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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 17, 1999
NEW YORK -- The painting of a black Madonna, whose elephant dung and pornographic touches have incurred the wrath of Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani and stirred a religious, cultural and political furor in the city, was attacked at the Brooklyn Museum of Art yesterday by a man who smeared paint on it but did no permanent damage, the authorities said.After feigning illness to lull a security guard, the man, identified as Dennis Heiner, 72, of Manhattan, darted behind a clear plastic shield, took out a bottle and squeezed white paint in a broad stroke across the face and body of the Madonna, witnesses said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
N. Jay Jaffee might not be among the best known American photographers of the 20th century, but a sizable and engrossing exhibit of his works at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, makes it obvious that he deserves much wider recognition. Jaffee captured the world around him - mostly New York - in vibrant black and white. He had an eye for subtle detail, which enabled him to burrow beneath the surface and give many of his images multilayered textures. The exhibit in the spacious Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery contains nearly 80 examples.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,STAFF WRITER | October 10, 1999
A poorly conceived art exhibition? Grandstanding by politicians? An ugly misunderstanding about the nature of art and the role of museums?These are some of the questions now surrounding "Sensation: Young British Artists from the Saatchi Collection," an exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum of Art. Before the show opened last weekend, New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani declared it "sick stuff" and threatened to cut city funding to the Brooklyn Museum of Art if...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2012
It's entirely possible that one of the august and influential guest curators for "Public Property," the summer exhibit opening Sunday at the Walters Art Museum , was none other than your plumber. Ditto for your postal carrier and your daughter's softball coach. "Public Property" consists of 106 items — paintings, sculptures, manuscripts and jewelry — adhering to the theme of "creatures" and taken from the Walters' holdings. What makes the exhibit unique in Baltimore history is that the show's title, themes and artworks were chosen by more than 53,000 votes cast online and by museum visitors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff | November 7, 1999
Like universities, symphony orchestras and theaters, art museums depend upon donors to help defray the costs of running their institutions, whether they're paying the heat bills or presenting an exhibition. But which donors are considered acceptable? What do they want in return? When does quid pro quo become far too much?Questions like these suddenly are in the spotlight, thrust there by the flap over the financing of "Sensation," the controversial exhibition of British art on display at the Brooklyn Museum of Art. But most museum professionals -- while differing on many aspects of the debate -- agree that the questions raised by the Brooklyn affair are ever-present in the world of nonprofit cultural institutions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | March 4, 2001
In a media-saturated world, there's no such thing as bad publicity. So New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani's latest eruption against the Brooklyn Museum of Art, whose current show, "Committed to the Image: Contemporary Black Photographers," includes a picture of the Last Supper that the mayor calls "offensive," predictably has only caused people to flock to the spectacle. It's predictable because the uproar over Renee Cox's "Yo Mama's Last Supper," in which the artist depicts herself as a nude Jesus surrounded by 12 black disciples, is virtually a reprise of the furor over the Brooklyn Museum's "Sensation" exhibit two years ago. In that episode, Giuliani took umbrage at young British painter Chris Ofili's black Virgin Mary mounted on clumps of elephant dung and tried to cut off the museum's funding.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 31, 1999
NEW YORK -- Far more than has been previously disclosed, the "Sensation" exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum of Art has been financed by companies and individuals with a direct commercial interest in the works of the young British artists in the show, according to court documents and interviews with people involved in the exhibition.Faced with rising costs and the unwillingness of major corporations to support the show -- whose works have provoked furious protests in London and more recently in New York -- Arnold L. Lehman, the museum's director, embarked last summer on an aggressive campaign to finance "Sensation" by other means.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1999
Be careful what you wish for.Museum director Arnold Lehman sought to create buzz and draw attention to the Brooklyn Museum of Art by importing from England a controversial exhibition that included human blood, animal parts and a painting of the Virgin Mary splattered with elephant dung.He surely has done so. But he also has incensed New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani, who on Wednesday threatened to cut off all financial support to the museum unless the exhibition, scheduled to open next week, is canceled.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff | August 8, 1999
BROOKLYN, N.Y. -- Deep within the Brooklyn Museum of Art, the chief conservator and his assistants are breeding maggots. A few floors away, museum employees are constructing enormous glass tanks to hold thousands of gallons of formaldehyde, a shark and a sawed-in-half pig. One wing over, the public relations department is gearing up to send out advertisements printed on violent yellow backgrounds:"Health Warning," the ads will say. "The contents of this...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | October 8, 2000
On a recent visit to the Brooklyn Museum of Art's new show "Hip-Hop Nation: Roots, Rhymes & Rage," I missed my subway stop and inadvertently ended up in the place where hip-hop was born. It was an honest mistake. Lulled by misplaced faith in the directions offered by a token-booth clerk, I clung to my strap as the train sped right past Brooklyn's leafy Prospect Park, where the museum is located, and clattered on into the vast, impoverished urban wilderness known as East New York. When I finally emerged, I was in a trash-strewn wasteland of dilapidated houses and sullen storefronts so unremittingly bleak, and so geographically and psychically remote from Manhattan's sophisticated glitter, as to seem almost on another planet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | September 8, 2005
