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Brook Trout

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NEWS
November 9, 1994
A few weeks ago, Marylanders were drawn to the plight of an endangered Florida manatee, which somehow had wandered into the Chesapeake Bay. After an exhausting and frustrating week, rescuers were able to save the creature from the chilly water, fly it back to Florida and release it in a wildlife refuge.A few days later, marine biologists celebrated the release of a loggerhead turtle, which had been given a new chance for life after undergoing unprecedented cataract surgery.The turtle was found floating off Virginia Beach a year ago, almost dead from starvation because it was unable to see its prey.
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SPORTS
By Mike King and The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Midway through winter, a chilly fog surrounded Theaux Le Gardeur's shop. Hardly anyone would be out on the Gunpowder River that day, he said. But he didn't need the river or sunlight. He stood behind his fly-fishing store clutching three rods: graphite, glass and bamboo. One by one, he tossed them back with his forearm and flicked them forward, eliciting the characteristic swish of fly line cutting through air. Each rod carried the line, bounced back quickly and delivered the fly far ahead of Le Gardeur, depositing the insect imitations onto the slick grass next to Backwater Angler.
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SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | August 27, 2006
My first brook trout arrived on a frosty late-spring morning in mountain water so cold it made my fingers tingle before going completely numb. No bigger than my hand, the brookie was a work of art to rival New Hampshire's Chocorua Lake, its home just before I enticed it to swallow my fly and to which I would return it moments later. Its olive skin peppered with blue-ringed red dots and a rakish orange belly is a vivid image that has stayed with me for more than 25 years. If I had a lick of artistic ability, I could draw that fish from memory.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 25, 2012
The message arrived last month with something like the urgency of a gold strike: Native brook trout, lots of them, discovered in the twin ditch creeks of an old farm in Hereford, in northern Baltimore County. Environmental scientists get pretty excited about this sort of thing. They found brown trout, too, and other smaller fish that a kid splashing around in summer might call minnows: sculpins, black-nosed dace and rosy-sided dace. Signs of life, to be sure, but more than that — signs of a delicate species' survival in a stream degraded for decades by the practices of men trying to earn a living off the land.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writer | December 14, 1993
State officials and environmentalists cheered yesterday when they found 10 brook trout in the Jabez Branch, survivors of about 300 wild fish relocated in recent years to the shallow Severn River tributary."
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writer | December 14, 1993
State officials and environmentalists cheered yesterday when they found 10 brook trout in the Jabez Branch, survivors of about 300 wild fish relocated in recent years to the shallow Severn River tributary."
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | November 9, 2008
Right now, there are worse things than being a Maryland brook trout, I suppose. A Republican strategist. A Ford salesman. A Detroit Lions fan. At some point, presumably, all of the humans will bounce back. But the clock is running down on the fate of Salvelinus fontinalis. Study after study show brook trout are in trouble through no fault of their own. Brookies love cold water, clear water and lots of little critters floating by to eat. But overdevelopment, loss of buffers and habitat, and climate change are proving to be the trifecta of doom.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1997
A construction project is under way along the wooded Jabez Branch near Gambrills. A backhoe snorts in the mud. Chain saws snarl. And the tanklike tracks of a bulldozer march along the banks.But the developers here aren't building houses for people. They're making a bedroom community for brook trout.At the site of the only remaining trout-breeding stream in Maryland south of Baltimore, Anne Arundel County and state workers are sinking tree roots into the water to act as fish shelters, repairing eroded stream banks and stopping the flow of hot and oily runoff from nearby highways.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1995
Jubilant biologists found a record number of brook trout yesterday in the Jabez Branch in Anne Arundel County, a sign of success in their efforts to bring back a fish population wiped out by road construction.Forty-nine of the fish had been born in the shallow meandering stream this year. Only 41 trout were found in 1986, before road work threatened the stream.The Jabez was the last natural brook trout stream in the Maryland coastal plain and the state's southernmost wild native trout creek until runoff from highway construction and new houses killed off the fish by 1990.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1995
Jubilant biologists found a record number of brook trout yesterday in Jabez Branch, a sign of success in their efforts to bring back a fish population wiped out by road construction.Forty-nine of the fish had been born in the shallow, meandering stream this year. Only 41 trout were found in 1986, before roadwork threatened the stream.The Jabez was the last natural brook trout stream in the Maryland coastal plain and the state's southernmost wild native trout creek until runoff from highway construction and new houses killed off the fish by 1990.
