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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 15, 1998
Yefim Bronfman finishes lunch, turns his hands palms-up and looks at his finger ends."Not today, no more practicing today," says Bronfman, practically as if he is speaking to himself.His hands are padded like a bear's paws, but the ends of his fingers are about to split open. He had spent the two hours before lunch across the street in Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, rehearsing Bartok's Piano Concerto No. 1 with the Baltimore Symphony and guest conductor Lan Shui. The Bartok No. 1 is a demanding piece, but that's not the reason that Bronfman's fingers are about to begin bleeding.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Vocal recitals are rare enough in Baltimore that even a program of familiar lieder would qualify as a novelty. A program of way-off-the-beaten-path songs? That's beyond cool. Magdalena Kozena, the high-profile, Czech mezzo-soprano, and her equally high-profile accompanist, the Russian-born, Israeli-American pianist Yefim Bronfman, chose a fascinating sample of repertoire for their recital Sunday night presented by the  Shriver Hall Concert Series . Four of the five composers on the bill came from the mainstream, but the works selected for this occasion did not.  In Mussorgsky's song cycle "The Nursery," which evokes the alternately animated, awed and mischievous mindset of a child, Kozena offered an abundance of colorful vocal touches -- even a nose-thumbing gesture for good measure.
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FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | May 29, 1992
Yefim Bronfman may make his living by playing big, exciting concertos -- such as the Liszt A Major Concerto he will perform tonight, tomorrow and Sunday with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra -- but his career hasn't been the kind that makes people talk. That's to say that for the Russian-Israeli-American pianist there have been no splashy competition victories, no outrageous concert platform demeanor (no punk hairdos or outfits for him!), and no interpretive idiosyncrasies that have made him the object of a cult following.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 19, 2010
Yefim Bronfman, 51, who was just awarded the $50,000 Jean Gimbel Lane Prize in Piano Performance from Northwestern University, has been among the finest virtuosos for more than 30 years. He plays a recital this weekend for the Shriver Hall Concert Series. Question: Your recital includes Tchaikovsky's Grand Sonata, which you recently learned. Why do you think it's so rarely heard? Answer: It was performed a lot in the '30s and '40s, but for some reason not much after the Second World War. I want to change that.
NEWS
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 11, 2005
NEW YORK / / Like soldiers at attention, lined up for a drill master's inspection, five grand pianos -- each 9 feet long, weighing in at 990 pounds, with about 12,000 individual parts -- sat along the wall of the nondescript, low-ceilinged selection room at the Steinway & Sons factory in Queens. The inspector, acclaimed Russian-born pianist Yefim Bronfman, calmly approached the formation and, progressing from left to right, put each instrument to the test -- rapid scales up and down the length of the keyboard, punchy chords, gentle phrases.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 6, 1995
Hollywood's most closely watched deal ended up on the cutting-room floor yesterday as negotiations for Michael Ovitz to become head of the entertainment giant MCA Inc. unexpectedly collapsed.The end of the talks scuttled plans by Seagram Co.'s president, Edgar Bronfman Jr., to give Mr. Ovitz, chairman of the Creative Artists Agency, the reins of MCA, which Seagram now controls.Mr. Ovitz, who wields enormous clout in Hollywood as the top deal maker in the movie business, had been seeking about $250 million in compensation and equity from Seagram in return for agreeing to give up his majority stake in the talent agency and run MCA, individuals involved in the negotiations said.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 1, 1997
NEW YORK -- Sony Corp. and Cineplex Odeon Corp. said yesterday that Sony will merge its Loews Theaters unit with Cineplex to create one of the world's largest movie theater companies, with annual revenue of about $1 billion.Sony will own 49.9 percent of the voting shares of the combined company, to be called Loews Cineplex Entertainment.Seagram Co.'s Universal Studios, which already owned a Cineplex stake, will own 26.7 percent of the company after investing $85 million in the new company, the companies said.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | March 15, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A big U.S. oil company said yesterday that it would not proceed with its agreement to develop two large offshore oil fields for Iran after the White House announced that President Clinton would issue a directive barring all such transactions.The step by Conoco Inc. ended an energy deal that would have been the first involving Iran and the United States since Washington severed relations with Tehran in 1980.It came after eight days of debate within the administration about how and whether to block an agreement that top deputies to Clinton acknowledged was legal but said could undermine U.S. efforts to isolate Iran.
NEWS
January 28, 2006
Fayard Nicholas, 91, who with his brother Harold inspired generations of tap-dancers from Fred Astaire to Savion Glover, died Tuesday at his home in Los Angeles of pneumonia and other complications from a stroke. The Nicholas brothers were boys when they were featured at New York's Cotton Club in 1932. Though young, they were billed as "The Show Stoppers!" And despite the racial hurdles facing black performers, they went on to Broadway, then Hollywood. Mr. Astaire once told the brothers that the acrobatic elegance of their "Jumpin' Jive" dance sequence in Stormy Weather (1943)
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 3, 1997
LONDON -- Thomas Borer, a blunt Swiss diplomat, took on the head of the World Jewish Congress yesterday over Switzerland's culpability in the handling of gold the Nazis stole from Holocaust victims and conquered countries."