`The Case for Museum Doors' What role should museums play in the community? Dr. Arnold Lehman, director of the Brooklyn Museum and former head of the Baltimore Museum of Art, addresses this and other neighborhood outreach-related topics from an art perspective in a lecture at the Walters Art Museum. Titled "The Case for Museum Doors: Half Open or Half Closed - Community, Diversity and the American Art Museum," the seminar honors Renee May, a Walters docent who was killed in the Sept. 11 attacks.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN ARTS WRITER | March 1, 2002
There's not a shovel in sight. No picks, no tape measures. No carefully dug trenches with scientists intently peering at the earth. But at the Walters Art Museum, an excavation of sorts is under way. Like an archaeologist on a dig in rarely visited territory, Regine Schulz is combing the exhibition cases at the Walters and exploring its storage vaults. She's examining hundreds of Egyptian antiquities, from 3-inch bronzes to large stone reliefs. She's gently uncovering them and eyeing them closely.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | July 10, 2001
Ellen D. Reeder, a former curator at the Walters Art Museum, has been named director of the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington. Reeder, who was curator of ancient art at the Walters from 1984 to 1999, will assume her new post Monday. Until recently, she was deputy director for art at the Brooklyn Museum of Art in New York, where she was responsible for collections, curatorial activities, exhibits, education, conservation and reference libraries. "I consider it an honor and privilege to serve as director of the National Museum of Women in the Arts, and look forward to bringing the work of this exceptional museum to an even larger national and international audience," Reeder said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | March 4, 2001
In a media-saturated world, there's no such thing as bad publicity. So New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani's latest eruption against the Brooklyn Museum of Art, whose current show, "Committed to the Image: Contemporary Black Photographers," includes a picture of the Last Supper that the mayor calls "offensive," predictably has only caused people to flock to the spectacle. It's predictable because the uproar over Renee Cox's "Yo Mama's Last Supper," in which the artist depicts herself as a nude Jesus surrounded by 12 black disciples, is virtually a reprise of the furor over the Brooklyn Museum's "Sensation" exhibit two years ago. In that episode, Giuliani took umbrage at young British painter Chris Ofili's black Virgin Mary mounted on clumps of elephant dung and tried to cut off the museum's funding.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | October 8, 2000
On a recent visit to the Brooklyn Museum of Art's new show "Hip-Hop Nation: Roots, Rhymes & Rage," I missed my subway stop and inadvertently ended up in the place where hip-hop was born. It was an honest mistake. Lulled by misplaced faith in the directions offered by a token-booth clerk, I clung to my strap as the train sped right past Brooklyn's leafy Prospect Park, where the museum is located, and clattered on into the vast, impoverished urban wilderness known as East New York. When I finally emerged, I was in a trash-strewn wasteland of dilapidated houses and sullen storefronts so unremittingly bleak, and so geographically and psychically remote from Manhattan's sophisticated glitter, as to seem almost on another planet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By HOLLY SELBY and HOLLY SELBY,SUN ARTS WRITER | May 21, 2000
The scene was a panel discussion at last week's annual conference of the American Association of Museums in Baltimore. The topic was ethics, specifically the ethics of exhibiting artworks owned by private collectors. The panel was to discuss the findings of a task force charged with drawing up guidelines to help museums work toward "transparency" -- in other words, making the behind-the-scenes negotiations of exhibition financing more open to the public. The irony was that no one, at least no one involved with the task force, wanted to talk about the subject in any but the vaguest generalities.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1999
NEW YORK -- The Catholics handed out vomit bags. The civil rights activists lighted candles. A yellow poster blared, "SENSATION SENSATION." By midmorning yesterday, the sidewalks in front of the Brooklyn Museum of Art were clogged with demonstrators, and a line of people waiting to see the art that was causing the commotion stretched through the museum's lobby, out the door and across the cobblestone plaza.It was the official opening of an exhibition of contemporary British art that has enraged New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani and triggered lawsuits by the city and the museum in the past two weeks.
NEWS
October 5, 1999
THE CULTURAL war over the Brooklyn Museum of Art's show of shock art will do good if it brings new audiences to the majestic Egyptian antiquities and important American paintings gracing that wonderful museum.The controversy over the young British artists' work will do harm if the Brooklyn Museum wins its battle at a cost to public funding of itself and other arts institutions.The show was a success in London and Berlin. Arnold L. Lehman, director of the Brooklyn Museum of Art, reasonably supposed that New York could handle it. Not so.The dispute is a replay of the uproar a decade ago where National Endowment of the Arts support of two exhibitions nearly destroyed the NEA and reduced its funding by Congress.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 17, 1999
NEW YORK -- The painting of a black Madonna, whose elephant dung and pornographic touches have incurred the wrath of Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani and stirred a religious, cultural and political furor in the city, was attacked at the Brooklyn Museum of Art yesterday by a man who smeared paint on it but did no permanent damage, the authorities said.After feigning illness to lull a security guard, the man, identified as Dennis Heiner, 72, of Manhattan, darted behind a clear plastic shield, took out a bottle and squeezed white paint in a broad stroke across the face and body of the Madonna, witnesses said.
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