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By Steve McKerrow | October 25, 1991
Ho-hum. Once again Media Monitor readers seem unimpressed with the new fall television season, judging from a relatively light response to our annual request for early favorite shows.But one new program did generate a stir of enthusiasm: the CBS series "Brooklyn Bridge," a sweetly believable period piece from producer Gary David Goldberg ("Family Ties") about a multi-generational Jewish family in 1950s Brooklyn. Marion Ross ("Happy Days") is surprisingly persuasive as the grandmother and Danny Gerard is excellent as the central character kid (as good, in fact, as Fred Savage in "The Wonder Years")
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By Katie Mercado, For The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2013
This past weekend my mom and I went to New York for my first dress fitting at Kleinfeld Bridal (which was amazing!) and then spent the day doing touristy things. In the afternoon we walked the Brooklyn Bridge, which I would recommend as a definite must-do. While on the Brooklyn side we were admiring the carousel right on the water and all of the people below when we noticed people lining up with gold balloon letters. Once they were all organized we saw “Will you marry us?” spelled out in the balloons!
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FEATURES
By Michael Hill | August 6, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Walk onto a stage at Paramount Studios, past all the scaffolding and lights and the spread of food for the extras' breakfast, and suddenly the year is 1956, the place is Brooklyn and the kitchen floor is ugly linoleum.It's the wonderfully wrought set of "Brooklyn Bridge," one of the most promising entries in the new fall television sweepstakes. Though production has just begun on the CBS half hour, from the looks of the script of the initial episode, this should be a funny, poignant trip to bountiful nostalgia every Friday night at 8:30.
TRAVEL
September 13, 2009
I live in Baltimore and on a recent visit to the Big Apple, my grandson, Kynan, 12, convinced me to walk across the Brooklyn Bridge. We started our journey in Manhattan (City Hall subway stop) and it took us about 30 minutes to complete it. This picture is taken from the bridge looking toward the East River and with the East side of Manhattan in the background. On the Brooklyn side, we walked along the promenade. That area is steeped in Revolutionary War history. It's where troops from the fabled "Maryland Line" won high praise from General George Washington for their courage in resisting the British forces.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 2, 1994
NEW YORK -- A gunman in a car opened fire on a van carrying more than a dozen Hasidic students as it began to cross the Brooklyn Bridge from Manhattan yesterday morning, critically wounding two young men and injuring two others, police said.The gunman, driving a blue Chevrolet Caprice and apparently using two guns, pursued the van full of terrified students across the bridge. He fired in three separate bursts, police said, spraying both sides of the van with fire from a 9-millimeter weapons.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 20, 1991
"Brooklyn Bridge" is "The Wonder Years" for the 1950s. It's sweet, sad, nostalgic and hopeful. It's a coming-of-age novel for the age of television. It's a winner.Instead of middle-class suburbia, "Brooklyn Bridge," premiering at 8 tonight on WBAL-TV (Channel 11), takes place in an all-Jewish apartment building in Brooklyn. In place of the Arnolds -- a nuclear family of mother, father and kids -- we have the Bergers and the Silvers -- an extended family of grandpa, grandma, mother, father and kids.
NEWS
By Christina Bittner and Christina Bittner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 16, 2001
BROOKLYN PARK'S own Brooklyn Bridge Christian Coffeehouse recently celebrated its second anniversary as a place where everyone - black and white, young and old, city and county residents - can come together. In 1999, the Rev. Russ Tenhoff, a Brooklyn native, felt the need to return to his former neighborhood to start a coffeehouse ministry. After learning that Church on the Rock had bought a former nightclub located behind the church's property on Church Street, he spoke with the church's pastor, the Rev. John Krach, and received permission to use the building.
NEWS
By Diane Cardwell and Diane Cardwell,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 19, 2002
NEW YORK - If the enthusiasm of Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg is any indication, tourists and residents may soon be able to scale the majestic heights of the Brooklyn Bridge - but for a fee. "The Brooklyn Bridge is history, there's a great view and it would be exciting," Bloomberg said of a proposal by an Australian company to lead explorers up the bridge, just as it does with a bridge in Sydney. "I think it would be a wonderful thing to try - why not?" Down under, intrepid tourists outfitted in special suits that harness them to a static line can climb to the top of Sydney Harbor Bridge for about $125, according to a spokeswoman for NYC & Co., the city's tourist board.
NEWS
By NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | December 31, 1997
NEW YORK -- The Brooklyn Bridge is going high-tech.Officials are testing a de-icing system there that uses electric sprinklers to spray antifreeze chemicals on the span's roadbed when it freezes.The system, installed on part of the bridge in August, is the first of its kind in the city.Transportation officials are touting it as a way to save the 115-year-old bridge from the corrosive rock salt that they use now, while allowing them to deal more quickly with icy bridge conditions."The biggest thing that destroys our bridges is not the traffic, it's the salt," said outgoing city Transportation Commissioner Christopher Lynn.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 20, 2003
WASHINGTON - Federal law enforcement officials said yesterday that they had uncovered a plot by al-Qaida operatives, using an Ohio truck driver as a scout, to destroy the Brooklyn Bridge and other targets as recently as March. The truck driver, a 34-year-old naturalized American citizen from Kashmir named Iyman Faris, was secretly apprehended about three months ago and agreed to plead guilty in May in closed proceedings before a federal judge in Virginia to charges that he had provided material support to terrorists.
