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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
Judith S. Campbell, a retired commodity futures broker, died of multiple sclerosis Monday at her Parkton home. She was 61. Judith Sheffield was born in Baltimore and raised in Rosedale. After graduating from Overlea High School in 1969, she earned a bachelor's degree in psychology from what is now Towson University. While living in Denver, Mrs. Campbell became a licensed commodity futures broker. In the 1970s, she joined Campbell & Co. in Baltimore, which had been co-founded by her husband, Kevin B. Campbell, in 1972.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Daniel W. Hubers, a retired real estate broker who was also a competitive sailor, died Saturday at Franklin Square Medical Center of heart failure. The lifelong Middle River resident was 96. The son of Anton Hubers, an optometrist, and Anna Hubers, a homemaker, Daniel Weber Hubers was born and raised on Weber Avenue in Essex. He was a 1936 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School and attended what is now Loyola University Maryland, where he was a pre-med student. Mr. Hubers graduated from the University of Baltimore School of Law but never took the Maryland bar examination.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
Albert C. Haeger, a veteran customhouse broker and freight forwarder who owned and operated the old William H. Masson Inc. brokerage, died Aug. 3 of pancreatic cancer at his Bel Air home. He was 85. The son of a merchant marine engineer and a homemaker, Albert Charles Haeger was born and raised on Staten Island, N.Y., where he graduated in 1945 from St. Peter's High School. When he was 18 and fresh out of high school, Mr. Haeger began answering newspaper ads for jobs at custom brokerage firms and received only one reply.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
It's possible that Matthew Olshan didn't fully become a writer until the day that his future boss ordered him to dig a ditch. On that day in the late 1980s, the boss, a carpenter, eyed the short kid with the soft hands. He saw a young man with no experience in the building trades, a new degree from Harvard University and a bewildering mix of aspirations that combined literature and woodworking. The older man understandably was skeptical. "Show up tomorrow and we'll see how you do," he told Olshan.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
Joan B. McClernan, a retired real estate broker and animal lover, died May 23 of complications from chronic pulmonary obstructive disease at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 79. The daughter of a businessman and a homemaker, Joan Brown was born and raised in Media, Pa., and graduated in 1951 from Radnor High School. She worked as a secretary in Philadelphia, and after her marriage to an aerospace engineer, lived in Cape Canaveral, Fla., and Detroit. She moved to Monkton in the early 1960s when her husband took a job with the old Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
A former Towson-based financial advisor for Signator Investors Inc. was found liable, along with the firm, for losses of elderly clients' retirement funds, according to a decision Tuesday by arbitrators for a securities industry regulator. The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority panel awarded almost $1.6 million to the former broker's clients - Edward A. Blank, Doreen Baker Blank and the estate of Della A.B. Baker - for losses and fees, according to a FINRA award. The clients, who were advised by broker James Robert Glover at Signator over 14 years, lost all their retirement savings after investments were placed in risky products, according to their attorneys at New Orleans law firm Fishman Haygood Phelps Walmsley Willis & Swanson.
NEWS
August 17, 2012
Commentator Robert Pines could not have been more wrong in his statement that East Jerusalem was "annexed" by Israel in 1967 ("U.S. must recognize Israel's capital," Aug. 15). The facts are that Israel started a war in 1967 in order to steal Palestinian lands in Gaza, the West Bank and East Jerusalem. The U.S. should demand a just Israeli-Palestinian peace settlement based on the pre-1967 borders, with East Jerusalem as the capital of the new Palestinian state. It is time for the U.S. to end all financial, military and political aid to Israel and become an honest broker for peace in the Middle East.
BUSINESS
By James M. Woodard and James M. Woodard,Copley News Service | February 2, 1992
When you work with a real estate broker in a home-selling or home-buying transaction, who is that broker really representing?That buyer may think the broker he contacted will represent his [the buyer's] best interests. But in many cases the broker has a legal and fiduciary obligation to represent the interests of the property's owner-seller, not the buyer.When a broker lists a home,he signs a listing contract that obligates him to represent the best interests of the seller. When he shows or sells a home listed by another broker, he works as a subagent under the broker who has the listing -- still, indirectly, representing the interests of the seller.
BUSINESS
By Sylvia Porter and Sylvia Porter,1990, Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 1, 1991
Pressures on brokers to produce sales and commissions just to hold their jobs may encourage investments that are not in the customer's best interest. Whatever the cause, broker-customer disputes are on the increase.How can you avoid disputes with your broker? What choices do you have within the system to resolve your complaints?"You should realize that once you open a brokerage account, arbitration is the only game in town," says Hartley Bernstein, a partner in the New York law firm of Brandeis, Bernstein and a specialist in securities law,Investing through a broker can be a fair game if investors make certain it is played on a level field, Bernstein believes.
