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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2003
Brooks Brothers, the venerable menswear company whose conservative English-styled tailored suits, rep ties and button-down shirts have been an essential sartorial component for generations of presidents, preppies, tycoons, artists, film and stage stars, is celebrating its 185th birthday this year. For the occasion, Brooks has published a lavishly illustrated company history. Appropriately, the cover of Generations of Style: It's All About the Clothing, by John William Cooke, is gray three-quarter-inch-wide pinstripe fabric.
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NEWS
September 11, 2014
Ray Rice broke the 11th commandment which states, "Thou shalt not assault the female gender" ( "Ray Rice video: This is what domestic violence looks like," Sept. 8). Any adult male worth his salt knows that and unfailingly abides by it. Then there's "The Enabler," NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell. Don't let the Brooks Brothers and smartly starched shirts fool you. He still has some of his tentacles wrapped around the web of the good ol' boy network. The NFL's history of downplaying anything remotely close to domestic violence has to be terminated, and Commissioner Goodell must go. As for Mr. Rice, the dark clouds have reappeared and do not seem to be going away any time soon.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | February 19, 1998
Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc., the last men's tailored clothing retailer in the country to produce its own apparel, said yesterday that it will sell its remaining manufacturing operation to an upstate New York garment maker.Bank has agreed to sell its sewing plant on West North Avenue and a cutting room on Brookhill Road in Northwest Baltimore to a subsidiary of M. S. Pietrafesa LP, the 76-year-old manufacturer of Polo by Ralph Lauren tailored clothing, Brooks Brothers suits and private label collections for Nordstrom.
BUSINESS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
The Federal Trade Commission ruled Friday that the Men's Wearhouse takeover of fellow clothing retailer Jos. A. Bank Clothiers can move forward after the agency found that the combined company would not violate antitrust laws. "Despite limited competition from the Internet, the transaction is not likely to harm consumers because of significant competition from other sources," the commission wrote in a blog post about the decision. "There are numerous competitors that sell suits across the range of prices of the suits the merging parties offer, including Macy's, Kohl's, JC Penney's, Nordstrom, and Brooks Brothers, among others.
FEATURES
By VIDA ROBERTS and VIDA ROBERTS,SUN FASHION EDITOR | November 5, 1995
A shot of French cuff is the way to dress up a suit or an evening blouse. The links to join the cuff may be of minimalist design or major flash. Best of all, clean and classic links can be his, hers or shared.SHOPPING GUIDEON THE CUFFPage 50Clockwise from top center: Etched sterling cuff links, $300, by Betty Cooke at the Store Ltd. Gold and silver disk, $175, by Betty Cooke at the Store Ltd. Shirt, $60, at Brooks Brothers. Semiprecious stones set in sterling, $48.50, at Amaryllis. Vintage 1940 carved ivory cuff link, $275, at Heirloom Jewels.
NEWS
By George Will | December 28, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Yes, yes, we have been told. Philosophers tell us that change is life's only constant. Poets tell us that the center cannot hold, and all that is beautiful drifts away like the waters. Scientists say even the continents are adrift.But Brooks Brothers, the clothier founded in Manhattan in 1818, was supposed to be the still point of the turning world. For generations it has defined conservatism in men's dress -- blue and gray natural shoulder suits, blue and white oxford cloth shirts with button-down collars, striped ties.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | August 25, 1999
The Fed had to raise interest. Too many of us have jobs.Lawrence Bell spent $4,323 from campaign contributions in New York on clothes for himself and the establishment is scandalized that he went to Saks Fifth Avenue, not J. Press or Brooks Brothers.When Gov. Ventura refereed a pro wrestling bout, he demeaned 1. politics, 2. rassling, 3. Minnesota, 4. himself or 5. none of those. Choose one.Save water. Use dry ice.
FEATURES
By New York Times News ServiceLos Angeles Daily NewsEdited by Catherine Cook | January 9, 1992
Armani goes shoppingGiorgio Armani, whose A/X shop has been attracting crowds in SoHo, stopped off to do a little shopping of his own last week -- at Brooks Brothers, according to store executives.The Italian designer, who recently revived the American sack suit popularized by Brooks, dropped about $2,300 in two visits to the Brooks Brothers store on Madison Avenue. He stocked up on shirts, braces and ties, proving that designers sometimes choose to buy something other than their own merchandise.
NEWS
September 11, 2014
Ray Rice broke the 11th commandment which states, "Thou shalt not assault the female gender" ( "Ray Rice video: This is what domestic violence looks like," Sept. 8). Any adult male worth his salt knows that and unfailingly abides by it. Then there's "The Enabler," NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell. Don't let the Brooks Brothers and smartly starched shirts fool you. He still has some of his tentacles wrapped around the web of the good ol' boy network. The NFL's history of downplaying anything remotely close to domestic violence has to be terminated, and Commissioner Goodell must go. As for Mr. Rice, the dark clouds have reappeared and do not seem to be going away any time soon.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | August 5, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- For Secret Service men, the seamstresses at English American Tailoring Co. will add hidden pockets for carrying weapons. For professional wrestlers, they'll cut extra wide patterns to fit monstrous shoulders. And for celebrities and U.S. presidents, they'll take special care when making buttonholes or hemming slacks.Workers at the Cranberry Road plant are seamstresses for the stars, and business is looking up.Overall sales increased 20 percent this year compared with last year, and pants sales increased 70 percent, Chief Executive Officer Mark J. Falcone said in an interview Monday.
