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Brothers Grimm

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By Dave Rosenthal | December 20, 2012
Today's Google Doodle honors Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, the German brothers who sought out folk tales and published them in collections that included many of our most popular "fairy tales. " You won't find many fairies in the stories -- but plenty of big, bad wolves and evil step-sisters . The brothers, who were trained as lawyers, published hundreds of folk tales in Kinder- und Hausmärchen ( Children's and Household Tales ) and Deutsche Sagen , a collection of German legends, in the early 19th Century, according to a biography compiled by the University of Pittsburgh.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
For most people, the attractions of Christmas do not include the possibility of children roasting over an open fire. But that has not kept Engelbert Humperdinck's "Hansel and Gretel" from becoming a favorite opera at Christmastide. Based on a vivid tale by the Brothers Grimm and first performed Dec. 23, 1893, Humperdinck's most famous opera does, of course, feature lots of talk and images of sweets, notably gingerbread. So it's easy to make a seasonal tie-in, which is what Washington National Opera did over the weekend with a revival of its 2007 family-friendly production.
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By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 16, 1998
Anne Arundel Community College's Moonlight Troupers will present the classic fairy tale "Hansel and Gretel," with a few twists, this weekend and next.The company, which produces a children's play every other spring to coincide with an AACC course in children's theater, is using William Glennon's adaptation of the Brothers Grimm story of a witch and the two children who outsmart her.This version has no wicked stepmother. The children's real mother is put under a spell by the witch. A bird and a gnome -- puppets of nearly human size -- are unwilling henchmen of the witch, leading the children to the gingerbread house.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | December 20, 2012
Today's Google Doodle honors Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, the German brothers who sought out folk tales and published them in collections that included many of our most popular "fairy tales. " You won't find many fairies in the stories -- but plenty of big, bad wolves and evil step-sisters . The brothers, who were trained as lawyers, published hundreds of folk tales in Kinder- und Hausmärchen ( Children's and Household Tales ) and Deutsche Sagen , a collection of German legends, in the early 19th Century, according to a biography compiled by the University of Pittsburgh.
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By Lori Moody and Lori Moody,Los Angeles Daily News | August 1, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Once upon a time, there was a girl named Snow White, two brothers named Grimm and a guy named Walt Disney.Snow was having a bit of trouble with her evil stepmother. The Brothers Grimm picked up on the story. Disney turned it into a Technicolor wonder of animation.Fifty-six years later, the re-release of Disney's popular film "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" invites comparisons to the Grimms' 19th-century version of the tale.Disney did not stray too far from the Grimms' rendition, according to one expert.
NEWS
February 23, 1997
Mary Lillian Wills, 82, who won an Academy Award in 1962 for her costumes in "The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm," died Feb. 13 in Sedona, Ariz. She designed costumes for more than 50 major films.Robert Herman, 82, a physicist who began his career by predicting radiation echoes from the origin of the cosmos and later developed a field called traffic sciences in which statistics can be used to predict traffic jams, died of lung cancer Feb. 13 in Austin, Texas.Archer Winsten, 92, who spent half a century writing movie reviews for the New York Post -- but only, he insisted, because he found the job a pleasant enough alternative to actual work -- died Friday in Moreau, N.Y.Pub Date: 2/23/97
NEWS
By Dave Rosenthal | March 30, 2012
This week's featured adaptation is "Mirror, Mirror," the humorous retelling of the Grimm fairy tale about Snow White and the jealous Queen, and reviews are encouraging. Of course, it won't have a chance of beating the debut of "The Hunger Games," which brought in more than $150 million in its opening weekend. But it looks like an entertaining treatment, and the cast has some star power with Julia Roberts and Nathan Lane. Here are excerpts from "Mirror, Mirror" reviews.
FEATURES
September 23, 2005
Will this weekend remain heavenly for Reese Witherspoon? Or will Flightplan, a thriller starring Jodie Foster, or Tim Burton's boy-meets-ghoul Corpse Bride be the weekend's draw? Witherspoon's romantic comedy Just Like Heaven, co-starring Mark Ruffalo, had a divine opening weekend, taking in $16.4 million to top The Exorcism of Emily Rose, in second place with $14.9 million. Shown are the past weekend's top-grossing films at North American theaters. Rk (lw)Title (Studio)......Weekend..
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
For most people, the attractions of Christmas do not include the possibility of children roasting over an open fire. But that has not kept Engelbert Humperdinck's "Hansel and Gretel" from becoming a favorite opera at Christmastide. Based on a vivid tale by the Brothers Grimm and first performed Dec. 23, 1893, Humperdinck's most famous opera does, of course, feature lots of talk and images of sweets, notably gingerbread. So it's easy to make a seasonal tie-in, which is what Washington National Opera did over the weekend with a revival of its 2007 family-friendly production.
FEATURES
September 30, 2005
LOS ANGELES -- It's shaping up as a busy weekend as Oliver Twist, Serenity, The Greatest Game Ever Played, Proof and A History of Violence vie for movie-goers' attention. But will any of them be able to outdraw Jodie Foster's thriller Flightplan? Here are the top 20 movies at U.S. and Canadian theaters last Friday through Sunday, followed by distribution studio, gross, number of theater locations, average receipts per location, total gross and number of weeks in release, as compiled by Exhibitor Relations Co. Inc.: .....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2012
The witch had been weeping in the boxwoods for more than half a century before Laura Amy Schlitz picked up her pen and set her free. The 57-year-old Schlitz is the librarian at Park School and a Newbery Medal-winning author whose newest novel, "Splendors and Glooms," will be published Tuesday by Candlewick Press. But in 1959, she was a small child in the throes of a nightmare. "This book is a deeply personal story, and it goes back a very long way," she says. "When I was 4 years old, I woke up in the middle of the night and told my parents there was a witch crying outside in the boxwood bushes.
