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Broken Promises

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NEWS
December 27, 2012
Given Johns Hopkins disappointing record for successfully rebuilding communities, I found it interesting to read the institution will invest $10 million to rebuild the Homewood community ("A new start for Hopkins," Dec. 9). I only hope they make good on their promise this time. All that is left of the townhome that held such fond memories for my family when I was growing up is a fenced-in, empty lot. Sitting in the shadows of Johns Hopkins Hospital is the church where I have been a member since childhood.
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NEWS
February 4, 2014
In 2011, Maryland's state government was facing significant budget challenges in both the short term and the long term. The lingering effects of the recession and the waning of federal stimulus funds had blown a hole of about $1.6 billion in the state's general fund budget for the next year. And the stock market crash coupled with a history of under-investment had caused a precipitous drop in the levels of funding for the state's employee pension systems, meaning big liabilities for the state in the decades ahead.
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NEWS
October 11, 2012
The headline on Jules Witcover's recent op-ed ("Pressure is on Obama," Oct. 9) should have been "Obama committee member speaks out. " Is he serious that the dog on the roof incident is still a topic for discussion? Mr. Witcover spends the first half of the article making points against Mitt Romney and his faults. I'm sure if Mr. Romney said that we would have prisoners out of Guantanamo Bay in a year, or that all committee meetings would be on C-Span, or that all bills would be on the Internet for three days before he voted on them, or that he would cut the deficit in half or we could vote him out of office, that he would have brought those items up also.
NEWS
April 30, 2013
When I read The Sun's editorial summing up George W. Bush's presidency as "lousy," I couldn't help but wonder how the editorial board will assess President Barack Obama's service to our country ("Misoverestimating Bush," April 28). To date, Mr. Obama's presidency has been marred by scandal after scandal, broken promises, and profligate spending resulting in the largest deficit this country has ever seen. Let's hope The Sun can be as honest about Mr. Obama's legacy as they think they were about Mr. Bush's.
NEWS
April 4, 1995
The only people more gullible than those who will return to see major league baseball games in person are those who believe people won't return to the stands at all.Those "rebels" who organized protest coalitions, those legions of fans who called up talk shows to vow their revenge on the game, those millions of disenchanted aficionados who muttered how millionaire spoiled-brat players and greedy owners wouldn't get their hard-earned money -- the majority of...
NEWS
March 29, 1995
Clay Street in Annapolis is littered with broken promises.In the 1950s, the neighborhood was the center of black life in Annapolis. Billie Holiday and Cab Calloway played at the Dixie Hotel. Residents stood in line on Friday nights to get into the Star Theater. Black-owned shoeshine shops, groceries and law offices lined the street. Then in the 1970s, when the neighborhood was starting to look rundown, the government promised to give it some help. Using federal urban renewal money, the government tore down 142 buildings and moved 114 families across town to new subsidized housing complexes.
NEWS
By Elie Wiesel | March 5, 1993
IN addition to everything else, this tale is about lies, misleading pledges and broken promises.It began, for me, last summer when I received a letter from President Dobrica Cosic of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, inviting me to head a commission of inquiry into the prison camps in his tormented land.preparation for the mission, representatives of the World Jewish Congress and I met with Mr. Cosic in London during an international conference on Yugoslavia.At my urging, he appealed to Radovan Karadzic, Bosnia's Serbian leader, to close prison camps in his territory.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 25, 1993
WACO, Texas -- An FBI agent criticized Branch Davidian leader David Koresh yesterday for leaving a trail of broken promises in the effort to bring a peaceful end to the standoff at his cult's heavily armed compound."
NEWS
By Donna Koros Stramella and Donna Koros Stramella,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 5, 2000
THE SOUNDS OF broken promises were already echoing just past midnight in Glen Burnie. After my family had rung in the new year with a large crowd at a dinner-concert affair, we decided to head home. A half-dozen revelers had gathered outside -- not to bang pots and pans or watch the fireworks, but rather to grab a quick cigarette. Knowing how a large number of Americans name "quitting smoking" as a new year's resolution, I wondered how many of those smokers were breaking their promises just 10 minutes into Y2K. I heard an assortment of good intentions this year, ranging from "being more patient with my kids," to "find a new job."
NEWS
August 30, 1993
Todd Smith is tired of the Mass Transit Administration's broken promises, and, frankly, the Intrepid Commuter can't blame him.Last week, the 26-year-old Elkridge resident rode the MTA's Maryland Rail Commuter (MARC) train to an Orioles game at Camden Yards with humiliating results.Mr. Smith has spina bifida, a congenital disorder of the nervous system that causes paralysis of the legs. He uses a wheelchair.So three months -- count 'em, three months -- before he was scheduled to take a MARC train from the Savage station, he reserved a wheelchair lift.
