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NEWS
October 27, 2004
A Brookeville man was killed early yesterday when he was struck by a car while running across Route 175 in Jessup, Anne Arundel County police said. About 5:15 a.m., Glenn Allan James, 20, was crossing the highway in a dimly lit area near the Baltimore-Washington Parkway overpass when he was hit by a Jeep Grand Cherokee driven by William J. Slifker Jr., 66, of Crofton, said police spokesman Sgt. Shawn Urbas. James suffered multiple fatal injuries and was pronounced dead at the scene, Urbas said.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | February 20, 2008
Marguerite D. Sargent, a homemaker who enjoyed flying and sailing, died Thursday of pneumonia at Montgomery General Hospital in Olney. The longtime Howard County resident was 88. Marguerite Dumeste Ridgely was born in Frederick and raised in Sunshine in Montgomery County. She was a 1937 graduate of Sherwood High School and after graduating from Strayer's Business College in Washington, worked as an office manager for the federal government and later for The Washington Post. After marrying Warren Gooch Sargent, an architect, in 1950, the couple built their home on Ridgely family property near Glenwood.
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NEWS
June 26, 1995
A Brookeville woman was killed after she failed to stop at a stop sign and her car was struck by a Mack truck and a van in the Lisbon area Thursday afternoon, Howard County police said.Kristie Ann Fooks, 19, of the 18000 block of Tanterra Way was pronounced dead at the scene, Howard traffic investigators said. A passenger in her 1992 Toyota, Stacy Jean Swaitek of Olney, was flown by a state police MedEvac helicopter to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center. She was discharged Saturday, the hospital said.
NEWS
October 7, 2006
Robert H. Belsinger, a retired Ellicott City businessman and World War II veteran, died of heart failure Monday at Howard County General Hospital. The Silver Spring resident was 80. Mr. Belsinger was born and raised in Baltimore, and graduated from City College in 1943. He enlisted in the Army Air Forces, trained as a tail gunner and served in the 8th Air Force in Ipswich, England. He was aboard a B-17 that was shot down over Germany in April 1945. He was captured and interned in a prisoner-of-war camp until being returned to the U.S. His decorations included the Air Medal with two oak leaf clusters.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1999
BROOKEVILLE -- Two weeks after he stood in the center of this tiny town and insisted he would never build a bypass of Route 97, Gov. Parris N. Glendening made a U-turn.In a letter yesterday to Montgomery County Council President Isiah Leggett, the governor promised to restore the 1 1/2-mile road to the planning process if the county meets four Smart Growth requirements.The offer -- quickly accepted by Leggett -- heads off a confrontation next week at the Board of Public Works between Glendening and the two other board members, state Comptroller William Donald Schaefer and state Treasurer Richard N. Dixon.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1999
BROOKEVILLE -- A combative Gov. Parris Glendening again drew a line through this town's proposed bypass yesterday, and then he drew a line in the dirt and challenged the road's supporters to cross it.Within hours, the battle for the bypass around this village in rural Montgomery County was joined once more.Glendening, surrounded by townspeople and elected officials, reiterated that the state will not pay for the $13 million road because it runs contrary to his anti-sprawl Smart Growth campaign.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 15, 1990
BROOKEVILLE -- If President James Madison could come back to life and ride again the 25 miles from Washington to this tiny Montgomery County hamlet, he'd recognize it, much of it anyway.But not for too much longer, according to residents, who say that unless state and county governments take decisive action soon, the ever-increasing traffic and development pressure will ruin an essentially intact, early-19th-century village.It was in Brookeville, a peaceful, thriving Quaker farming and mill town, that President Madison joined other refugees seeking shelter as the invading British army ravaged Washington in 1814, burning the White House and the Capitol in the War of 1812.
FEATURES
By Katherine Drew DeBoalt | May 16, 1993
In the records piled high on Mary Gardner's dining-room table live farmers, mill hands, housewives and freed slaves.They are past residents of the Montgomery County town of Brookeville, the people whose stories are told in these census reports and land records.To Ms. Gardner these records also represent the makings of an (( enormous guest list. This year, with the help of volunteers, she has set about the ambitious task of identifying everyone who has lived, worked or owned property in Brookeville.
NEWS
By PHOTOS BY DAVID HOBBY and PHOTOS BY DAVID HOBBY,SUN PHOTOGRAPHER | November 23, 2005
Sharp's at Waterford Farm in Brookeville offers a program on Pilgrim history for children. Visitors learn about how Pilgrims lived, what they ate and the kinds of games children played, as well as their relationship with American Indians.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | February 20, 2008
Marguerite D. Sargent, a homemaker who enjoyed flying and sailing, died Thursday of pneumonia at Montgomery General Hospital in Olney. The longtime Howard County resident was 88. Marguerite Dumeste Ridgely was born in Frederick and raised in Sunshine in Montgomery County. She was a 1937 graduate of Sherwood High School and after graduating from Strayer's Business College in Washington, worked as an office manager for the federal government and later for The Washington Post. After marrying Warren Gooch Sargent, an architect, in 1950, the couple built their home on Ridgely family property near Glenwood.