NEWS
By Dave Rosenthal | March 30, 2012
This week's featured adaptation is "Mirror, Mirror," the humorous retelling of the Grimm fairy tale about Snow White and the jealous Queen, and reviews are encouraging. Of course, it won't have a chance of beating the debut of "The Hunger Games," which brought in more than $150 million in its opening weekend. But it looks like an entertaining treatment, and the cast has some star power with Julia Roberts and Nathan Lane. Here are excerpts from "Mirror, Mirror" reviews.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2011
When is hard candy more than just something to eat? Perhaps when you make it from 15 pounds of raw materials, stir in blue and green food coloring, add miniature "waves" as the mass hardens, and let the giant aquatic-looking entity surround the tiny lighthouse you've already crafted from other edible objects. "The Thomas Point Lighthouse," the scenic-but-sugary creation of Don and Marlena Dillenbeck of Hanover, is a contender this year in a gingerbread house competition sponsored by the Historic Annapolis Foundation, a contest in which creativity, technical skill and awareness of local history are as important as ingredients to a recipe.
FEATURES
September 30, 2005
LOS ANGELES -- It's shaping up as a busy weekend as Oliver Twist, Serenity, The Greatest Game Ever Played, Proof and A History of Violence vie for movie-goers' attention. But will any of them be able to outdraw Jodie Foster's thriller Flightplan? Here are the top 20 movies at U.S. and Canadian theaters last Friday through Sunday, followed by distribution studio, gross, number of theater locations, average receipts per location, total gross and number of weeks in release, as compiled by Exhibitor Relations Co. Inc.: .....
FEATURES
September 23, 2005
Will this weekend remain heavenly for Reese Witherspoon? Or will Flightplan, a thriller starring Jodie Foster, or Tim Burton's boy-meets-ghoul Corpse Bride be the weekend's draw? Witherspoon's romantic comedy Just Like Heaven, co-starring Mark Ruffalo, had a divine opening weekend, taking in $16.4 million to top The Exorcism of Emily Rose, in second place with $14.9 million. Shown are the past weekend's top-grossing films at North American theaters. Rk (lw)Title (Studio)......Weekend..
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 26, 2005
The Brothers Grimm is Terry Gilliam without the hook. Like every film he's directed, it's visually fascinating and stylistically distinctive. But unlike Brazil, The Adventures of Baron Munchausen, 12 Monkeys and even a noble failure like Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Grimm comes with no built-in reward for watching it. It's not that the film is without the requisite innovative visuals, and Gilliam remains a conjurer of worlds heretofore unseen....
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2011
When is hard candy more than just something to eat? Perhaps when you make it from 15 pounds of raw materials, stir in blue and green food coloring, add miniature "waves" as the mass hardens, and let the giant aquatic-looking entity surround the tiny lighthouse you've already crafted from other edible objects. "The Thomas Point Lighthouse," the scenic-but-sugary creation of Don and Marlena Dillenbeck of Hanover, is a contender this year in a gingerbread house competition sponsored by the Historic Annapolis Foundation, a contest in which creativity, technical skill and awareness of local history are as important as ingredients to a recipe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2012
The witch had been weeping in the boxwoods for more than half a century before Laura Amy Schlitz picked up her pen and set her free. The 57-year-old Schlitz is the librarian at Park School and a Newbery Medal-winning author whose newest novel, "Splendors and Glooms," will be published Tuesday by Candlewick Press. But in 1959, she was a small child in the throes of a nightmare. "This book is a deeply personal story, and it goes back a very long way," she says. "When I was 4 years old, I woke up in the middle of the night and told my parents there was a witch crying outside in the boxwood bushes.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 16, 1998
Anne Arundel Community College's Moonlight Troupers will present the classic fairy tale "Hansel and Gretel," with a few twists, this weekend and next.The company, which produces a children's play every other spring to coincide with an AACC course in children's theater, is using William Glennon's adaptation of the Brothers Grimm story of a witch and the two children who outsmart her.This version has no wicked stepmother. The children's real mother is put under a spell by the witch. A bird and a gnome -- puppets of nearly human size -- are unwilling henchmen of the witch, leading the children to the gingerbread house.
NEWS
February 23, 1997
Mary Lillian Wills, 82, who won an Academy Award in 1962 for her costumes in "The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm," died Feb. 13 in Sedona, Ariz. She designed costumes for more than 50 major films.Robert Herman, 82, a physicist who began his career by predicting radiation echoes from the origin of the cosmos and later developed a field called traffic sciences in which statistics can be used to predict traffic jams, died of lung cancer Feb. 13 in Austin, Texas.Archer Winsten, 92, who spent half a century writing movie reviews for the New York Post -- but only, he insisted, because he found the job a pleasant enough alternative to actual work -- died Friday in Moreau, N.Y.Pub Date: 2/23/97
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