NEWS
December 27, 2012
Given Johns Hopkins disappointing record for successfully rebuilding communities, I found it interesting to read the institution will invest $10 million to rebuild the Homewood community ("A new start for Hopkins," Dec. 9). I only hope they make good on their promise this time. All that is left of the townhome that held such fond memories for my family when I was growing up is a fenced-in, empty lot. Sitting in the shadows of Johns Hopkins Hospital is the church where I have been a member since childhood.
NEWS
October 11, 2012
The headline on Jules Witcover's recent op-ed ("Pressure is on Obama," Oct. 9) should have been "Obama committee member speaks out. " Is he serious that the dog on the roof incident is still a topic for discussion? Mr. Witcover spends the first half of the article making points against Mitt Romney and his faults. I'm sure if Mr. Romney said that we would have prisoners out of Guantanamo Bay in a year, or that all committee meetings would be on C-Span, or that all bills would be on the Internet for three days before he voted on them, or that he would cut the deficit in half or we could vote him out of office, that he would have brought those items up also.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | July 21, 2008
One after another, like line drives up the middle, reminders keep coming of what the Orioles' starting rotation could have been and what it has turned out to be. Saturday afternoon: Adam Loewen's pitching career comes to an abrupt, painful and heartbreaking end. Saturday evening: Daniel Cabrera falls behind the Detroit Tigers 6-0 in the first inning. Yesterday afternoon: Brian Burres struggles through 5 1/3 innings against the Tigers, throwing 108 pitches and giving up three runs - relatively speaking for this staff lately, a gem. Of course, the Orioles managed to win despite Cabrera's reversion to form - and lost yesterday when the offense managed all of three hits.
NEWS
By THOMAS F. SCHALLER | April 4, 2007
"Help is on the way." That's what presidential candidate George W. Bush promised our military seven years ago. Of all the broken promises of the Uniter-Not-Divider's 2000 campaign of mass deception, this has to be the most shameful, because our military, though still the strongest in the world, is under severe duress. Strains can be seen almost everywhere you look. Before he left his position as Army chief of staff last month, Gen. Peter J. Schoomaker told the Senate Armed Services Committee that our troops in the field are underserved because of a lack of support personnel, such as translators.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | April 19, 2006
CHICAGO -- When Republican Helen Chenoweth ran for Congress in Idaho in 1994, she not only endorsed term limits on members but pledged she would leave Washington after three terms no matter what. But something strange happened in 2000, when it was time for Ms. Chenoweth to step down: She did it. What was she thinking? In 2000, when Republican Timothy V. Johnson ran for Congress in a central Illinois district, he promised he would serve a maximum of six years. Voters may have been skeptical, since Mr. Johnson had spent the previous 24 years in the Illinois General Assembly, but he was adamant.
SPORTS
December 17, 2005
Tejada shines light on broken promises Kudos to Miguel Tejada for questioning the Orioles' true motivation after another offseason of broken promises. In each of the past eight years, The Great Impostor, Peter Angelos, personally guaranteed Orioles fans that the team would do everything in its power to return to respectability. Orioles fans actually bought into that meaningless claptrap, expecting the impossible to happen. And now the joke is on Tejada! Having no desire to compete with the Yankees and the Red Sox, Angelos is content to annually put a slapdash team together, relying chiefly on retreads and unproven youngsters.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk | December 27, 1991
New Year's resolutions: Where would we be without those lists of improvements and lifestyle changes?Go on a diet. Start exercising. Quit smoking. Reduce stress. Spend less. Save more. The lists are as varied as the individuals who draw them up.Over the years, my personal list has included all of the above, plus quite a few more.But all too soon, the list prominently posted on the refrigerator door Jan. 1 ceased to have a coveted place -- or much significance. It yellowed and was replaced by more pressing information, like permission slips, appointment cards and school newsletters.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 24, 2004
Legendary author Ralph Ellison called it the "blues impulse" - an artist's inclination to revisit the details of painful episodes in hopes of transcending the drama. The end of a love affair - broken promises, nights with no sleep - inspires some of the deepest blues. And Melissa Etheridge knows them all too well. If you stripped away the folk and rock elements of her early records, you'd find the most basic American musical expression, a penetrating feeling - real, jagged and aching. But these days, Etheridge, who will play a four-night stint at D.C.'s 9:30 Club starting tomorrow night, is no longer blue.
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