NEWS
By PHOTOS BY DAVID HOBBY and PHOTOS BY DAVID HOBBY,SUN PHOTOGRAPHER | November 23, 2005
Sharp's at Waterford Farm in Brookeville offers a program on Pilgrim history for children. Visitors learn about how Pilgrims lived, what they ate and the kinds of games children played, as well as their relationship with American Indians.
NEWS
October 27, 2004
A Brookeville man was killed early yesterday when he was struck by a car while running across Route 175 in Jessup, Anne Arundel County police said. About 5:15 a.m., Glenn Allan James, 20, was crossing the highway in a dimly lit area near the Baltimore-Washington Parkway overpass when he was hit by a Jeep Grand Cherokee driven by William J. Slifker Jr., 66, of Crofton, said police spokesman Sgt. Shawn Urbas. James suffered multiple fatal injuries and was pronounced dead at the scene, Urbas said.
NEWS
By William Rasmussen and William Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2003
When Les Unglesbee moved to the Montgomery County town of Brookeville in 1951, he loved to, as he puts it, "sit out on my front porch, prop up my feet and enjoy myself." Now, with 9,000 vehicles a day rumbling within 25 feet of his house, Unglesbee, 76, stays inside. In Hampstead, Charles Walter, who has lived in the Carroll County town since 1939, says he has nearly been run over by speeding tractor-trailers while trying to cross Main Street to get his mail. "You can almost tell the time by the traffic," Walter said, referring to the town's morning and evening rush hours.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2002
Howard County has finally started spending its millions intended for farmland preservation - two years after the money was made available and five years since the last agricultural parcel was saved in the county. The county settled with the owners of Waterford Farm yesterday in a preservation deal that takes in 400.5 acres of the 634-acre estate, one of the largest farms preserved in the county. Officials agreed to pay $6,180 an acre. With interest, which is tax free, the total will be $6.3 million.
NEWS
April 13, 1999
The WinnersBaltimoreA bit of political engineering now allows former congressman and NAACP President Kweisi Mfume to run for mayor of the city. His supporters persuaded the Assembly to cut the residency requirement for mayoral candidates from a year to six months.Business and utilitiesThey had their way in a complex deregulation bill, including the benefit of the doubt about whether -- and how much -- market competition will help Maryland consumers. Legislators admitted they didn't know whether consumers would be helped.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1999
BROOKEVILLE -- Two weeks after he stood in the center of this tiny town and insisted he would never build a bypass of Route 97, Gov. Parris N. Glendening made a U-turn.In a letter yesterday to Montgomery County Council President Isiah Leggett, the governor promised to restore the 1 1/2-mile road to the planning process if the county meets four Smart Growth requirements.The offer -- quickly accepted by Leggett -- heads off a confrontation next week at the Board of Public Works between Glendening and the two other board members, state Comptroller William Donald Schaefer and state Treasurer Richard N. Dixon.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1999
BROOKEVILLE -- A speck of a town in rural Montgomery County that knows a thing or two about war is spoiling for a fight with Gov. Parris N. Glendening over his highly publicized campaign against sprawl.And the residents of tiny Brookeville have found a powerful ally who some suspect is looking for a gubernatorial fight of his own: William Donald Schaefer.Brookeville became one of the first victims of Smart Growth policies last month when its long-planned $13 million bypass was cut from Glendening's fiscal 2000 capital budget.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | October 6, 1996
Decorating Brookeville FarmsBrookeville Farms was a working dairy farm at the turn of century. By the next turn of the century, it's slated to be a country inn and fine-dining restaurant. But through Oct. 20, Brookeville Farms is the Friends of Olney Theater decorator show house (19501 Georgia Ave., near Olney).More than 20 interior and landscape designers are participating. Hours are 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays. Tickets at the door are $12. Call (301)
NEWS
March 1, 1999
SMART GROWTH, the governor's plan to contain sprawl, correctly recognizes that Maryland cannot sustain its support for the new roads and schools required to accommodate all the growth spiraling from the nation's fourth-largest metropolitan area. But his first moves to implement Smart Growth have flopped.Gov. Parris N. Glendening looked like a political bully when he halted a logical plan to transform an old state hospital into a police training complex in Carroll County, whose leaders, incidentally, backed his opponent in the fall election.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1999
THOSE WHO WATCHED Gov. Parris N. Glendening talk to the voters of Brookeville on Friday were a bit stunned at the vehemence of his remarks.He had bad news about the Brookeville bypass in Montgomery County, and he didn't sugarcoat it. No bypass, he said. And no appeal.This seemed to violate a basic political principle: Bad news must come from a spokesman and not in person."That's what the telephone is for," one elected pol observed.The governor's press secretary, Ray Feldmann, said the governor did not go looking for a confrontation but didn't back away from one when it arose.
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