BUSINESS
By CBS MarketWatch | November 28, 2004
Most home-loan shoppers bypass mortgage brokers and go straight to lenders, but those who use brokers are happier about their experience, according to a new J.D. Power report. Twenty-nine percent of home mortgage customers use a broker, and they score 7.1 on J.D. Power's satisfaction index, with 10 being top honors, according to the survey of more than 11,000 mortgage customers. Another 72 percent went directly to a lender, and their satisfaction score was slightly lower, at 7. But the happiest consumers were the 5 percent who shopped around, first talking to a broker and then applying for a loan directly through a lender.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 25, 2014
Sen. John McCain, who endlessly enjoys twisting the tail of what he suggests is a paper tiger in the White House, has altered the old Teddy Roosevelt axiom. He accuses President Obama of talking tough but carrying a big "twig. " Thus does he lament the president's penchant for drawing red lines on adversaries' foreign-policy misconduct, followed by subsequent timidity. He cites Obama's harsh words against Syrian atrocities and lack of action against them, and his mild sanctions in response to the recent Russian interventions in Crimea and eastern Ukraine.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 24, 2014
Colliers International in Baltimore, a full-service commercial real estate firm, brokered the sale of a fully leased 53,000-square-foot industrial-flex building at 1361 Brass Mill Road in Belcamp, for $5.5 million. Colliers represented the seller Northcross East, a Harford County developer. "This continues the trend of interest in stabilized, well-located industrial-flex assets in the North I-95 Corridor," David Dannenfelser, managing director and principal of Colliers | Baltimore, said.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
A former Towson-based financial advisor for Signator Investors Inc. was found liable, along with the firm, for losses of elderly clients' retirement funds, according to a decision Tuesday by arbitrators for a securities industry regulator. The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority panel awarded almost $1.6 million to the former broker's clients - Edward A. Blank, Doreen Baker Blank and the estate of Della A.B. Baker - for losses and fees, according to a FINRA award. The clients, who were advised by broker James Robert Glover at Signator over 14 years, lost all their retirement savings after investments were placed in risky products, according to their attorneys at New Orleans law firm Fishman Haygood Phelps Walmsley Willis & Swanson.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
James J. Lacy Jr., who set a national scoring record as a standout basketball forward at what is now Loyola University Maryland and was a retired insurance broker, died of complications from melanoma Saturday at his North Roland Park home. He was 87. In 1949, Mr. Lacy was the nation's highest-scoring collegiate basketball player with 2,199 points. "People worshipped him as a player. He was known as No. 16," said former Evening Sun sports editor Bill Tanton. "They played in that little bandbox [of an arena]
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
Garnette Lynch Brant, a retired real estate saleswoman who also had a Waverly consignment shop, died of congestive heart failure Nov. 19 at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 93 and lived in Lutherville. Born Mary Garnette Lynch in Yadkin County, N.C., she was raised in Winston-Salem. She was the daughter of Sallie Wishon Ledbetter, an R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. employee, and Luther Lynch, a carpenter. She graduated from Bowman Gray High School in 1937 and became a bookkeeper. In 1940, she left Winston-Salem and moved to Washington, D.C., to work in Army intelligence.
NEWS
By Joseline Peña-Melnyk | November 14, 2013
Women political leaders from the east and west came together in Washington D.C. this summer to advance women's roles in building sustainable peace as part of the women's leadership conference, "Women at the Tables of Power. " This exchange between U.S. state legislators and women parliamentarians was a golden opportunity to listen to women whose backgrounds are unlike my own, and to learn about the special challenges they face. I stood shoulder to shoulder with women leaders from Egypt, Morocco, Afghanistan and Pakistan whose work and courage I admire.
BUSINESS
By MarketWatch | October 21, 2007
NEW YORK -- Do you feel as though you're getting bulldozed by your broker? Remember: Stockbrokers aren't just financial professionals: They're salespeople, and they aren't above using heavy-handed sales tactics on occasion. Here are some questions to ask about the stock being hawked: How has that stock done lately? What are the reliable long-range earnings forecasts for the stock? Is the stock undervalued? One sign that a stock could be a good buy is that its price is near the bottom of its trading range of the past few months.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | July 27, 1997
CONSUMER advocates aren't happy about it, but a growing number of federal courts are weighing in with an identical answer to the most controversial question in home mortgage finance today: If a mortgage broker is paid extra money by a lender for persuading you to sign up for a loan with a higher interest rate than the prevailing market rate, is that necessarily // illegal?The answer, according to rulings in several key cases in the past three weeks, is no.Federal judges in Massachusetts, Virginia and Florida have denied class-action certification to suits against brokers and major mortgage lenders, including CrossLand Mortgage Corp.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
A powerful voice joined the growing chorus to raise the state's minimum wage Thursday as Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller said it was time for Maryland to act. "Blue-collar people are finding it increasingly hard to make ends meet," Miller said. "I think it's time to increase the minimum wage. It's just a matter of figuring out how to do it without laying people off. " He said tying a wage increase to a cut in the corporate income tax could be a way to win votes in Annapolis.
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