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September 11, 1999
Julius Gordon, a combat medic who worehis World War II decorations on his deathbed, died Wednesday of respiratory failure at Cherrywood Healthcare and Rehabilitation Centre in Reisterstown. The Northwest Baltimore resident was 79.Mr. Gordon, known as Jules, enlisted in the Army in 1940. In 1942, he was shipped overseas to the Pacific Theater of operations where he was assigned as a medic to a Marine Corps unit and saw action at Guadalcanal and Bougainville Island.After being discharged in 1945, he returned to Baltimore and owned and operated a wholesale produce business until opening Gordon's Package Goods at Carey and Mosher streets.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
The Baltimore Police Department's top brass recognized officers for bravery and excellence on Friday, the first time the awards ceremony has been held in more than two years. Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake handed out the awards to 30 officers from across the agency. Recipients were shot at and run over. They interrupted assaults, sprang into action while off-duty, or solved complex cases. "We cannot thank you enough for the hard work and courage you have given in your daily jobs," Batts told the officers.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 26, 2001
NEW YORK - Bob Kerrey, a former U.S. senator, has acknowledged that a combat mission in Vietnam for which he was awarded the Bronze Star caused the deaths of 13 to 20 unarmed civilians, most of them women and children. Days before an investigation of his role in the incident was to be published in the New York Times Magazine, Kerrey described his version of the events in interviews with two other newspapers and in a speech. The Times' magazine investigation was carried out jointly with "60 Minutes II," the CBS News program.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2013
Wilbur L. Iley, a decorated World War II veteran who worked in the Harford County dairy industry for many years, died Monday of cancer at the Forest Hill Medical and Rehabilitation Center. The Fallston resident was 94. Mr. Iley was born on his family's farm off Grier Nursery Road in Street and was a 1937 graduate of Highland High School. He worked on the 70-acre farm until he entered military service in the Army during World War II. Family members said he was an expert marksman; he attained the rank of master sergeant.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2003
Nearly 60 years after he was severely wounded on a World War II battlefield, Stanley Hamilton Jr. accepted one of the nation's most prestigious combat medals yesterday. Hamilton, 78, received the Bronze Star, engraved with his name, in a brief ceremony at Westminster's County Office Building. He was a reconnaissance scout for his platoon and continued his mission even after German tanks destroyed the Allied tanks he was using for cover. In the ensuing battle, he lost part of a lung and sustained injuries that partially paralyzed his left arm and shoulder.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun reporter | February 26, 2008
Navy Lt. Melvin Spence Dry dropped out of a helicopter into choppy waters off the coast of North Vietnam in June 1972. On a highly classified mission to rescue two escaped American prisoners of war, he died the moment he hit the water. But because the mission was top-secret, Dry's valor went officially unrecognized. No medals, no commendations and no place of honor among the fallen at the U.S. Naval Academy, where he graduated in 1968. Even his parents were told that he died in a training exercise.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1999
Charles A. Cusumano told his children of the hardships he experienced during World War II, but he had never called himself a war hero until now.More than half a century ago, Cusumano spent three months repairing war planes in New Guinea, suffering a lack of food, bouts of malaria and dengue fever, and an enemy attack that left him with three fractured vertebrae.Yesterday, Cusumano received the Bronze Star his war buddies there got in 1944.Wearing a light blue sport coat and a tie decorated with the stars and stripes, Cusumano stood at attention before a battery of flags in the office of Col. John D. Frketic, garrison commander at Fort Meade.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 1, 2010
Charles Sussman, a retired Baltimore County public schools administrator who was a decorated World War II veteran, died of congestive heart failure Wednesday at Sinai Hospital. He was 85 and lived in Pikesville. Born in Baltimore and raised on Bryant Avenue near Druid Hill Park, he worked as a cashier at the popular delicatessen Sussman and Lev, at 923 E. Baltimore St., which was operated by his father, Jacob. While attending City College, where he graduated in 1942, Mr. Sussman befriended Russell Baker, who went on to become a Baltimore Sun reporter, New York Times columnist and author.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | December 21, 2006
Harry Lindauer, a retired U.S. Army colonel who served in World War II, Korea and Vietnam after fleeing Nazi Germany in 1938, died of age-related complications and an infection Friday at the Ginger Cove retirement community in Annapolis. He was 88. Born in Buttenhausen and raised in Darmstadt, Germany, he was 20 when he left his family's tobacco and soap factory as the Nazi government intensified its campaign against Jewish business owners. Distant relatives sponsored his immigration to Chicago, where he worked initially in a sausage factory.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN REPORTER | November 12, 2007
