Council will hold its seventh annual "Festival of Wreaths" Wednesday through Dec. 5 at the Carroll Arts Center in downtown Westminster. The festival will feature a record 200 theme wreaths on display for a five-day silent auction. All proceeds benefit Arts Council programs. In addition to bidding on wreaths, people are invited to vote for their favorite. Awards in several categories will be presented the afternoon of Dec. 4. These original wreaths are adorned with a wide array of items and decorations, including $50 bills, Lance Armstrong LiveStrong bracelets, wine corks, books and stuffed animals.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,sun television critic | November 25, 2007
Shrek the Halls, a new Christmas special featuring that cash cow of an ogre from the big screen, has yet to be shown on TV, but ABC is already calling it an "instant classic." Foolish me, I thought it was the audience that determines which shows are classics -- and that such calls are made only after decades of joyous viewing. Still, as bombastic as the claim might be, it prompts the question as to what makes for a holiday TV classic -- especially this week with the arrival of wall-to-wall, prime-time Christmas programming.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2006
Downloaded singles 1.Irreplaceable, Beyonce 2.Say It Right, Nelly Furtado 3.Fergalicious, Fergie 4.How to Save a Life, The Fray 5.All I Want for Christmas Is You, Mariah Carey [ITUNES] Downloaded albums 1.Wintersong, Sarah McLachlan 2.Let It Snow! EP, Michael Buble 3.A Charlie Brown Christmas (remastered), Vince Guaraldi Trio 4.Daughtry (bonus track), Daughtry 5.The Inspiration (bonus track version), Young Jeezy [ITUNES] Downloaded TV episodes 1.A Benihana Christmas, Parts 1 and 2, The Office 2.The Eye of Jupiter, Battlestar Galactica 3.The Passage, Battlestar Galactica 4.The Convict, The Office 5.Fallout, Heroes [ITUNES]
FEATURES
By Dave Walker and Dave Walker,ARIZONA REPUBLIC | December 6, 1995
Before Dec. 9, 1965, you called a scrawny Christmas tree a scrawny Christmas tree. After that date, it had a name: a Charlie Brown tree.Can it be 30 years since "A Charlie Brown Christmas" first aired? Good grief, it's true.A downbeat mixture of clumsy animation, anti-commercial propaganda, "cool" jazz and a touch of Christian proselytizing, "A Charlie Brown Christmas," which airs tonight at 8 p.m. on WJZ (Channel 13), was unloved and underestimated by nearly everyone involved with its creation, including "Peanuts" creator Charles M. Schulz.
NEWS
September 6, 2008
BILL MELENDEZ, 91 "Peanuts" animator Bill Melendez, an Emmy-winning animator who brought Charlie Brown and the Peanuts gang to blithe, blockheaded life on television and in films - and who helped keep them alive after the death of their creator, Charles M. Schulz - died Tuesday in Santa Monica, Calif. He was 91 and lived in Los Angeles. Mr. Melendez's son, Steven, confirmed the death, saying his father had been in declining health after a fall last year. One of the very few Hispanics in the business when he began his career in the 1930s, Mr. Melendez was the only animator Schulz allowed to shepherd his characters onto the screen.
FEATURES
December 3, 2005
All Day Buck Stops / Dozens of Baltimore attractions, including numerous museums, the Maryland Zoo, the Maryland Science Center and the Top of the World observation level at the World Trade Center, offer admission for $1 or less during certain hours (also tomorrow at some attractions). Go online to godowntownbaltimore.com or call 410-244-1030. 9 a.m. Classic Cars / Warm up with hot rods at the East Coast Indoor Nationals Car Show. About 300 pre-1973 cars will be featured, along with a marketplace, Santa and celebrities.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | December 7, 1994
The odds against it happening are very high, but tonight TV provides a sort of holiday miracle: two watchable Christmas specials on the same night. One is from 1965 -- and that's the newer one. The other, seen for the first time since it was performed live on the DuMont network, is from 1951.* "A Charlie Brown Christmas" (8-8:30 p.m., Channel 11) -- Vince Guaraldi's jazz score is terrific. Linus' lecture about the true meaning of Christmas is right on the money -- and right about the money, too. Then there's the Snoopy dance, seen in animated form for the first time -- and that scrawny Christmas tree, which Charlie Brown identifies with for all the right reasons.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK | November 25, 2007
Don't come looking for good tidings, joy and phony holiday sentiment in this list. It is a weird group, but these are my favorites, for better or worse - and all are available on DVD. 1. Truman Capote's A Christmas Memory. Set in the Great Depression and narrated by the author himself, this touching and classy 1966 production for ABC tells the story of an outcast boy and his eccentric aunt as they set out to bake fruitcakes for the holiday - even for people who are mean to them. 2. Thirtysomething - "Mike Van Dyke."
