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By GARRISON KEILLOR | March 5, 2009
My brother Philip died in Wisconsin on Friday while I was in Rome, and after I got my ticket changed to fly back for the memorial service, I went into a church off the Piazza Navona and lit candles for his aching family and stood in the piazza beside a fine fountain, with lots of splashing and nudity, the Fountain of the Four Rivers, which made me think of the Mississippi, where he and I used to skate in winter, and once, when the wind was whistling down...
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By Karen Nitkin, Special To The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2011
The Fourth of July is more than fireworks and picnics. It's a celebration of the day the Continental Congress took the bold step of declaring independence, vowing to "dissolve the political bands" connecting England and the colonies in order to start an entirely new government. Here in Maryland, we're close to where it all began. Philadelphia has turned the holiday into an 11-day party with historic touches. In Virginia, the presidential homes Monticello and Mount Vernon are both holding naturalization ceremonies that "hammer home the true meaning of the holiday," said Tamra Talmadge-Anderson, spokesperson for the Virginia Tourism Corporation.
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TRAVEL
By [MATTHEW VENSEL] | June 24, 2007
It's easy to be patriotic and celebrate our nation's birthday at "Sunoco Welcome America!," a weeklong Independence Day celebration in the City of Brotherly Love. The festival takes place Thursday-July 4 on the streets of downtown Philadelphia. Featured will be concerts, games, food, salsa lessons, a carnival and fireworks. The festivities end the night of the Fourth with a parade, more fireworks and a performance by Hall & Oates. "Sunoco Welcome America!" runs noon-11 p.m. each day at various locations in downtown Philadelphia.
TRAVEL
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2010
Flugtag. It's a funny-sounding word for a quirky event that is expected to take over the City of Brotherly Love this Saturday. Red Bull Flugtag, a competition where teams make human-powered flying machines and pilot them off a 30-foot-high deck into the water below, has attracted spectators in 35 cities worldwide since its 1991 beginning in Vienna, Austria. Past contraptions have been fashioned to resemble flying tacos and Winnebagos with wings. The longest "flight" this year has been 207 feet, but the originality is definitely there.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | September 16, 1995
Wasn't it election day already this week? Sure, but viewers can vote again tonight on a matter of public exposure at the "Miss America Pageant" on NBC. The peacock network also offers a pair of previews of new Sunday sitcoms.* "Great Railway Journeys II: Derry to Kerry" (7 p.m.-8 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- Host Michael Palin, former "Monty Python" trouper, proved to be TV's most amiable travel companion in his previous shows, "Around the World in 80 Days" and "Pole to Pole." Here he takes a train trip around Ireland, in search of his family roots.
NEWS
June 6, 1995
EuthanasiaIn their article voicing opposition against active euthanasia by the medical profession, Drs. Karen Korzick and Peter Terry use two arguments to support their conclusion.The first involves the deontological principle that killing is always a wrong-making element of behavior.The second argument appeals to the "slippery-slope" concern that any law allowing active euthanasia would fail to protect the autonomous choices of vulnerable groups of patients.The validity of both of these arguments, however, has been disputed by other philosophers and physicians.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 4, 2004
The Best Man is a drama about two presidential candidates. One is a man of intelligence and moral scruples; the other is a snap-decision maker who tries to be a man of the people. Throw in a few references to philandering (in one case) and homosexuality (in the other), and Gore Vidal's play sounds brand new. But in fact, this prescient political drama debuted in 1960. Yet despite having been revived on Broadway in time for the 2000 presidential election, The Best Man does date itself in at least one respect: It's set at a national political convention at a time when the outcome of such events was actually up in the air. Still, Vidal's trenchant commentary on the fine line between the personal and the public in politics is probably even more pertinent nowadays.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 7, 2005
The 50th-anniversary restored print of the Japanese film Godzilla, premiering in Baltimore tomorrow, is strong enough to overcome Gen-X memories of the jokey 1998 American remake, which starred a computer-generated megalizard, and haunting enough to clear baby-boomers' minds of the dubbed and cut American-release version that filled Yankee TV schedules in the 1950s and '60s. Director Inoshiro Honda's 1954 original has genuine pulp magic: Time has not diminished its tabloid docu-horror allure.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2004
PHILADELPHIA - Mike Jarvis knows a little about what Rick Carlisle and the Indiana Pacers are going through these days with Ron Artest. Long before Artest first came to the NBA as a member of the Chicago Bulls, long before the talented but behaviorally challenged forward became a poster child for the league's plethora of players who seem to be out of touch with reality, Jarvis saw the makings of the public relations nightmare that unfolded this week....
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | November 3, 1991
Of the thousands of hours Laurie DeYoung has spent on the air at country radio station WPOC-FM, one brief segment sums up as well as anything what she is about, both behind and away from the microphone.It occurred one day last month, as she signed off at the end of her 5:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. shift, prefacing the last number she would play that morning with a simple observation. "I think of my boys every time I play this song," she said. Whereupon the soft strains of the Keith Whitley/Earl Thomas Conley duet, "Brotherly Love," filled the air:They share the same last name and the same color eyesBut they fight like tigers over one red bikeLooking at them reminds me of usThey're gonna fight and they're gonna fussBut they've got something special -- brotherly loveThere could be no doubting the sincerity of the words of the song -- or those of the woman who introduced it. Indeed, in the six years Ms. DeYoung has hosted WPOC's morning show -- first with the now long gone and all but forgotten Rocky Marlowe, and the last four by herself -- she has displayed more wholesomeness and vitality than a milk commercial.