NEWS
By Mikael Elsila | September 11, 2006
Iwas an eyewitness to 9/11. I was living in Brooklyn and I commuted to work by walking across the Brooklyn Bridge. On my way to work, I heard a passerby say that the World Trade Center was on fire. I scrambled up to the bridge and saw flames coming out of one of the towers and thick, black smoke. I could also see what looked like a gaping hole. It was around 9:30 a.m. My mind couldn't grasp the fact that steel and glass were on fire. I started walking toward the flames. Meanwhile, hundreds of people were streaming at me in the opposite direction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Cryer | April 18, 2004
High Steel: The Daring Men Who Built the World's Greatest Skyline, by Jim Rasenberger. HarperCollins. 376 pages. $26.95. It's no sweat being a structural ironworker, right? All you have to be is very strong, very agile and utterly fearless. At any moment, the work can kill you. If you're lucky enough to make it into the union -- it helps if your father was a member -- and join a crew building a bridge or raising a skyscraper for $34 an hour, here's what might happen. You could step in the wrong spot and fall to the floor below.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 29, 2003
ALEXANDRIA, Va. - An Ohio truck driver was sentenced to 20 years in prison yesterday for providing support to al-Qaida and helping the terrorist network plot a second wave of attacks against the United States. U.S. District Judge Leonie Brinkema made the decision after rejecting an effort by the defendant, 34-year-old Iyman Faris, to withdraw a guilty plea he made earlier this year in an agreement with the government. Writing a book Faris, a U.S. citizen and independent truck driver in Columbus, Ohio, claimed that his confession and guilty plea were based on lies he told government investigators to ingratiate himself with the FBI because he wanted to write a book.
NEWS
By Alyson R. Klein and Alyson R. Klein,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2003
The bridges crossing Loch Raven Reservoir at Paper Mill Road are a study in contrasts -- one sleek and functional, the other, no longer used, so ornate that it looks like something out of a Grimm's fairy tale. Baltimore County officials have been trying to decide what to do with the latter bridge for the past three years. Now plans are being developed to make it accessible to hikers and bicyclists. "Around here, some people say it's almost as beautiful as the Brooklyn Bridge. ... It's in a beautiful part of the county, and it will give people a good place to go out to on a nice day, if only for a couple hours," said David Fidler, spokesman for the county Department of Public Works.
NEWS
By Paul Lieberman and Paul Lieberman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 22, 2003
NEW YORK - When the Brooklyn Bridge was approaching its 100th birthday in 1983, a committee of dignitaries spent years planning the celebration, then threw a party to remember, with fireworks seen for miles. That bridge remains such a beloved landmark that even its 120th birthday last month became an occasion for festivities, capped by a laser light show. "It's the bridge to the world," Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz said. Today's birthday party for one of the Brooklyn Bridge's neighbors up the East River, the Williamsburg Bridge, also known as "The Willy B," has more humble origins.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 20, 2003
WASHINGTON - Federal law enforcement officials said yesterday that they had uncovered a plot by al-Qaida operatives, using an Ohio truck driver as a scout, to destroy the Brooklyn Bridge and other targets as recently as March. The truck driver, a 34-year-old naturalized American citizen from Kashmir named Iyman Faris, was secretly apprehended about three months ago and agreed to plead guilty in May in closed proceedings before a federal judge in Virginia to charges that he had provided material support to terrorists.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 1997
BOSTON -- The old Subaru pier in South Boston can't take any more dirt, but still the trucks come. The train station is closed for the weekend. And a couple sharing the same bed in a State Street apartment have to yell to make their sweet nothings heard.What could cause all this? Think big.Boston has become one giant construction site for the largest, most ambitious public works project in America: the Central Artery/Third Harbor Tunnel Project. Locals call it "the Big Dig."The project is more expensive and larger than the Brooklyn Bridge or Hoover Dam, and involves three simultaneous phases of construction: Extending the Massachusetts Turnpike, building a new tunnel from downtown Boston to Logan International Airport, and burying the main north-south highway through the city -- known as the Central Artery -- under the mud on which Boston was built.
NEWS
By Paul Lieberman and Paul Lieberman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 22, 2003
NEW YORK - When the Brooklyn Bridge was approaching its 100th birthday in 1983, a committee of dignitaries spent years planning the celebration, then threw a party to remember, with fireworks seen for miles. That bridge remains such a beloved landmark that even its 120th birthday last month became an occasion for festivities, capped by a laser light show. "It's the bridge to the world," Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz said. Today's birthday party for one of the Brooklyn Bridge's neighbors up the East River, the Williamsburg Bridge, also known as "The Willy B," has more humble origins.
NEWS
By Christina Bittner and Christina Bittner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 14, 2002
FROM NOON to 5 p.m. Saturday, Brooklyn Park may not be dancing in the street, but it certainly will be dancing on the parking lot of the Arundel Village Shopping Center. That's when Brooklyn Bridge Christian Coffeehouse will sponsor an outdoor concert on its parking lot in the rear of the shopping center at 5524 Ritchie Highway. Brooklyn Bridge founder Russ Tenhoff said that he has worked to organize the concert for more than a year. "I wanted to do it in June, but [we] couldn't get all the bands together.
NEWS
By Diane Cardwell and Diane Cardwell,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 19, 2002
NEW YORK - If the enthusiasm of Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg is any indication, tourists and residents may soon be able to scale the majestic heights of the Brooklyn Bridge - but for a fee. "The Brooklyn Bridge is history, there's a great view and it would be exciting," Bloomberg said of a proposal by an Australian company to lead explorers up the bridge, just as it does with a bridge in Sydney. "I think it would be a wonderful thing to try - why not?" Down under, intrepid tourists outfitted in special suits that harness them to a static line can climb to the top of Sydney Harbor Bridge for about $125, according to a spokeswoman for NYC & Co., the city's tourist board.
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