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By Nicholas Fouriezos and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2013
It took a while, but New York Yankees closer Mariano Rivera finally got his sendoff in what was likely his final appearance at Camden Yards. A rain delay pushed back the Orioles' ceremony honoring the retiring Rivera. But when the future Hall of Famer trotted out toward the mound before Thursday night's game - an odd sight for a player best known best for his presence at the end of games - he was met with a standing ovation. Orioles manager Buck Showalter presented Rivera with a gift from the organization, a bronze sculpture of a bat and ball, before hugging him. The piece shows the ball hitting the bat underneath the barrel, with the bat beginning to break, an homage to the success Rivera has had jamming hitters over his 19-year career.
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By Nicholas Fouriezos and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2013
It took a while, but New York Yankees closer Mariano Rivera finally got his sendoff in what was likely his final appearance at Camden Yards. A rain delay pushed back the Orioles' ceremony honoring the retiring Rivera. But when the future Hall of Famer trotted out toward the mound before Thursday night's game - an odd sight for a player best known best for his presence at the end of games - he was met with a standing ovation. Orioles manager Buck Showalter presented Rivera with a gift from the organization, a bronze sculpture of a bat and ball, before hugging him. The piece shows the ball hitting the bat underneath the barrel, with the bat beginning to break, an homage to the success Rivera has had jamming hitters over his 19-year career.
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SPORTS
By Zach Helfand and The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2012
When Eddie Murray's sculpture is unveiled at Camden Yards this afternoon, if the sun catches the bronze just so, onlookers might get a glimpse of themselves in the reflection. It's fitting for the Orioles' most prolific hitter ever. Writers, and even some fans who didn't like Murray's personality, projected their own bitterness onto him for his entire career. For the fans who didn't care what they read, only what they saw, they'll have their Eddie. They can cheer the man today, and later they can bring their kids to the statue, point and say, "There's one of the best switch hitters to ever play the game.
SPORTS
By Zach Helfand and The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2012
When Eddie Murray's sculpture is unveiled at Camden Yards this afternoon, if the sun catches the bronze just so, onlookers might get a glimpse of themselves in the reflection. It's fitting for the Orioles' most prolific hitter ever. Writers, and even some fans who didn't like Murray's personality, projected their own bitterness onto him for his entire career. For the fans who didn't care what they read, only what they saw, they'll have their Eddie. They can cheer the man today, and later they can bring their kids to the statue, point and say, "There's one of the best switch hitters to ever play the game.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN REPORTER | May 8, 2008
"What's new in Baltimore?" Frank Zappa used to sing at the end of a long, characteristically off-the-wall rock jam he called Clowns on Velvet. What's new in Baltimore, the city in which the late rock star was born in 1940, is evidently a public sculpture of Zappa himself, and the strange tale behind the 15-foot statue that a public art panel accepted as a gift to the city last night is as incongruous as Zappa's genre-bending music career. Most Baltimoreans are aware of their hometown's claim on Edgar Allan Poe, H.L. Mencken and John Waters, but fewer know that Zappa, who made more than 50 records between the late 1950s and his death in 1993, was born in Baltimore, the son of immigrants from Sicily.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Sun Staff Writer | June 10, 1994
Soaring 46 feet into the sky over the Inner Harbor, it would be Baltimore's loftiest sculpture.Baltimoreans of Polish ancestry have commissioned the ambitious abstract bronze by a Polish sculptor to honor 15,000 Polish army officers and intellectuals imprisoned and killed by the Soviet secret police in 1940. The sculptor, Andrzej Pitynski, is donating his time and labor, but the Baltimore group is attempting to raise $300,000 to cover other costs of the project.More than 4,000 of the officers were found massacred -- many of them after torture -- in Poland's Katyn forest.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1995
On a spring day in 1878, a young Naval Academy physics instructor took his students from the confines of the lecture hall and assembled them along the banks of the Severn River. He began to set up an experiment for measuring the speed of light.But what Albert A. Michelson, then 26, achieved was nothing short of revolutionary. He set a measurement that would stand for 45 years and began work that would lead to Albert Einstein's theory of relativity.Michelson, who had graduated from the academy only five years earlier, set up a revolving mirror at one end of the sea wall and a stationary mirror 500 feet away, along with a heliostat, a lens and a tuning fork.