TRAVEL
By John-John Williams IV and The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2013
Going to the beach doesn't simply mean getting a killer tan. There's also plenty of great fashion and home décor finds along the way. Here's a guide to places to shop while visiting the shore. Ron Jon Surf Shop The iconic retailer, now based in Florida but originally launched in New Jersey, is opening its first Maryland location in Ocean City this month. The shop is known for its surf-centric inventory, ranging from boards and wetsuits to swimsuits and casual beachwear, outwear and even jewelry.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd and The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
Let's face it: there's ugly and then there's ugly. But the retro unis the Pittsburgh Steelers wore Sunday while beating the Washington Redskins 27-12 elevated ugliness to a new height, or plunged it to a new depth, whichever way you want to go. Garish yellow jerseys with black stripes and black numbers in a white box? They looked like giant bumblebees straight out of San Quentin. The tan pants were an equally hideous touch. It was as if the uniform designer thought: "What's  the worst possible color to match with yellow and horizontal black stripes?
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2011
We've arrived, I think. The Baltimore area has long been used by Washington politicians seeking outside-the-Beltway backdrops and beating well-worn paths to the GM plant in White Marsh or Jimmy's in Fells Point. But now, Baltimore itself has been cast in something of a role reversal — playing Washington. That's right: Baltimore has become Washington's body double. Just as Julia Louis-Dreyfus wrapped up filming the HBO pilot and political satire "Veep" in these parts, another HBO crew is headed here to film "Game Change," based on the wonderfully dishy book of the same name about the 2008 presidential campaign.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2009
Raphael Langford has always been known as one of the most elegant figures on Baltimore's social scene. Even getting sidelined by a serious illness last year didn't knock the 64-year-old Mount Vernon resident off his "classic" style track, as evidenced by his air of sleek sophistication at a recent party at Baltimore's Ritz-Carlton. The semiretired chief operating officer of Unibec Inc. says he learned years ago, while working for fashion designer Halston, the importance of always looking good.
NEWS
By Tom Hamburger and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Tom Hamburger and Walter F. Roche Jr.,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 21, 2006
WASHINGTON -- President Bush signed into law yesterday the last major piece of legislation approved by the outgoing Congress - including a $100 million-a-year boost in the Medicare reimbursement rates for dialysis providers who proved to be heavy-spending lobbyists and generous contributors to important legislators, notably House Ways and Means Chairman Bill Thomas of California. The dialysis providers were among many special interests benefiting from a piece of legislation that was designed to simply extend existing tax cuts and credits but ended up as a bill freighted with billions of dollars in new spending earmarks for everyone from the coal industry to Brooks Brothers.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2003
Brooks Brothers, the venerable menswear company whose conservative English-styled tailored suits, rep ties and button-down shirts have been an essential sartorial component for generations of presidents, preppies, tycoons, artists, film and stage stars, is celebrating its 185th birthday this year. For the occasion, Brooks has published a lavishly illustrated company history. Appropriately, the cover of Generations of Style: It's All About the Clothing, by John William Cooke, is gray three-quarter-inch-wide pinstripe fabric.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | April 1, 1993
Lynne Agress grew up in Princeton, N.J., shops at Talbots and works with accountants. The only style for her: "businesswoman's preppie."As the president of her own Towson-based company, BWB-Business Writing At Its Best Inc., Ms. Agress, 50, feels dressing professionally is part of her job. Plus, it feels most natural to her.How would you describe your wardrobe?Conservative with a bit of a flair. In the days when I taught $H college, I had more clothes. Now that I'm in business for myself, I buy fewer but more costly pieces -- mostly suits and two-piece dresses.
FEATURES
By Lois Fenton | November 8, 1990
Q: I've noticed guys in my office wearing cuffs on their pants. The tailor says I'm too short for them. Is he right? If not, how wide should they be?A: It is nonsense that cuffs make a man appear shorter. True, an eye-catching belt cutting across one's middle visually affects how tall he appears; but a horizontal line so close to the ground does not affect the eye one way or another. What is true: Cuffs make any outfit appear to be better-tailored. Plain bottoms -- especially on suits -- seem to have less finesse.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | February 23, 2003
IT WAS a great story while it lasted, but the quasi-Edwardian get-up known as the men's business suit has not made a big comeback. Workers are not rejecting Dockers for Brooks Brothers out of shame for the lax excesses of the 1990s or any other reason. There is no known correlation between casual Fridays and casual balance sheets. The first Enron guy to plead guilty, Michael Kopper, wore Armani. Sales of "tailored menswear" fell by 1 percent last year, says New York researcher NPD Group.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | February 3, 2002
"When I was growing up," says Baltimore-based architect Rolf Haarstad, "my main impetus in life was to be a man who takes a shower before work instead of afterward." Meaning a professional who has less dirt under his fingernails than on the bottom of his shoes, and a suit or two hanging in his closet. He's made it, and if you ask his wife, fellow architect Kathleen Lechleiter, she might say markedly so. His closet is twice the size of hers, and he has plans to add onto their Towson house, turning 8-year-old daughter Elsa's current bedroom into a big closet (don't worry, she gets a new room)
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