NEWS
January 28, 2006
Fayard Nicholas, 91, who with his brother Harold inspired generations of tap-dancers from Fred Astaire to Savion Glover, died Tuesday at his home in Los Angeles of pneumonia and other complications from a stroke. The Nicholas brothers were boys when they were featured at New York's Cotton Club in 1932. Though young, they were billed as "The Show Stoppers!" And despite the racial hurdles facing black performers, they went on to Broadway, then Hollywood. Mr. Astaire once told the brothers that the acrobatic elegance of their "Jumpin' Jive" dance sequence in Stormy Weather (1943)
NEWS
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 11, 2005
NEW YORK / / Like soldiers at attention, lined up for a drill master's inspection, five grand pianos -- each 9 feet long, weighing in at 990 pounds, with about 12,000 individual parts -- sat along the wall of the nondescript, low-ceilinged selection room at the Steinway & Sons factory in Queens. The inspector, acclaimed Russian-born pianist Yefim Bronfman, calmly approached the formation and, progressing from left to right, put each instrument to the test -- rapid scales up and down the length of the keyboard, punchy chords, gentle phrases.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 20, 2001
A year ago today, Yuri Temirkanov gave his first concert as music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. This week, the wisdom of that appointment couldn't have been more clear. On Thursday evening at Meyerhoff Hall, the Temirkanov touch came through magically right at the delicate start of Weber's "Oberon" Overture, with superb pacing and shading to create a suspenseful, woodsy atmosphere. The responsiveness of the musicians throughout the overture spoke volumes about the way they have gotten firmly into the Temirkanov groove, which involves molding phrases with spontaneity, freedom and joy. He makes the music come from deep inside.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 15, 1998
Yefim Bronfman finishes lunch, turns his hands palms-up and looks at his finger ends."Not today, no more practicing today," says Bronfman, practically as if he is speaking to himself.His hands are padded like a bear's paws, but the ends of his fingers are about to split open. He had spent the two hours before lunch across the street in Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, rehearsing Bartok's Piano Concerto No. 1 with the Baltimore Symphony and guest conductor Lan Shui. The Bartok No. 1 is a demanding piece, but that's not the reason that Bronfman's fingers are about to begin bleeding.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 3, 1997
LONDON -- Thomas Borer, a blunt Swiss diplomat, took on the head of the World Jewish Congress yesterday over Switzerland's culpability in the handling of gold the Nazis stole from Holocaust victims and conquered countries."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 1, 1997
NEW YORK -- Sony Corp. and Cineplex Odeon Corp. said yesterday that Sony will merge its Loews Theaters unit with Cineplex to create one of the world's largest movie theater companies, with annual revenue of about $1 billion.Sony will own 49.9 percent of the voting shares of the combined company, to be called Loews Cineplex Entertainment.Seagram Co.'s Universal Studios, which already owned a Cineplex stake, will own 26.7 percent of the company after investing $85 million in the new company, the companies said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 19, 2010
Yefim Bronfman, 51, who was just awarded the $50,000 Jean Gimbel Lane Prize in Piano Performance from Northwestern University, has been among the finest virtuosos for more than 30 years. He plays a recital this weekend for the Shriver Hall Concert Series. Question: Your recital includes Tchaikovsky's Grand Sonata, which you recently learned. Why do you think it's so rarely heard? Answer: It was performed a lot in the '30s and '40s, but for some reason not much after the Second World War. I want to change that.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | May 29, 1992
Yefim Bronfman may make his living by playing big, exciting concertos -- such as the Liszt A Major Concerto he will perform tonight, tomorrow and Sunday with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra -- but his career hasn't been the kind that makes people talk. That's to say that for the Russian-Israeli-American pianist there have been no splashy competition victories, no outrageous concert platform demeanor (no punk hairdos or outfits for him!), and no interpretive idiosyncrasies that have made him the object of a cult following.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 6, 1995
Hollywood's most closely watched deal ended up on the cutting-room floor yesterday as negotiations for Michael Ovitz to become head of the entertainment giant MCA Inc. unexpectedly collapsed.The end of the talks scuttled plans by Seagram Co.'s president, Edgar Bronfman Jr., to give Mr. Ovitz, chairman of the Creative Artists Agency, the reins of MCA, which Seagram now controls.Mr. Ovitz, who wields enormous clout in Hollywood as the top deal maker in the movie business, had been seeking about $250 million in compensation and equity from Seagram in return for agreeing to give up his majority stake in the talent agency and run MCA, individuals involved in the negotiations said.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | March 15, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A big U.S. oil company said yesterday that it would not proceed with its agreement to develop two large offshore oil fields for Iran after the White House announced that President Clinton would issue a directive barring all such transactions.The step by Conoco Inc. ended an energy deal that would have been the first involving Iran and the United States since Washington severed relations with Tehran in 1980.It came after eight days of debate within the administration about how and whether to block an agreement that top deputies to Clinton acknowledged was legal but said could undermine U.S. efforts to isolate Iran.
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