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NEWS
October 21, 2004
On October 20, 2004, ROBERT W. BROUSSARD, beloved husband of the late Emma C. Broussard, devoted brother of James and Kathryn Broussard, Thomas and Faye Broussard and Doretta and Johnnie Jones. Also survived by many loving nieces and nephews. Family will receive friends on Friday from 10 A.M. to 12 P.M. with a Service at 12 P.M. at HARRY H. WITZKE'S FAMILY FUNERAL HOME, INC., 4112 Old Columbia Pk., Ellicott City. Interment will follow at Good Shepherd Cemetery in Ellicott City.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | November 13, 2008
Lately, an affected retro soul sound has garnered platinum sales and Grammy Awards for British acts such as Duffy and Amy Winehouse. But Marc Broussard, a boyish-faced Louisiana native, manages to add an emotional depth to his approach, giving his throwback soul an inviting immediacy and a lived-in feel. His voice is warm and rugged, slightly frayed around the edges. It's a sound that belies his 26 years. It's also a sound that has garnered critical kudos, if not big sales. Broussard imbues his soul-pop hybrid with a blues-suffused richness seldom heard in modern pop. Keep Coming Back, his new album and debut for Atlantic Records, sounds as if it could have been recorded in Muscle Shoals, Ala., circa 1972.
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SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | November 7, 1993
LAS VEGAS -- Fighting before only several hundred fans in the first bout of the championship card, unbeaten lightweight contender Sharmba Mitchell (32-0) of Baltimore needed only 2 minutes and 25 seconds to stop Chad Broussard of Lafayette, La., and claim the vacant North American Boxing Federation title.While the celebrity gawkers were waiting outside Caesars Palace to catch a glimpse of VIPs, Mitchell, 23, floored the previously undefeated Broussard (34-1) with a classic left hook. Broussard beat the count, but was dropped twice more in rapid fashion, which invoked the automatic three-knockdown rule.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN REPORTER | June 12, 2008
BOSTON -- Orioles pitching coach Rick Kranitz is attributing Daniel Cabrera's struggles the past two outings to problems with his delivery, which has affected the movement on his two-seam fastball. In his past two outings, Cabrera has allowed 12 earned runs and 15 hits spanning 11 innings, squandering three-run leads in each outing. After allowing six earned runs to the Boston Red Sox in the series opener Tuesday, Cabrera said he's having problems getting his two-seam fastball down in the zone.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1999
After winding up the NFL draft without picking a running back, the Ravens plan to begin filling that void today by signing veteran Steve Broussard to a one-year contract.Broussard, a nine-year veteran who played the past four seasons in Seattle, agreed to terms and was expected to be in Baltimore to take a physical by last night.The Ravens envision Broussard, 5 feet 7, 201 pounds, as a player who can assume dual roles as a third-down back and kickoff returner. While his offensive role has been reduced in recent years, Broussard, 32, remains a force as a return man. He ranked fourth in the NFL with a 26.9-yard kickoff return average on 29 returns last year.
SPORTS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1999
Steve Broussard is battling Eric Metcalf, who is almost a mirror image of himself, for one of the Ravens' final running back spots.Both veterans are known for their outstanding special teams play, with Broussard averaging 26.9 yards on kickoff returns for the Seattle Seahawks last season. His average was second in the league behind Ravens safety Corey Harris (27.6), and he returned his first kickoff for a touchdown.Metcalf and Broussard are both smaller, older and versatile backs. It is doubtful the Ravens, who have Priest Holmes, Errict Rhett and Jay Graham ahead of both men on the depth chart, will keep both Metcalf and Broussard.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 26, 2004
Just as the conversation warms up, Marc Broussard fades out. He's calling from his cell phone, sitting on a bus en route to a gig in Trenton, N.J. Each time he calls back, the pop-rock singer sounds like a Verizon wireless commercial: "Can you hear me now? Good. What I was saying ..." Broussard, who plays Recher Theatre tomorrow night, is one of the freshest talents on the scene right now -- a singer-songwriter-musician whose sound is an impressive, heady mix of Bruce Springsteen's rock energy, Stevie Wonder's elastic phrasing and a dollop of Otis Redding's Southern grit.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | October 1, 2005
The state spent more than $6,000 to fly a Louisiana parish president to Baltimore this week so he could attend a baseball game with Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and meet with the head of the Maryland National Guard. Jefferson Parish President Aaron Broussard and three aides arrived Tuesday night and were immediately taken from the airport to Oriole Park at Camden Yards, where Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. was being honored. Ehrlich aides had planned for Broussard to go to the mound with Ehrlich to throw out the ceremonial first pitch, but his flight was delayed.