SPORTS
September 18, 2010
We generally don't do this. Something about the old warning, "If you do it once, you've got to do it for everyone. " But sometimes a letter comes in and it hits home. This one, from Michael Marlow, did just that. It needs no embellishment. It speaks for itself. I'd like to make it hard for anyone — that's you, punks — to get any pleasure out of stolen gains. And I'm hoping you, readers, will email the rightful owner, Michael Marlow (mfsmarlow@yahoo.com), or call the Baltimore City Watershed Rangers (410-396-9863)
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | November 9, 2008
Right now, there are worse things than being a Maryland brook trout, I suppose. A Republican strategist. A Ford salesman. A Detroit Lions fan. At some point, presumably, all of the humans will bounce back. But the clock is running down on the fate of Salvelinus fontinalis. Study after study show brook trout are in trouble through no fault of their own. Brookies love cold water, clear water and lots of little critters floating by to eat. But overdevelopment, loss of buffers and habitat, and climate change are proving to be the trifecta of doom.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | August 27, 2006
My first brook trout arrived on a frosty late-spring morning in mountain water so cold it made my fingers tingle before going completely numb. No bigger than my hand, the brookie was a work of art to rival New Hampshire's Chocorua Lake, its home just before I enticed it to swallow my fly and to which I would return it moments later. Its olive skin peppered with blue-ringed red dots and a rakish orange belly is a vivid image that has stayed with me for more than 25 years. If I had a lick of artistic ability, I could draw that fish from memory.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2004
If you look up while walking to the edge of the Upper Gunpowder River, you might see a sign warning fishers that they can't use bait. No night crawlers, no cans of worms and absolutely none of that glittery power bait. The fish in these waters can be legally snagged only if they're tricked into thinking that the balled up feather and wool at the end of a hook -- also known as a fly -- would make a good meal. Fortunately for anglers, fish are hungry this time of year. With this in mind, we took a day to hunt for trout with Theaux Le Gardeur, owner of Backwater Anglers, a fly-fishing shop in Monkton, close to the river.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2001
The Maryland Court of Special Appeals has ruled that a lawsuit centering on the fate of the last natural brook trout stream in Green Spring Valley can proceed. The decision overturns a ruling two years ago by a Baltimore County Circuit Court judge, who threw out the suit because the wives of the two plaintiffs wouldn't join it. Harold H. Burns Jr. and Scott Fine of Lutherville filed the lawsuit in July 1999. It accuses Scottish Development Co., MacKenzie Commercial Real Estate, Westwicke Homeowners Association and the owners of 30 lots in the Westwicke development of cutting down too many trees and clearing too much land, causing storm water runoff that pollutes Dipping Pond Run. Burns and Fine argued that the actions violated legal agreements reached when Baltimore County zoning officials approved the Westwicke development.
NEWS
By ASCRIBE NEWS | November 12, 2000
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va -- Preliminary findings from a survey conducted in April of 452 Virginia brook trout streams indicate some recovery from the acidification levels found in a 1987 baseline survey. The results will require further analysis because they may be strongly influenced by differences in stream flows at different times -- the sampling in April 1987 took place under much wetter conditions than sampling in April 2000. Also, long-term monitoring during the 12-year period indicates acidification is continuing for most Virginia brook trout streams.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1999
Mike Fiorita, a 17-year-old from Falling Waters, W. Va., set a Maryland record for brook trout with a 6-pound, 1.75-ounce catch on the North Branch of the Potomac River last month.The previous state mark of 4 pounds, 12 ounces was set by Rick Joyce at Western Run on May 30, 1985.Fiorita's fish, taken from the put-and-take area at Barnum on April 10, was 22.5 inches long and 15 inches in circumference.Fisheries service biologists believe the monster brook trout moved downstream to the Barnum area after beefing up outside the trout rearing pens below Jennings Randolph Dam."
SPORTS
By Mike King and The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Midway through winter, a chilly fog surrounded Theaux Le Gardeur's shop. Hardly anyone would be out on the Gunpowder River that day, he said. But he didn't need the river or sunlight. He stood behind his fly-fishing store clutching three rods: graphite, glass and bamboo. One by one, he tossed them back with his forearm and flicked them forward, eliciting the characteristic swish of fly line cutting through air. Each rod carried the line, bounced back quickly and delivered the fly far ahead of Le Gardeur, depositing the insect imitations onto the slick grass next to Backwater Angler.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | October 20, 2000
ARECENT moonlit morning, before the lights had come on in most houses, I drove along a stretch of country road that ain't what it used to be. There was a time, maybe 20 years ago, when there was nothing but pasture on either side of the road, and the only buildings you'd see in the moonlight were barns and a single old house on a farm that's not much of a farm anymore. Now there are sprawling ranchers with sprawling lawns dotted with pines planted by the new homeowners. The farmers are mostly gone.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | July 19, 1999
Scott Fine and his wife sleep with their bedroom window open each night, listening to the stream behind their Green Spring Valley home. They enjoy the sound so much they keep their window open during the winter and crank up the heat. But Fine said Dipping Pond Run -- the last stream in the Jones Falls watershed that supports a naturally reproducing brook trout population -- is jeopardized by work on a nearby housing development. "The stream was pristine when I first got here, and now there's nothing but mud in the middle," Fine said of the stream, east of Falls Road and north of Maryvale Preparatory School.
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