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NEWS
By DANIEL BERGER | February 13, 1993
Zoo is defined in the Oxford English Dictionary as ''colloq. [The first three letters of Zoological taken as one syllable.] The Zoological Gardens in Regent's Park, London; also extended to similar collections of animals elsewhere.''The first collections of exotic animals of which we know were in ancient Egypt and China. In modern Europe, they were called menageries and belonged to potentates.During the French revolution, the mob looted the one at Versailles, eating some specimens and moving others to the Jardin des Plantes in Paris.
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NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2010
An okapi, an African animal related to giraffes, died Saturday night after digestive problems, the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore announced Monday. Karen, who was 6 years old, stopped eating last week, said Mike McClure, the zoo's general curator. Okapi (pronounced oh-KAH-pee) have short reddish-brown coats and white stripes, and are usually found in the forests of the Democratic Republic of Congo. A necropsy to determine the cause of death will be performed, but officials believe she was having a "gut stasis" issue, McClure said.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | April 24, 1992
NEW YORK -- There is something noticeably different about the New York Yankees these days. Downright strange, in fact.It is not the presence of a new high-priced superstar, because Danny Tartabull and his five-year, $25 million contract are only the latest for a team that laid the foundation for baseball's eight-figure salary binge.Nor is it the absence of meddlesome owner George Steinbrenner, who hasn't been around the clubhouse or in his private box since being banished by commissioner Fay Vincent nearly two years ago."
SPORTS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 16, 2003
NEW YORK - It was just five days ago that the New York Yankees were in such apparent turmoil that there were serious whispers about the job security of highly successful manager Joe Torre. Six Houston Astros pitchers combined to throw the first no-hitter against the Yankees in 45 years, an indignity of such magnitude at Yankee Stadium that volatile owner George Steinbrenner was imagined to be on the verge of one of those classic Boss blowups. Only in New York could such a fluky game become an end-of-the-world-as-we-know-it kind of moment, and only in the Bronx could a team slip a half game out of first place and truly believe itself to be in crisis.
FEATURES
By Bruce Weber and Bruce Weber,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 26, 1997
For some time now, because I have a friend who travels frequently, I have lived in close proximity to animals -- hers. They are a dog and a cat, Lucille and Maggie -- granted, not exactly critters you find in the wild, but there is a zoo-like quality that my apartment has taken on lately.I've been witness to a lot of stalking, a participant in a lot of nonverbal communication, a monitor of mood swings. As any pet owner learns quickly, animals make you contemplate them -- and yourself.All this prepared me nicely for my recent couple of days at the International Wildlife Conservation Park, a k a New York's Bronx Zoo. The cold-weather season is a good time for adults to visit, I discovered, largely because the great herds of tiny cotton-candy eaters (a populous species of the genus children)
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1996
NEW YORK -- The bleacher bums of the Bronx take it as a matter of pride that they are called the rudest, crudest baseball fans on the planet, so it should come as no surprise that the chant that greeted Orioles second baseman Roberto Alomar during each of his six at-bats yesterday cannot be printed here."
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1999
NEW YORK -- Suddenly the sky vanishes behind a mosaic of green leaves, and the hot summer air becomes lush and heavy, as though pregnant with moisture. Mist, rising from a nearby waterfall, swirls by in curly ribbons. Go ahead. Follow the meandering mud path, but step carefully: Just beyond your left foot lies a clump of elephant dung. A few feet away, a hoof mark, a delicate quarter-moon, has been etched in the hard-packed dirt.You might think you are on safari in the rain forests of Africa, but you are not. Instead you are entering the Congo Gorilla Forest at the Bronx Zoo, not far from Yankee Stadium.
NEWS
March 29, 1996
Dr. Warren Wetzel,47, a surgeon specializing in the treatment of snakebites and other physical traumas, died Sunday at his home in the Bronx. The cause was prostate cancer, according to the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University.He was on the Einstein staff for 15 years and was chief of the Snake Bite Center at Jacobi Medical Center, a hospital affiliated with Einstein, from 1985 to 1994. He also was the snakebite consultant for the Bronx Zoo and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Association.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 26, 1999
NEW YORK -- In a new effort to identify the mosquito-borne disease that has killed three people in New York City, health officials sent dozens of staff members through city streets yesterday to retrieve dead birds for testing.The search for dead birds comes one day after experts discovered that a disease they believed to be St. Louis encephalitis -- which killed dozens of birds at the Bronx Zoo and has infected at least 14 people in New York City and four in Westchester County -- may be the rare West Nile virus, which has not been diagnosed in the Western Hemisphere, government scientists said.
NEWS
By Francis X. Clines and Francis X. Clines,New York Times News Service Staff writer David Michael Ettlin contributed to this article | February 4, 1993
NEW YORK -- The New York Zoological Society, deciding that the word "zoo" had become an urban pejorative with a limited horizon, announced yesterday that it was dropping the word from the names of the Bronx Zoo, the Central Park Zoo, the Queens Zoo and the Prospect Park Zoo.They are to be called "wildlife conservation parks" beginning Monday, said William Conway, president of the society. Mr. Conway concedes that he runs a great risk of bestirring much of the urban menagerie beyond the 10,000 creatures of the, uh, zoos.