SPORTS
August 10, 2004
Who's hot The Rockies, who have the third-worst record in the NL, are 3-1 since trading star outfielder Larry Walker to the Cardinals. Who's not Red Sox pitchers have allowed 11 homers the past two games. Line of the day Ben Broussard, Indians 1B AB R H RBI HR 5 2 3 4 1
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | January 27, 2006
Aaron F. Broussard, the president of a Louisiana parish where hundreds of Marylanders helped in the days after Katrina, got a warm welcome from Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. yesterday and the unusual honor of a speaking slot in the middle of his State of the State address. But the veteran politician from the suburbs of New Orleans appears in danger of wearing out his welcome at home in Jefferson Parish. In the past few months, he has been heaped with blame for his decision to evacuate pump operators during the storm and criticized for exaggerating in an appearance on NBC's Meet the Press.
NEWS
January 26, 2008
On Wednesday, January 23, 2008, ANNA M. (nee Falise), 98, of Woodbine, formerly of Randallstown; beloved wife of the late Carl C. Repetti; devoted mother of John R. and wife Angela Repetti, Rosemary and husband Melvin Broussard, Carl F. and wife Diane Repetti; loving grandmother of Carl Glenn and Michael Broussard, Christina Hedge, Jon Paul, Nicholas and Anna Repetti. Also survived by eight great-grandchildren. The family will receive friends on Saturday, 6 to 9 P.M. and Sunday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. at Burrier-Queen Funeral Home and Crematory, P.A., 1212 W. Old Liberty Road, Winfield, 21784.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | January 27, 2006
Aaron F. Broussard, the president of a Louisiana parish where hundreds of Marylanders helped in the days after Katrina, got a warm welcome from Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. yesterday and the unusual honor of a speaking slot in the middle of his State of the State address. But the veteran politician from the suburbs of New Orleans appears in danger of wearing out his welcome at home in Jefferson Parish. In the past few months, he has been heaped with blame for his decision to evacuate pump operators during the storm and criticized for exaggerating in an appearance on NBC's Meet the Press.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | October 1, 2005
The state spent more than $6,000 to fly a Louisiana parish president to Baltimore this week so he could attend a baseball game with Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and meet with the head of the Maryland National Guard. Jefferson Parish President Aaron Broussard and three aides arrived Tuesday night and were immediately taken from the airport to Oriole Park at Camden Yards, where Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. was being honored. Ehrlich aides had planned for Broussard to go to the mound with Ehrlich to throw out the ceremonial first pitch, but his flight was delayed.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2005
With hundreds of doctors and nurses staffing health centers for Hurricane Katrina victims just south of New Orleans, Maryland has become "a guardian angel," Jefferson Parish President Aaron Broussard said yesterday. Broussard has been an outspoken critic of federal relief efforts - he suggested on NBC's Meet the Press last week that "whoever is at the top of this totem pole, that totem pole needs to be chain-sawed off" - but he had considerably nicer things to say about Maryland's contribution to his parish's recovery.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2005
CLEVELAND - Orioles reliever Steve Kline was halfway to the first base line last night before the ball landed. He glanced back, as if to punish himself, never doubting where it was headed. He couldn't stand to look. He couldn't resist. Ben Broussard, who began the game on the bench, hit a Kline slider into the seats in right field leading off the 10th inning, giving the Cleveland Indians a 5-4 victory at Jacobs Field and adding misery to the left-hander's tortured season. Kline (2-4) threw three pitches to the only batter he faced.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2005
With hundreds of doctors and nurses staffing health centers for Hurricane Katrina victims just south of New Orleans, Maryland has become "a guardian angel," Jefferson Parish President Aaron Broussard said yesterday. Broussard has been an outspoken critic of federal relief efforts - he suggested on NBC's Meet the Press last week that "whoever is at the top of this totem pole, that totem pole needs to be chain-sawed off" - but he had considerably nicer things to say about Maryland's contribution to his parish's recovery.
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