SPORTS
August 7, 1998
Dodgers: Trenidad Hubbard was hit by pitches in the third and sixth innings. Charles Johnson hit a foul ball out of the stadium in the fifth before flying out to left.Expos: Third baseman Shane Andrews missed his third straight start with a pulled right hamstring. He is expected to be ready for this weekend's series with Arizona.Giants: Before the game, the Giants announced plans for a 9-foot bronze sculpture of Willie Mays to be located at Pacific Bell Park's main entrance when the new stadium opens in April 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | October 26, 1995
As part of the College of Notre Dame's centennial celebration, the school's art department has organized "100 Years of Art at the College of Notre Dame: A Faculty Retrospective" at the college's Gormley Gallery. The show of two dozen works contains art by R. McGill Mackall, Jane Schwarz, Gladys Goldstein, Olin Russum and Rufino Tamayo, among others. Also included is Hans Schuler Sr.'s "Pheidippides," a bronze sculpture of the ancient Greek runner who carried the news of the Greek victory in the battle of Marathon to Athens.
NEWS
May 22, 2010
A 40-foot bronze sculpture in rural Maryland of three New York City firefighters raising the U.S. flag at Ground Zero has failed to sell on eBay. The monument to heroes of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks was offered by a court-appointed receiver for 10 days to recoup money for victims of an alleged Ponzi scheme. The auction ended Saturday with no bids. The statue was commissioned by Coadum Advisors Inc., which donated it to the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation in Emmitsburg for a tax break.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN REPORTER | May 8, 2008
"What's new in Baltimore?" Frank Zappa used to sing at the end of a long, characteristically off-the-wall rock jam he called Clowns on Velvet. What's new in Baltimore, the city in which the late rock star was born in 1940, is evidently a public sculpture of Zappa himself, and the strange tale behind the 15-foot statue that a public art panel accepted as a gift to the city last night is as incongruous as Zappa's genre-bending music career. Most Baltimoreans are aware of their hometown's claim on Edgar Allan Poe, H.L. Mencken and John Waters, but fewer know that Zappa, who made more than 50 records between the late 1950s and his death in 1993, was born in Baltimore, the son of immigrants from Sicily.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Sun Staff Writer | June 10, 1994
Soaring 46 feet into the sky over the Inner Harbor, it would be Baltimore's loftiest sculpture.Baltimoreans of Polish ancestry have commissioned the ambitious abstract bronze by a Polish sculptor to honor 15,000 Polish army officers and intellectuals imprisoned and killed by the Soviet secret police in 1940. The sculptor, Andrzej Pitynski, is donating his time and labor, but the Baltimore group is attempting to raise $300,000 to cover other costs of the project.More than 4,000 of the officers were found massacred -- many of them after torture -- in Poland's Katyn forest.
NEWS
March 28, 1996
Sam LeFever of Edgewater has won first prize in the Main Street Gallery's 1996 juried art show for his oil painting "View of Spa Creek."Pat Nees of Arnold was second with a mixed media collage, "Places I Might Have Lived: Paris -- On Stage," and Annapolis artist Terry Brown was third with an oil pastel, "Shadows on a Pond."Honorable mention winners included Marianna Murphy, oil on paper, "Wood Path"; Amy Valiant, black-and-white photograph, "Last Summer"; and Valerie Atwell, bronze sculpture, "Get a Grip."
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1997
A group of local community activists and Polish-Americans is asking state officials to help fund the creation of a bronze sculpture, to be placed in Inner Harbor East in memory of 15,400 military officers and Polish intellectuals killed by Russian soldiers during World War II.Those who were slain by the Soviet NKVD -- the predecessor to the KGB -- in the Katyn Forest in western Russia in May 1940 were some of Poland's most educated doctors, lawyers, soldiers...
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