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK | November 25, 2007
Don't come looking for good tidings, joy and phony holiday sentiment in this list. It is a weird group, but these are my favorites, for better or worse - and all are available on DVD. 1. Truman Capote's A Christmas Memory. Set in the Great Depression and narrated by the author himself, this touching and classy 1966 production for ABC tells the story of an outcast boy and his eccentric aunt as they set out to bake fruitcakes for the holiday - even for people who are mean to them. 2. Thirtysomething - "Mike Van Dyke."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2006
Downloaded singles 1.Irreplaceable, Beyonce 2.Say It Right, Nelly Furtado 3.Fergalicious, Fergie 4.How to Save a Life, The Fray 5.All I Want for Christmas Is You, Mariah Carey [ITUNES] Downloaded albums 1.Wintersong, Sarah McLachlan 2.Let It Snow! EP, Michael Buble 3.A Charlie Brown Christmas (remastered), Vince Guaraldi Trio 4.Daughtry (bonus track), Daughtry 5.The Inspiration (bonus track version), Young Jeezy [ITUNES] Downloaded TV episodes 1.A Benihana Christmas, Parts 1 and 2, The Office 2.The Eye of Jupiter, Battlestar Galactica 3.The Passage, Battlestar Galactica 4.The Convict, The Office 5.Fallout, Heroes [ITUNES]
FEATURES
December 3, 2005
All Day Buck Stops / Dozens of Baltimore attractions, including numerous museums, the Maryland Zoo, the Maryland Science Center and the Top of the World observation level at the World Trade Center, offer admission for $1 or less during certain hours (also tomorrow at some attractions). Go online to godowntownbaltimore.com or call 410-244-1030. 9 a.m. Classic Cars / Warm up with hot rods at the East Coast Indoor Nationals Car Show. About 300 pre-1973 cars will be featured, along with a marketplace, Santa and celebrities.
NEWS
November 25, 2004
The Carroll County Arts Council will hold its seventh annual "Festival of Wreaths" Wednesday through Dec. 5 at the Carroll Arts Center in downtown Westminster. The festival will feature a record 200 theme wreaths on display for a five-day silent auction. All proceeds benefit Arts Council programs. In addition to bidding on wreaths, people are invited to vote for their favorite. Awards in several categories will be presented the afternoon of Dec. 4. These original wreaths are adorned with a wide array of items and decorations, including $50 bills, Lance Armstrong LiveStrong bracelets, wine corks, books and stuffed animals.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 9, 2001
It's August, and things are getting mighty interesting over at Toby's Dinner Theatre in Columbia. For even as the old Washington Senators are winning the pennant nightly in the theater's excellent production of Damn Yankees, there have been sightings of a canine, World War I flying ace piloting his doghouse over the skies of France. A little boy has been heard singing to his security blanket, of all things, while a young musician plunks out Beethoven's "Moonlight Sonata" on a toy piano as he is harassed by the terminal fussbudget who adores him. All this can mean one thing: Charlie Brown, Snoopy, Lucy, Schroeder, Linus and the gang have taken up residence at the area's premier dinner theater where the musical You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown will play for several performances through the month.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2000
Christmas has to have holly, mistletoe - and holiday specials featuring the likes of Kathie Lee Gifford, Martha Stewart and Donny and Marie. Over the years, a handful of holiday favorites have emerged, thanks to the inspired work of writers and performers ranging from Dr. Seuss and Frank Capra to Jean Shepherd and Sonny and Cher. And thanks to the magic of TV, we get to relive the experience of watching them every year. For those hoping TV will help sustain that holiday mood over the coming weeks, here are 10 movies or television shows worth scheduling time for. The list is far from exhaustive - heck, the hopelessly addicted could probably spend four or five TV hours a day immersed in yuletide cheer right up to Christmas evening - but for the choosy, this is the way to go: "Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas" (7 p.m. Dec. 4 and 8 p.m. Dec. 24, Cartoon Network)
NEWS
By BETH HANNAN | December 3, 1992
I've been a ''Peanuts'' fan for years. I've literally grown up with the ''Peanuts'' specials. ''It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown'' and ''A Charlie Brown Christmas'' are as traditional in my house as pumpkins and Christmas trees.But I have a question.Why haven't there been any ''Peanuts'' for the Jewish holidays?There have been ''Peanuts'' specials for almost every holiday including Arbor Day, and that special was created prior to the recent flourishing of the environmental movement. ''Peanuts'' specials have always been educational, whether the message is subtle, such as standing up for your beliefs as Linus did in ''The Great Pumpkin,'' or overt, such as the ''Why, Charlie Brown, Why?
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 2000
Amazing, isn't it, that it took a cartoon beagle to teach most Americans what little they came to know of the First World War. Or that culturally illiterate baby boomers who confuse "Madame Butterfly" with Iron Butterfly can pick Ludwig van Beethoven's face out a lineup in a heartbeat, thanks to a cartoon pianist whose toy piano had a bust of the composer's dour visage perched atop it. Where would we be without Snoopy, Schroeder, Charlie Brown and...
NEWS
December 24, 1999
ANNAPOLIS' official Christmas tree has been described as an ugly, out-of-place jumble. That may be a charitable impression.Rakes and pitchforks poke through the pine branches instead of candy canes and popcorn balls. Corn, soybeans, sorghum and tobacco replace garland, icicles, ornaments and tinsel. It's as if "It's a Wonderful Life" has been preempted by "Green Acres."Famously tasteful Annapolitans are aghast. Some contend this is worse than last year, when a mannequin in a rain slicker adorned the tree near City Dock.
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