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NEWS
May 14, 1993
"DEM Bums" long ago left Flatbush for the fertile fiscal fields of sunny Southern California. But the memory of Brooklyn's much-cherished Brooklyn Dodgers lingers on.You could hear the loyal fans cheering recently when a federal judge ruled that the O'Malley family's baseball team had "abandoned" the blue-collar borough when it moved to Brooklyn in 1957.Thus, the name "Brooklyn Dodgers" stays in New York City.The judge declared the Brooklyn Dodgers "a non-transportable cultural institution separate from the 'Los Angeles Dodgers' or the 'Dodgers' who play in Los Angeles."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 8, 2007
On July 12, 1941, The New Yorker magazine ran the first of a two-part profile on Larry MacPhail, then president of the Brooklyn Dodgers major league baseball team. Leland Stanford "Larry" MacPhail was a renowned baseball club owner and executive of the Cincinnati Reds, the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Yankees. He led all three clubs out of the doldrums to great success. MacPhail is credited with many innovations to the sport, including night games, season tickets and radio broadcasts of games.
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NEWS
July 8, 2007
On July 12, 1941, The New Yorker magazine ran the first of a two-part profile on Larry MacPhail, then president of the Brooklyn Dodgers major league baseball team. Leland Stanford "Larry" MacPhail was a renowned baseball club owner and executive of the Cincinnati Reds, the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Yankees. He led all three clubs out of the doldrums to great success. MacPhail is credited with many innovations to the sport, including night games, season tickets and radio broadcasts of games.
SPORTS
By Sam Borden and Sam Borden,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2000
On a summer day in 1951, a young Keith Harmeyer hung over the railing at Municipal Stadium while the Orioles warmed up for their International League game against Montreal. The 7-year old was watching his Northwood neighbor, Howie Moss, toss the ball around, when Moss noticed him and asked the Royal he was playing catch with to toss Harmeyer a ball. That man was Tommy Lasorda, and 49years later Harmeyer has finally gotten his prized catch signed. Harmeyer was just one of the at least 100 spectators at Oak Crest Village yesterday, listening to the man who bleeds Los Angeles Dodger blue.
NEWS
December 28, 1992
When Gordon "Babe" Phelps died a few weeks back at age 84, Anne Arundel County lost one of its all-time athletic greats. A life-long Odenton resident, Mr. Phelps experienced some of the glory days -- if not-so-well compensated days -- of baseball.He was a local legend as the top hitter for the Odenton Athletic Club (which played in the Southwestern Industrial League and the Baltimore Major League).His big break came in 1930, when the owner of the Washington Senators saw Mr. Phelps play against the Bowie Athletic Club and decided that he had the potential to play in the professional major leagues.
NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,Contributing Writer | February 11, 1994
Baseball player Jackie Robinson had more challenges to stare down than a wicked curveball or the pitfalls of becoming a free agent.As the first African-American to play major league baseball, Robinson faced hostility and abuse from players, fans and the press.His despair and triumph are chronicled in "Most Valuable Player," a 60-minute drama geared to upper-elementary and middle-school youngsters.The show will be presented by Toby's Youth Theatre at selected times through March 2 at Toby's Dinner Theatre in Columbia.
SPORTS
By Sam Borden and Sam Borden,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2000
On a summer day in 1951, a young Keith Harmeyer hung over the railing at Municipal Stadium while the Orioles warmed up for their International League game against Montreal. The 7-year old was watching his Northwood neighbor, Howie Moss, toss the ball around, when Moss noticed him and asked the Royal he was playing catch with to toss Harmeyer a ball. That man was Tommy Lasorda, and 49years later Harmeyer has finally gotten his prized catch signed. Harmeyer was just one of the at least 100 spectators at Oak Crest Village yesterday, listening to the man who bleeds Los Angeles Dodger blue.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | April 11, 1997
You would think that the Masters, probably golf's most important tournament, would carry enough tradition and heft so as not to get swallowed whole by any one player, but then Tiger Woods is not just any player.Woods, who played the Augusta National course last year as a precocious 20-year-old amateur, returns this year as a seasoned 21-year-old professional, and he's all anyone can talk about going into this weekend's final rounds.CBS analyst Peter Kostis is impressed at how Woods' game has matured, particularly in his approaches to the green.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | November 14, 1995
He was our worst enemy. Now, he's our best friend.CPaul Tagliabue hasn't changed. It's just that his lack of vision as TC NFL commissioner suddenly is working to Baltimore's advantage.Think Pete Rozelle would have rolled over like this? No chance.Rozelle would have fought the Browns' move to Baltimore. Actually, he never would have even faced the problem, because he would have put an expansion team in Baltimore in the first place.A strong commissioner addresses issues like this before they reach the crisis stage.