NEWS
By GARRISON KEILLOR | March 5, 2009
My brother Philip died in Wisconsin on Friday while I was in Rome, and after I got my ticket changed to fly back for the memorial service, I went into a church off the Piazza Navona and lit candles for his aching family and stood in the piazza beside a fine fountain, with lots of splashing and nudity, the Fountain of the Four Rivers, which made me think of the Mississippi, where he and I used to skate in winter, and once, when the wind was whistling down...
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | March 21, 2008
In sports, often we're OK with buying in to stereotypes. I don't mean nasty, black-hearted stereotypes that pigeonhole whole ethnic groups, but rather those wide-world-of-fun-and-games stereotypes. You know what I'm talking about. Duke basketball. Alex Rodriguez. The Oakland Raiders. Steadfastly clinging to a narrow perspective about players and teams keeps sports familiar to us, which means comfortable. And sometimes, we're reluctant to give up certain strong beliefs because to do otherwise would require us to admit we might have been wrong.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | March 20, 2008
Sen. Barack Obama is a magician. He could tell me it's raining on a sunny day, and I'd grab an umbrella. He could tell me the moon is the sun, and I'd reach for my shades. He could even tell me that the Rev. Jeremiah Wright's rants god-damning America and blaming AIDS on a white-man conspiracy were wrong but essentially justified by a racist past - and I'd have to slap myself before I saddled up a polka-dotted horse and galloped down the Yellow Brick Road. Mr. Obama's speech Tuesday from Philadelphia - the city of brotherly love - was eloquent and inspiring, and will be read in schools for generations.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN REPORTER | February 5, 2008
Quarterback Eli Manning made a lot of people look silly Sunday night as he led the New York Giants to an improbable Super Bowl victory. But not members of the New England Patriots. It was, instead, us. We looked silly. All of us. Manning and the Giants won a Super Bowl in an era that, for better or worse, cannot resist the lure of instant analysis. We need to know - right now! - whether someone is going to be a bust or whether he is destined for Canton, Ohio. Whether he deserves to be run out of town or dipped in bronze.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | October 10, 2007
Acity known for a bell that's broken and a delicacy that's Cheez Whiz-ed wants to up its cultural clout - by stealing Edgar Allan Poe from Baltimore. "We're Taking Poe Back," read the headline in Philadelphia's City Paper last week. Arguing that Philly's claim on Poe is greater than Baltimore's, the article urges Philadelphians to "reclaim our macabre, prodigal son" in time for the 2009 bicentennial of Poe's birth. "This is a literary grave robbing," reporter Edward Pettit began. "I want to exhume his body and translate his remains to the City of Brotherly Love.
TRAVEL
By [MATTHEW VENSEL] | June 24, 2007
It's easy to be patriotic and celebrate our nation's birthday at "Sunoco Welcome America!," a weeklong Independence Day celebration in the City of Brotherly Love. The festival takes place Thursday-July 4 on the streets of downtown Philadelphia. Featured will be concerts, games, food, salsa lessons, a carnival and fireworks. The festivities end the night of the Fourth with a parade, more fireworks and a performance by Hall & Oates. "Sunoco Welcome America!" runs noon-11 p.m. each day at various locations in downtown Philadelphia.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | March 20, 2008
Sen. Barack Obama is a magician. He could tell me it's raining on a sunny day, and I'd grab an umbrella. He could tell me the moon is the sun, and I'd reach for my shades. He could even tell me that the Rev. Jeremiah Wright's rants god-damning America and blaming AIDS on a white-man conspiracy were wrong but essentially justified by a racist past - and I'd have to slap myself before I saddled up a polka-dotted horse and galloped down the Yellow Brick Road. Mr. Obama's speech Tuesday from Philadelphia - the city of brotherly love - was eloquent and inspiring, and will be read in schools for generations.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Sun Staff Writer | December 23, 1994
The Kusick twins were only in the fifth grade at High Point Elementary School at the time, but Tim Haynie could tell a couple of wrestlers when he saw them.Even though they had on boxing gloves.Mike and Marty Kusick were pummeling each other in their backyard while their parents were staging an anniversary party inside that was attended by Haynie, coach of the Buccaneers Athletics recreation program in Pasadena."He asked us to join the team," Marty said.The Kusicks took it from there. Today, as they plunge into their senior season at Northeast, Mike and Marty are seeking their third straight Class 1A-2A state championships.
NEWS
By Rich Scherr and Rich Scherr,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 2007
On the lacrosse field, brothers Travis and Ben Love each have played starring roles this spring for unbeaten Winters Mill, helping the Falcons to their first county and outright conference titles. It's in their own backyard, however, where the goalie and attackman have waged some of their fiercest battles. The Loves, two of six lacrosse-playing siblings -- ranging from 20-year-old sister and former All-County player Lindsay to 5-year-old stick-wielding brother Gabriel -- have spent countless hours honing their skills by shooting on each other behind their Westminster home.
SPORTS
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,Sun Reporter | October 7, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- The venomous contempt that Philadelphia Eagles fans have for Dallas Cowboys wide receiver Terrell Owens is the type of animosity often reserved for the most vile and hurtful of sins: betrayal. When a local sports talk show offered free tickets to tomorrow's game here to the fan who could be most creative if he had the chance to confront Owens, the vitriol was unbridled. "Maggot," "scumbag" and "malignant tumor" were just a few of the more printable epithets. "If Owens and [Eagles quarterback]
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