Nearly 40 years ago, Lloyd E. Jones took a bullet for his country. He was only 23 years old, an engine man on a boat patrolling Vietnam's Mekong Delta, when his crew came under attack. For three months, he clung to life in military hospitals, hoping to return to his parents and two younger siblings in Pasadena. But the wounds were too serious, and Jones died in the spring of 1969. Over the years, LeRoy Jones never stopped thinking about his older brother, with whom he briefly served in the Navy before Lloyd Jones went to Vietnam.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2013
Allan Stover wasn't even in high school when he enlisted in the Coast Guard in 1953. Despite his doctored birth certificate, he believes commanders could tell he was too young to enlist. Stover never admitted it - though he came close when a drill instructor screamed in his face at boot camp. "How old are you?" the instructor yelled. "Seventeen, sir," Stover responded nervously. "And I'm the Queen of Sheba," the instructor quipped. Stover was 14 - and he was never caught.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2013
Milton Bromberg, a custom tailor and decorated World War II veteran who visited the White House to fit President Bill Clinton for suits, died of respiratory failure Nov. 1 at Season's Hospice at Northwest Hospital. He was 90 and lived in Owings Mills. Born in Providence, R.I., he was the son of Benjamin Bromberg, who delivered coal on a horse-drawn cart. His mother, Lena Bromberg, a homemaker, taught him to sew as a boy. While a senior in high school, Mr. Bromberg was drafted into the Army and served in a combat infantry unit in Europe.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2013
John G. "Jack" Cuthbert, a decorated World War II veteran who stormed the beaches of Normandy on D-Day, died July 5 from a heart attack at his Rodgers Forge home. He was 93. John Graham Cuthbert Sr. was born in Baltimore and raised on Barrington Road in Forest Park. After attending Calvert Hall College High School, he went to work as a salesman at Dafoe Motors, which was owned by his father. He enlisted in the Army in 1941, and served with the Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, of the 29th Division's 175th Infantry Regiment.
EXPLORE
July 10, 2013
Willard H. Blevins, a lifelong Fallston resident and World War II combat veteran, who served in the 90th Infantry Division and was honored with a Purple Heart, Oak Leaf Cluster, Bronze Star and a Good Conduct Medal, will celebrate his 90th birthday July 19. He still owns and operates Vale Body & Fender Shop in Fallston with his son, David. He is well beloved by his large family and many friends.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
Frank B. Ober Jr., a farmer and World War II veteran, died Sunday of heart failure at his Hope Hollow Farm. He was 94. The son of Frank B. Ober, a founding partner in the Baltimore law firm of what is now Ober|Kaler, and Margaret Rochester Ober, a homemaker, Frank Benedict Ober Jr. was born in Buffalo, N.Y., and raised on St. Georges Road in Roland Park. Mr. Ober was a 1937 graduate of the Gilman School and spent two years studying at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology before enlisting in the Army in 1942.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
Harry F. Hansen Sr., a highly decorated World War II veteran who landed in the initial wave of troops on Omaha Beach on D-Day and later became a Baltimore businessman, died on Memorial Day from complications of a stroke at Howard County General Hospital. The longtime Ellicott City resident was 96. The son of a butcher and a homemaker, Harry Frederick Hansen was born in Baltimore and raised on Ashton Street in Southwest Baltimore. After graduating from City College in 1935, he worked as a butcher with his father and as a jewelry salesman, before his marriage in 1939 to Edith Mae Stephens.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
Dr. Charles E. Rath Jr. and Charles Shyab both earned the Bronze Star for their valor in battle, but neither soldier collected his medal. At a recent ceremony at Fort Meade, the two veterans, who served in battles more than two decades apart, stood together and received the Bronze Star, awarded for valor and meritorious service. Officials also awarded each a congressional citation and an American flag that has flown over the Capitol against a background of plaudits from a U.S. senator, Army officers and a roomful of young soldiers.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2013
Edward H. "Ham" Welbourn Jr., a retired insurance executive and World War II veteran, died April 29 of complications from dementia at the Blakehurst retirement community in Towson. He was 98. The son of Edward H. Welbourn, who owned Rennous Kleinle Brush Manufacturers in Catonsville, and Emma Dawson Welbourn, a homemaker, Edward Hambleton Welbourn was born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville. After graduating in 1934 from the Gilman School, Mr. Welbourn enrolled at Haverford College, where he was a government major and earned a bachelor's degree in 1938.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2013
William C. Ensor Jr., a retired estate manager and decorated World War II veteran, died Feb. 13 of heart failure at Lorien Mays Chapel. He was 91. The son of farmers, William Clark Ensor Jr. was born in Monkton and later moved with his family to Ruxton, where his father farmed in what is now the Four Winds neighborhood. Mr. Ensor attended Towson High School and enlisted in the Army in 1943, where he served with the 78th Infantry "Lightning" Division in the European theater. Mr. Ensor took part in the Battle of the Bulge and in the capture, intact, of the strategically important Schwammenauel Dam that spanned the Roer River.
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