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By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 20, 1998
BRYANT WOODS resident Nancy Berla spent several years during the 1980s writing about parental involvement in schools.When she retired a few years ago, she decided to put her ideas into practice by volunteering at her grandchildren's school, Running Brook Elementary.The school's administrators consider her such as asset that they nominated her for a Daily Points of Light Award, a national honor that recognizes outstanding volunteers.L Berla was featured on the Points of Light Web site April 30.Students and staff honored her at a ceremony at the school last month.
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NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | July 29, 2007
After four weeks of summer school at Running Brook Elementary, nearby residents were used to the steady flow of students at the newly renovated facility. But the sight of two fully grown cattle outside the school's front entrance Friday was a surprise. The two steers - Michael and Angelo - were at the school as part of a challenge issued by Assistant Principals Troy Todd and Brian Vanisko. Todd, who oversaw the 46 students from Running Brook Elementary, and Vanisko, who oversaw the 71 students from nearby Stevens Forest Elementary, joined forces to encourage their students to keep up their attendance at the Running Brook summer school program.
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NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 23, 1998
CHILDREN AT Running Brook Elementary School are getting one-on-one help with reading and math, thanks to a group of about 20 volunteers organized by the Columbia Association's Columbia Volunteer Corps.Part of the association's WeCare Team, the volunteers began working at the school about three weeks ago.Their efforts are being coordinated by volunteers Linda Lazaroff of Hobbit's Glen and Lillian Shapiro of Wilde Lake."It's great to have this enthusiasm," said Jason McCoy, Running Brook's assistant principal.
NEWS
By Dana Klosner-Wehner and Dana Klosner-Wehner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 10, 2004
RUNNING BROOK Elementary School and local leaders recognized Vivian C. "Millie" Bailey last month by dedicating a bench in her honor. Known as the school's "guardian angel," Bailey, 86, has no children of her own. But she has been raising funds for Running Brook for about seven years, filling teachers' wish lists with everything from crayons, backpacks and snacks for the after-school and Saturday club to computer software, headphones, and musical instruments,...
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 10, 1997
Assistant Principal Marion Miller says she is "looking forward to continuing the traditions" of Running Brook Elementary School when she becomes principal next month.Jason McCoy, a teacher at Guilford Elementary School, will become the assistant principal.Both appointments take effect Jan. 20.Earlier in the year, the Board of Education announced that Principal, Deborah Drown, would leave in January to head the new Gorman Crossing Elementary School in Laurel.Drown, who is credited with bringing community-centered programs to Running Brook, was honored by the Washington Post last week with a Distinguished Educational Leadership Award.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2002
Laura F. Lee had just put on her pajamas and settled on the couch to watch the Oscars when her phone rang. A half-hour later, Lee was at Howard County General Hospital's intake desk, translating for a 15-year-old pregnant girl who could not speak English but whose cries of pain signaled in any language that her baby was going to be born any minute. Doctors soon realized that they would also need the Running Brook Elementary School parent educator's translation talents in the delivery room.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1995
A family center at Longfellow Elementary School in Columbia is providing Howard County parents with a one-stop spot for help with their low-income or special education children.The Family Education and Training Center offers information and support to parents of low-income students attending high poverty schools and special education pupils from ages 3 to 20."It's wonderful because they really try to meet your needs," said Jean Daniello, whose 6-year-old twins are first-graders at Running Brook Elementary School.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 18, 2002
STUDENTS IN Yvonne Lund's food and nutrition classes at Wilde Lake High School have been creating a little holiday spirit by constructing a village out of graham crackers and candy, and preparing a feast for their classmates. The confectionery town, called "Sugar Shacks," is on display in the school's guidance office. "These houses are just fabulous," Lund said. "We have everything from small castles to villages. People are coming from all over to see them." The town includes an ice cream shop, whose path is paved with peppermints, a ski shop, a farm complete with animals, and the Ho Ho Ho Night Club.