NEWS
By James Barron and James Barron,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 5, 2003
NEW YORK -- Tiger Mountain at the Bronx Zoo is the new $8.5 million home of half a dozen Siberian tigers that have been moved from the Wild Asia exhibit, where people riding a monorail once got their best glimpses of tigers through binoculars. Tiger Mountain offers the possibility of nose-to-nose views through inch-thick glass. Or, if the tigers decide to go for a swim in the 10,000-gallon pool, through 2-inch-thick glass. One recent Monday not much swimming was going on. One tiger went so far as to drink from the pool.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 26, 1999
NEW YORK -- In a new effort to identify the mosquito-borne disease that has killed three people in New York City, health officials sent dozens of staff members through city streets yesterday to retrieve dead birds for testing.The search for dead birds comes one day after experts discovered that a disease they believed to be St. Louis encephalitis -- which killed dozens of birds at the Bronx Zoo and has infected at least 14 people in New York City and four in Westchester County -- may be the rare West Nile virus, which has not been diagnosed in the Western Hemisphere, government scientists said.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1999
NEW YORK -- Suddenly the sky vanishes behind a mosaic of green leaves, and the hot summer air becomes lush and heavy, as though pregnant with moisture. Mist, rising from a nearby waterfall, swirls by in curly ribbons. Go ahead. Follow the meandering mud path, but step carefully: Just beyond your left foot lies a clump of elephant dung. A few feet away, a hoof mark, a delicate quarter-moon, has been etched in the hard-packed dirt.You might think you are on safari in the rain forests of Africa, but you are not. Instead you are entering the Congo Gorilla Forest at the Bronx Zoo, not far from Yankee Stadium.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | April 13, 1999
NEW YORK -- On Opening Day Ray Miller insisted he doesn't manage while looking in the rear-view mirror. Good thing. What's ahead is scary enough.Six games into a new season and the Orioles already confront a huge obstacle tonight when they meet the New York Yankees in their little house of horrors to begin a nine-game road trip. If Cal Ripken isn't falling into a photographer's pit, then the Dominican Strongman is serving chin music or Miller is getting thumbed for arguing against injustice.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 13, 1997
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. -- Civilization long ago conquered the wilderness along Central Avenue, bringing with it such outposts of progress as Barnes & Noble,and Bed Bath and Beyond.That is why residents were thunderstruck last week when a black bear began prowling the strip malls along Westchester County's premier commercial thoroughfare like a suburban shopper craving a snack.But a dragnet involving at least three suburban police departments more accustomed to chasing burglars than bears snared the animal Friday afternoon on the 15th hole of the Ridgeway Country Club's golf course, a short walk from Bloomingdale's on the edge of downtown White Plains.
FEATURES
By Bruce Weber and Bruce Weber,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 26, 1997
For some time now, because I have a friend who travels frequently, I have lived in close proximity to animals -- hers. They are a dog and a cat, Lucille and Maggie -- granted, not exactly critters you find in the wild, but there is a zoo-like quality that my apartment has taken on lately.I've been witness to a lot of stalking, a participant in a lot of nonverbal communication, a monitor of mood swings. As any pet owner learns quickly, animals make you contemplate them -- and yourself.All this prepared me nicely for my recent couple of days at the International Wildlife Conservation Park, a k a New York's Bronx Zoo. The cold-weather season is a good time for adults to visit, I discovered, largely because the great herds of tiny cotton-candy eaters (a populous species of the genus children)
FEATURES
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,Contributing Writer | May 24, 1992
The trail leads deep into a Southeast Asian tropical rain forest, a steamy jungle with lush vegetation that closes in around us. We brush aside the dangling vines and peer through the trees for any signs of life.From the distance white-cheeked gibbons approach, swinging through the treetops. A silvered leaf monkey perched on high cuddles her tiny youngster, whose bright orange fur makes him easy to see if the troop must flee.In a nearby mangrove swamp, a family of proboscis monkeys is busily playing, arguing, resting and tending their young at water's edge.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writer | July 13, 1993
The Baltimore Zoo announced yesterday its most blessed event of the year -- the birth of a pair of endangered Siberian tiger cubs.Watched over by an infrared video camera, mother Alisa gave birth to the 4-pound pair, gender as yet undetermined, between 3:15 p.m. and 4:45 p.m. Sunday in a bed of straw placed strategically in her den by keepers. A third cub, a female, was stillborn.Alisa was sent here in late winter by the International Wildlife Conservation Park (formerly the Bronx Zoo) on a long-term breeding loan -- chosen along with the Baltimore Zoo's male Fasier as the nation's most genetically desirable pair of captive, prospective Siberian tiger parents.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1996
NEW YORK -- The bleacher bums of the Bronx take it as a matter of pride that they are called the rudest, crudest baseball fans on the planet, so it should come as no surprise that the chant that greeted Orioles second baseman Roberto Alomar during each of his six at-bats yesterday cannot be printed here."
NEWS
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1996
NEW YORK -- Floating on a cloud of otherworldly odors, thousands of vengeful, unwashed New Yorkers circled Yankee Stadium yesterday -- drinking beer for breakfast and cursing the Orioles as they waited to snap up 16,000 tickets for their showdown with Crabtown."
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