SPORTS
By PAT O'MALLEY | December 11, 1992
Sunday afternoons at Granddad's playing baseball may neve be the same, but the family of Ernest Gordon "Babe" Phelps need only look out in his Odenton back yard and close their eyes.It shall always be their field of dreams.For all of his 84 years, Babe, who died yesterday morning with Mabel, his wife of 62 years, at his bedside, lived in Odenton. He lost a yearlong bout with cancer."Our fondest memories will be playing baseball in Granddad's backyard every Sunday after church," said Craig Engler.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1997
Doris Kearns Goodwin went home recently, but it wasn't there.Old neighbors, some in their 90s, had gathered from afar to meet her. Schoolmates and childhood friends arrived bearing dusty yearbooks. But her childhood haunts were gone -- either boarded up or under new ownership."Everybody was gone from the block," Goodwin says of the one block of Southard Avenue in Rockville Centre, N.Y., that was her entire universe as a child. "As you go forward in your life, things are lost behind you. That whole part of my life was gone."
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | April 11, 1997
You would think that the Masters, probably golf's most important tournament, would carry enough tradition and heft so as not to get swallowed whole by any one player, but then Tiger Woods is not just any player.Woods, who played the Augusta National course last year as a precocious 20-year-old amateur, returns this year as a seasoned 21-year-old professional, and he's all anyone can talk about going into this weekend's final rounds.CBS analyst Peter Kostis is impressed at how Woods' game has matured, particularly in his approaches to the green.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | April 6, 1997
Banquets are being held, documentaries produced and baseball is commemorating that it was 50 years ago when the major leagues allowed a black player to enter what had been a protected, "white only" domain. Yes, Jackie Robinson is being brought back to life with written and oral testimonials.But no matter how descriptive the recall, there's no possible way to profoundly and accurately portray what it was like for him to have experienced the role of a pioneer, going it alone and being subjected to a painful ugliness that brought out only the worst in other men. They wanted him to fail and expressed the cruelest of insults in an attempt at out-of-control intimidation.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1996
One of the more pointless remakes in recent movie history airs on Fox tonight. Of course, it's still more interesting than watching the Democrats in Chicago."
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | November 14, 1995
He was our worst enemy. Now, he's our best friend.CPaul Tagliabue hasn't changed. It's just that his lack of vision as TC NFL commissioner suddenly is working to Baltimore's advantage.Think Pete Rozelle would have rolled over like this? No chance.Rozelle would have fought the Browns' move to Baltimore. Actually, he never would have even faced the problem, because he would have put an expansion team in Baltimore in the first place.A strong commissioner addresses issues like this before they reach the crisis stage.
NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,Contributing Writer | February 11, 1994
Baseball player Jackie Robinson had more challenges to stare down than a wicked curveball or the pitfalls of becoming a free agent.As the first African-American to play major league baseball, Robinson faced hostility and abuse from players, fans and the press.His despair and triumph are chronicled in "Most Valuable Player," a 60-minute drama geared to upper-elementary and middle-school youngsters.The show will be presented by Toby's Youth Theatre at selected times through March 2 at Toby's Dinner Theatre in Columbia.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1997
Doris Kearns Goodwin went home recently, but it wasn't there.Old neighbors, some in their 90s, had gathered from afar to meet her. Schoolmates and childhood friends arrived bearing dusty yearbooks. But her childhood haunts were gone -- either boarded up or under new ownership."Everybody was gone from the block," Goodwin says of the one block of Southard Avenue in Rockville Centre, N.Y., that was her entire universe as a child. "As you go forward in your life, things are lost behind you. That whole part of my life was gone."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1996
One of the more pointless remakes in recent movie history airs on Fox tonight. Of course, it's still more interesting than watching the Democrats in Chicago."
NEWS
May 14, 1993
"DEM Bums" long ago left Flatbush for the fertile fiscal fields of sunny Southern California. But the memory of Brooklyn's much-cherished Brooklyn Dodgers lingers on.You could hear the loyal fans cheering recently when a federal judge ruled that the O'Malley family's baseball team had "abandoned" the blue-collar borough when it moved to Brooklyn in 1957.Thus, the name "Brooklyn Dodgers" stays in New York City.The judge declared the Brooklyn Dodgers "a non-transportable cultural institution separate from the 'Los Angeles Dodgers' or the 'Dodgers' who play in Los Angeles."
NEWS
December 28, 1992
When Gordon "Babe" Phelps died a few weeks back at age 84, Anne Arundel County lost one of its all-time athletic greats. A life-long Odenton resident, Mr. Phelps experienced some of the glory days -- if not-so-well compensated days -- of baseball.He was a local legend as the top hitter for the Odenton Athletic Club (which played in the Southwestern Industrial League and the Baltimore Major League).His big break came in 1930, when the owner of the Washington Senators saw Mr. Phelps play against the Bowie Athletic Club and decided that he had the potential to play in the professional major leagues.
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