NEWS
By LARRY STURGILL | September 30, 1992
As we head into the fall season, leaves aren't be the only thing changing in Howard County. There also has been a dramatic change in The Sun. The introduction of the new Howard County edition is a major step in providing county residents with daily local news coverage, along with state, national and world news.One significant improvement to local coverage is the addition of community correspondents like myself. As a county native and a Columbia resident for 15 years, I'm thrilled at the opportunity to be actively involved in this new journalistic venture.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | July 29, 2007
After four weeks of summer school at Running Brook Elementary, nearby residents were used to the steady flow of students at the newly renovated facility. But the sight of two fully grown cattle outside the school's front entrance Friday was a surprise. The two steers - Michael and Angelo - were at the school as part of a challenge issued by Assistant Principals Troy Todd and Brian Vanisko. Todd, who oversaw the 46 students from Running Brook Elementary, and Vanisko, who oversaw the 71 students from nearby Stevens Forest Elementary, joined forces to encourage their students to keep up their attendance at the Running Brook summer school program.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 18, 2002
STUDENTS IN Yvonne Lund's food and nutrition classes at Wilde Lake High School have been creating a little holiday spirit by constructing a village out of graham crackers and candy, and preparing a feast for their classmates. The confectionery town, called "Sugar Shacks," is on display in the school's guidance office. "These houses are just fabulous," Lund said. "We have everything from small castles to villages. People are coming from all over to see them." The town includes an ice cream shop, whose path is paved with peppermints, a ski shop, a farm complete with animals, and the Ho Ho Ho Night Club.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2002
Laura F. Lee had just put on her pajamas and settled on the couch to watch the Oscars when her phone rang. A half-hour later, Lee was at Howard County General Hospital's intake desk, translating for a 15-year-old pregnant girl who could not speak English but whose cries of pain signaled in any language that her baby was going to be born any minute. Doctors soon realized that they would also need the Running Brook Elementary School parent educator's translation talents in the delivery room.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Karen Keys and Tanika White and Karen Keys,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2000
Yesterday was the first day of school at all 66 Howard County schools, and all the early risers -- from Hammond High in the east, to Running Brook Elementary in the heart of the district, to Mount View Middle on the county's edge -- fought back their drab-day yawns and vacation hangovers to usher in the new year with enthusiasm. At the high school, 1,300 students swarmed in. There was hootin', hollerin', "Hey-Girl"-n' and high-fivin'. "Saaammm!" screamed freshman Nancy Tewell, delighted to spot Hammond Middle School classmate Samantha Koshgarian, in a crowded hallway.
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 23, 1998
CHILDREN AT Running Brook Elementary School are getting one-on-one help with reading and math, thanks to a group of about 20 volunteers organized by the Columbia Association's Columbia Volunteer Corps.Part of the association's WeCare Team, the volunteers began working at the school about three weeks ago.Their efforts are being coordinated by volunteers Linda Lazaroff of Hobbit's Glen and Lillian Shapiro of Wilde Lake."It's great to have this enthusiasm," said Jason McCoy, Running Brook's assistant principal.
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 20, 1998
BRYANT WOODS resident Nancy Berla spent several years during the 1980s writing about parental involvement in schools.When she retired a few years ago, she decided to put her ideas into practice by volunteering at her grandchildren's school, Running Brook Elementary.The school's administrators consider her such as asset that they nominated her for a Daily Points of Light Award, a national honor that recognizes outstanding volunteers.L Berla was featured on the Points of Light Web site April 30.Students and staff honored her at a ceremony at the school last month.
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 25, 1998
AS THE controversy rages at Wilde Lake High School over supervised study, one group of students is using the flexible schedule to help children at two nearby elementary schools.Members of Wilde Lake's National Honor Society meet at least once a week with students at Bryant Woods and Running Brook elementary schools in a Big Brother/Big Sister program that began in January last year."It's such a great feeling," said Rachael Miles, 17, a Wilde Lake senior who coordinates the program."When I walk in, I see my child's face light up," she said.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Sun Staff Writer | November 30, 1994
Johnna Rice struggled to motivate her 6-year-old son, Daryl, for school this year after the problems he had understanding reading concepts in kindergarten.But now when the first-grader at Running Brook Elementary School is out with his mother, he pronounces the sounds of letters or reads words he sees."There's a big difference," said Ms. Rice, a fifth-grade teacher at Running Brook in Columbia's Wilde Lake village. "He's motivated to read."Ms. Rice attributes much of Daryl's progress to his participation since the beginning of the school year in a federally funded program known as Chapter 1, which aims to raise the performance of students from elementary schools with relatively high percentages of lower-income families.
NEWS
By Dana Klosner-Wehner and Dana Klosner-Wehner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 10, 2004
RUNNING BROOK Elementary School and local leaders recognized Vivian C. "Millie" Bailey last month by dedicating a bench in her honor. Known as the school's "guardian angel," Bailey, 86, has no children of her own. But she has been raising funds for Running Brook for about seven years, filling teachers' wish lists with everything from crayons, backpacks and snacks for the after-school and Saturday club to computer software, headphones, and musical instruments,...
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 10, 1997
Assistant Principal Marion Miller says she is "looking forward to continuing the traditions" of Running Brook Elementary School when she becomes principal next month.Jason McCoy, a teacher at Guilford Elementary School, will become the assistant principal.Both appointments take effect Jan. 20.Earlier in the year, the Board of Education announced that Principal, Deborah Drown, would leave in January to head the new Gorman Crossing Elementary School in Laurel.Drown, who is credited with bringing community-centered programs to Running Brook, was honored by the Washington Post last week with a Distinguished Educational Leadership Award.
NEWS
By Liz Lean and Liz Lean,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 3, 1996
IT DOESN'T TAKE a rocket scientist to have fun at Math Day today at Running Brook Elementary School. But they've invited one anyway.Joe Davila, a Running Brook parent and NASA engineer, will give a presentation about rockets at 2: 30 p.m. and, weather permitting, blast off a miniature rocket from the playground.Mr. Davila is the father of fifth-grader Eliot and second-grader Carrie.Students and teachers are wearing clothing with numbers and math symbols for a full day of math activities.Eye-opening showA woman's place is in the television studio at Wilde Lake Middle School.
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