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By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | July 6, 1995
It survived the Great Fire of 1904, but will it survive the Great Move of 1997?That's the issue confronting the historic Alexander Brown & Sons building at 135 E. Baltimore St., a brick-and-granite landmark that is likely to be vacated as a result of the investment banking firm's recent decision to consolidate nearly 1,000 downtown employees in the Commerce Place office tower at 1 South St.Although Brown's decision to stay downtown has been hailed as...
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 4, 2011
Keith Myers Brown, a retired Carroll County builder and big-game hunter, died Saturday of a cardiac arrest at Carroll Hospice Dove House in Westminster. The longtime Taneytown resident was 86. The son of a schoolteacher and a homemaker, Mr. Brown was born and raised in Union Mills. He was a graduate of Charles Carroll High School. A lifelong trumpet player, during his teenage years he played with the Westminster Municipal Band, William F. Myers Band, and the Lyric Concert Band of Hanover, Pa. During the 1940s and 1950s, he was a member of several Carroll County dance bands.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1998
A local commercial real estate group named the 30-story Alex. Brown Building as the top downtown office building during an awards ceremony last night.The Building Owners and Managers Association based the award on the 475,000-square-foot building's management and operation. The 1 South St. building, managed by Cushman & Wakefield Inc. and completed in 1992, was purchased last month by a Philadelphia company for roughly $85 million.BOMA also presented Building of the Year awards to 11 other commercial properties.
BUSINESS
By LORRAINE MIRABELLA and LORRAINE MIRABELLA,SUN REPORTER | November 15, 2005
Two of downtown Baltimore's signature office towers - the Alex. Brown Building at 1 South St. and the Wachovia Tower at 7 St. Paul Street - are close to being sold, signaling growing interest from investors in Baltimore's commercial market. Miami-based America's Capital Partners, one of the biggest owners of office buildings in South Florida, is expected to purchase the 30-story Alex. Brown Building, considered one of the most recognizable on the downtown skyline, from Resource America Inc. of Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1998
The New York investment company that bought the Alex. Brown Building for $80 million in March is working to sell the skyscraper as part of a potential portfolio sale of real estate assets, sources said.The Blackstone Group's decision to sell the 30-story office tower at 1 South St. comes amid a flurry of sales of signature downtown buildings, including 100 E. Pratt St. and 250 W. Pratt St.As in the case of the 28-story 100 E. Pratt and the 26-story 250 W. Pratt, the likely buyer of the Alex.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1997
In an age when most banks are gearing up for the electronic future as it's likely to unfold in Bill Gates' cyberspace, Baltimore's newest financial institution looks more like a scene out of Charles Dickens' London.When Chevy Chase Bank opens its first Baltimore-area branch Nov. 12, tellers will greet customers from inside an old-time banking cage, while managers toil by lamplight at roll-top desks.The building has the sort of grandeur that hasn't been seen in decades: Floors of marble from the same Italian quarry where Michelangelo got his stone.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | October 23, 1997
"X Site 97" is the Contemporary Museum's latest project. Two artists, Teresita Fernandez of Miami and Quisqueya Henriquez of the Dominican Republic, will create an installation in a raw, unfinished space on the ground floor of the Alex. Brown building downtown. Their conceptual work, which involves use of color and arrangement of materials, will be seen in the context of concrete walls and floors and metal ducts.Fernandez manipulates translucent materials and employs techniques of illusion to lead viewers to question their perceptions.
NEWS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | March 13, 1998
A New York investment firm has purchased the 30-story Alex. Brown Building for roughly $80 million, continuing the interest by out-of-town investors in downtown Baltimore's signature office towers.Blackstone Group's purchase of the skyscraper at 1 South St. was the third major central business district property to change hands in a year. The others were 100 E. Pratt St. and 250 W. Pratt St."I think this is simply another strong indication of the rebound of the real estate market and investment grade properties in the region and the central business district," said Robert A. Manekin, president of Casey & Associates Inc., a leading local real estate firm.
