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By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2004
How do you color Olympic success? If you're preoccupied by swimmer Michael Phelps' multi-medal quest, the debate about gymnast Paul Hamm or the U.S. women's softball team, you may think gold. Yet some of the most memorable moments this week have accompanied Olympic silver and bronze medals: Picture Lauryn Williams winning the silver in the 100 meters, or Deena Kastor's overwhelmed expression as she ran toward her third-place finish in the marathon. Although it's unlikely we'll soon see bronze medalists in VISA commercials, being second or third can bring instant gratification.
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By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2004
How do you color Olympic success? If you're preoccupied by swimmer Michael Phelps' multi-medal quest, the debate about gymnast Paul Hamm or the U.S. women's softball team, you may think gold. Yet some of the most memorable moments this week have accompanied Olympic silver and bronze medals: Picture Lauryn Williams winning the silver in the 100 meters, or Deena Kastor's overwhelmed expression as she ran toward her third-place finish in the marathon. Although it's unlikely we'll soon see bronze medalists in VISA commercials, being second or third can bring instant gratification.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 26, 1995
STONEHENGE, England -- Clews Everard has the toughest job in British tourism.She is the general manager of Stonehenge, the prehistoric circle of stones that lures archaeologists, protesters, Druids, New Age travelers, film crews and 750,000 tourists annually to the green, wind-swept Salisbury Plain.At Stonehenge, people want to celebrate marriages, have their loved one's ashes spread, pray, and play music at sunrise. There was even a group of protesters who showed up in May and rappelled off the stones.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | September 5, 1999
When art conservator Steven Tatti saw the Francis Scott Key Monument earlier this year, he says, it reminded him of "a public urinal or bath." Covered in trash and graffiti, with a broken fountain and cracked cement, it had been neglected for years.Now, after a few months in the hands of his small crew of restoration experts, it's back in all its glory.And this Saturday at 3 p.m., preservationists, history buffs and others will gather to celebrate completion of the group's $125,000 restoration of the monument on Eutaw Place at Lanvale Street in the Bolton Hill historic district.
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By San Francisco Examiner | May 24, 1999
Climaxing more than seven years of diplomatic effort, a blockbuster collection of Chinese archaeological treasures will be exhibited at three U.S. museums this year and next, beginning at the National Gallery in Washington."
NEWS
By Boston Globe | October 3, 1991
His finely sewn leather outfit and panoply of weapons indicate that the Bronze Age man dug from a glacier this month was probably a warrior or other high-status person, Austrian archaeologists said this week as they stepped up their study of the find.But the archaeologists at the University of Innsbruck say they may never solve the mystery of why the heavily armed "Ice Man" had ventured so high in the Tyrol mountains, and how he met death 4,000 years ago in an Alpine pass near the Italian border.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | January 4, 1994
CHICAGO -- A research team has discovered the world's oldest tin mine, a lengthy network of narrow tunnels, as well as the bones of workers who apparently labored in them, in the mountains of southern Turkey.The find answers a long-standing puzzle of how people in the Middle East region, where experts believe the Bronze Age began, were able to obtain the key ingredient for the important alloy.The discovery of the nearly 5,000-year-old mine by Aslihan Yener, an assistant professor at the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute and her colleagues, also fuels a current archaeological debate on how metal technology spread.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | September 5, 1999
When art conservator Steven Tatti saw the Francis Scott Key Monument earlier this year, he says, it reminded him of "a public urinal or bath." Covered in trash and graffiti, with a broken fountain and cracked cement, it had been neglected for years.Now, after a few months in the hands of his small crew of restoration experts, it's back in all its glory.And this Saturday at 3 p.m., preservationists, history buffs and others will gather to celebrate completion of the group's $125,000 restoration of the monument on Eutaw Place at Lanvale Street in the Bolton Hill historic district.
NEWS
July 29, 2002
James Pilgrim, a fine arts consultant who organized international shows as a Metropolitan Museum of Art administrator in New York, died Friday of complications from lung cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 61 and lived in Brooklandville. Mr. Pilgrim, who did financial work for museums, held a number of administrative positions with the Metropolitan, and from 1978 to 1988 was its deputy director. He held curatorial posts at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington in the early 1970s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | January 22, 1998
The Mitchell Gallery of St. John's College in Annapolis is now showing an exhibit of more than 50 works of Asian ceramics created in China, Korea, Vietnam and Thailand and dating from 300 B.C. to the 19th century. The show includes porcelains and stoneware, glazed and unglazed pieces in a variety of shapes. Among the pieces are an earthenware jar of about 300 B.C. found in excavations of bronze age culture in northeastern Thailand; a 15th century Vietnamese porcelain dish decorated with a peony spray surrounded by petal designs unique to Vietnamese ceramics; a white porcelain Chinese dish of the 14th or 15th century, and an unglazed gray stoneware Korean vase of the 11th or 12th century.
FEATURES
By San Francisco Examiner | May 24, 1999
Climaxing more than seven years of diplomatic effort, a blockbuster collection of Chinese archaeological treasures will be exhibited at three U.S. museums this year and next, beginning at the National Gallery in Washington."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 26, 1995
STONEHENGE, England -- Clews Everard has the toughest job in British tourism.She is the general manager of Stonehenge, the prehistoric circle of stones that lures archaeologists, protesters, Druids, New Age travelers, film crews and 750,000 tourists annually to the green, wind-swept Salisbury Plain.At Stonehenge, people want to celebrate marriages, have their loved one's ashes spread, pray, and play music at sunrise. There was even a group of protesters who showed up in May and rappelled off the stones.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | January 4, 1994
CHICAGO -- A research team has discovered the world's oldest tin mine, a lengthy network of narrow tunnels, as well as the bones of workers who apparently labored in them, in the mountains of southern Turkey.The find answers a long-standing puzzle of how people in the Middle East region, where experts believe the Bronze Age began, were able to obtain the key ingredient for the important alloy.The discovery of the nearly 5,000-year-old mine by Aslihan Yener, an assistant professor at the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute and her colleagues, also fuels a current archaeological debate on how metal technology spread.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | October 3, 1991
His finely sewn leather outfit and panoply of weapons indicate that the Bronze Age man dug from a glacier this month was probably a warrior or other high-status person, Austrian archaeologists said this week as they stepped up their study of the find.But the archaeologists at the University of Innsbruck say they may never solve the mystery of why the heavily armed "Ice Man" had ventured so high in the Tyrol mountains, and how he met death 4,000 years ago in an Alpine pass near the Italian border.
NEWS
June 27, 1994
TODAY, new weapons technology spreads rapidly around the world, but that was not always the case. The bow and arrow, for example, first appeared in North Africa and Southern Europe 15,000 years ago, but didn't become common in Northern Europe until the ninth millennium B.C. It took some 7,000 years for the technology to spread from Italy to Sweden.By contrast, nuclear weapons are only about 50 years old, but already they have spread to nearly every continent. And it's likely a dozen or more new members may join the nuclear club in the next millennium.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 12, 1992
VIENNA, Austria -- The mummified man discovered in a melting Alpine glacier last September is older than first believed, dating from the late Neolithic rather than the Early Bronze age, scientists and historians say.Two independent tests of radiocarbon dates have been conducted on pieces of grass from a woven mat found with the man. They show he died at least 4,600 years ago, or about 2,600 B.C., said Sigmar Bortenschlager, director of the Institute of...
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