BUSINESS
By LORRAINE MIRABELLA and LORRAINE MIRABELLA,SUN REPORTER | November 15, 2005
Two of downtown Baltimore's signature office towers - the Alex. Brown Building at 1 South St. and the Wachovia Tower at 7 St. Paul Street - are close to being sold, signaling growing interest from investors in Baltimore's commercial market. Miami-based America's Capital Partners, one of the biggest owners of office buildings in South Florida, is expected to purchase the 30-story Alex. Brown Building, considered one of the most recognizable on the downtown skyline, from Resource America Inc. of Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 15, 1997
THE GOOD NEWS is that the old Alex. Brown Inc. headquarters at Baltimore and Calvert streets -- one of the few downtown buildings to survive the great 1904 fire -- is undergoing a costly interior and exterior refurbishing that will return it to its former glory.The bad news is that just a block away, the old USF&G headquarters, which was built soon after the catastrophic conflagration, is in danger of being demolished.The lesson? That economics drives everything -- even though different people may assess long-term economic viability differently.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2001
In a move that furthers the expansion of the business district to the east, RTKL Associates Inc., the Baltimore architectural firm that has grown into one of the nation's largest, will announce today that it will move its headquarters from a downtown skyscraper to a warehouse-style building it is designing in Fells Point. The firm will move 225 workers from its offices in the signature Deutsche Banc Alex. Brown tower at 1 South St. to a five-story building, to be called Bond Street Wharf, at the foot of Bond Street.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2000
Baltimore's largest architectural firm is designing a seven-story waterfront headquarters in Fells Point that would anchor a six-building, $90 million complex of shops, apartments and offices. RTKL Associates Inc., a 54-year-old firm based in the Alex. Brown building at One South Street downtown, may move its 225 local employees to a 250,000-square-foot office building being planned at the southeast corner of Thames and Bond streets, said Gordon Godat, a vice president of the firm. The firm unveiled a preliminary model of the building, which might feature a curved roof, shops along the street and adjacent waterfront plaza for the public, to city officials yesterday during a discussion of a 6-acre mixed-use development that would extend the Fells Point restaurant and shopping district.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1998
A local commercial real estate group named the 30-story Alex. Brown Building as the top downtown office building during an awards ceremony last night.The Building Owners and Managers Association based the award on the 475,000-square-foot building's management and operation. The 1 South St. building, managed by Cushman & Wakefield Inc. and completed in 1992, was purchased last month by a Philadelphia company for roughly $85 million.BOMA also presented Building of the Year awards to 11 other commercial properties.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1998
The New York investment company that bought the Alex. Brown Building for $80 million in March is working to sell the skyscraper as part of a potential portfolio sale of real estate assets, sources said.The Blackstone Group's decision to sell the 30-story office tower at 1 South St. comes amid a flurry of sales of signature downtown buildings, including 100 E. Pratt St. and 250 W. Pratt St.As in the case of the 28-story 100 E. Pratt and the 26-story 250 W. Pratt, the likely buyer of the Alex.
NEWS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | March 13, 1998
A New York investment firm has purchased the 30-story Alex. Brown Building for roughly $80 million, continuing the interest by out-of-town investors in downtown Baltimore's signature office towers.Blackstone Group's purchase of the skyscraper at 1 South St. was the third major central business district property to change hands in a year. The others were 100 E. Pratt St. and 250 W. Pratt St."I think this is simply another strong indication of the rebound of the real estate market and investment grade properties in the region and the central business district," said Robert A. Manekin, president of Casey & Associates Inc., a leading local real estate firm.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | October 23, 1997
"X Site 97" is the Contemporary Museum's latest project. Two artists, Teresita Fernandez of Miami and Quisqueya Henriquez of the Dominican Republic, will create an installation in a raw, unfinished space on the ground floor of the Alex. Brown building downtown. Their conceptual work, which involves use of color and arrangement of materials, will be seen in the context of concrete walls and floors and metal ducts.Fernandez manipulates translucent materials and employs techniques of illusion to lead viewers to question their perceptions.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2000
Baltimore's largest architectural firm is designing a seven-story waterfront headquarters in Fells Point that would anchor a six-building, $90 million complex of shops, apartments and offices. RTKL Associates Inc., a 54-year-old firm based in the Alex. Brown building at One South Street downtown, may move its 225 local employees to a 250,000-square-foot office building being planned at the southeast corner of Thames and Bond streets, said Gordon Godat, a vice president of the firm. The firm unveiled a preliminary model of the building, which might feature a curved roof, shops along the street and adjacent waterfront plaza for the public, to city officials yesterday during a discussion of a 6-acre mixed-use development that would extend the Fells Point restaurant and shopping district.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2001
In a move that furthers the expansion of the business district to the east, RTKL Associates Inc., the Baltimore architectural firm that has grown into one of the nation's largest, will announce today that it will move its headquarters from a downtown skyscraper to a warehouse-style building it is designing in Fells Point. The firm will move 225 workers from its offices in the signature Deutsche Banc Alex. Brown tower at 1 South St. to a five-story building, to be called Bond Street Wharf, at the foot of Bond Street.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1997
In an age when most banks are gearing up for the electronic future as it's likely to unfold in Bill Gates' cyberspace, Baltimore's newest financial institution looks more like a scene out of Charles Dickens' London.When Chevy Chase Bank opens its first Baltimore-area branch Nov. 12, tellers will greet customers from inside an old-time banking cage, while managers toil by lamplight at roll-top desks.The building has the sort of grandeur that hasn't been seen in decades: Floors of marble from the same Italian quarry where Michelangelo got his stone.
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