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Brokeback Mountain

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NEWS
By MILES CHRISTIAN DANIELS | December 15, 2005
In case you've been hunkered down on Mount Kenya, Brokeback Mountain opened last weekend. No hurricanes destroyed Orlando. No meteorites were reported in Los Angeles. In fact, the film quietly attracted huge crowds in New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco and will premiere in other markets this weekend. And so it seems Ang Lee's film about two cowboys in love is - at minimum - surviving. Why is a question we'll have to figure out later. Could be that all three opening cities have hefty gay populations.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | July 13, 2008
Heath Ledger died at an age when many gifted actors first reach liftoff. At 28, he had achieved acclaim, popularity and riches. But he was just beginning to define himself as an actor and a star. In Todd Haines' I'm Not There (2007), he played a tortured big-screen idol, ill at ease with conventional accomplishment and fame, in the manner of Bob Dylan - or James Dean.
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NEWS
By RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ | November 27, 2005
NEW YORK-- --Heath Ledger is driving me home. Movie stars don't usually drive journalists anywhere, especially distances that require knowledge of rules of New York streets. But this Brooklyn transplant of five months powers his car - a blue BMW - with the leisurely assurance of a cowboy on the range. The star of Brokeback Mountain, set for release in Baltimore on Jan. 6, Ledger is slung back in his seat, his long legs stretched out in ratty jeans, a hood pulled over his dusty brown hair.
NEWS
April 2, 2006
9 TO 5 / / 20th Century Fox / $19.98 Certainly you will remember the clothes. The hemlines, the shoes, the poofy shoulders, the poofy hair. The year, 1980, will come rushing back at you in the fashions worn by stars Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin and Dolly Parton, who clearly had a rollicking good time making this working-girl movie 25 years ago. 9 to 5 is the story of three women trapped in "the pink-collar ghetto" of a corporation. They form a reluctant alliance to get their "sexist, egotistical, lying, hypocritical, bigoted" boss, played by Dabney Coleman.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | December 30, 2005
If the all-too-sane and tasteful Brokeback Mountain has whet your appetite for a gay cowboy movie, go out now and rent or buy Howard Hawks' magnificent Red River. Hawks couldn't resist toying with the emotions churning at the core of a homosocial world like that of cattle hands, and he sent these feelings hurtling to the surface in one hilarious milestone scene. John Ireland plays gunman Cherry (!) Valance. After he signs up to help Tom Dunson (John Wayne) bring off the first cattle drive from Texas to Missouri, he immediately engages Dunson's foster son and right-hand man, Matt Garth (Montgomery Clift)
FEATURES
By JOHN HORN AND SUSAN KING and JOHN HORN AND SUSAN KING,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 1, 2006
This time, the medium was the message. Oscar voters couldn't have put it more clearly. Even as the big studios increasingly eliminate thoughtful dramas, five overtly political message movies were nominated yesterday for the best-picture Academy Award, as Brokeback Mountain, which went in the favorite, picked up eight nominations to take the lead. Without a mass-appeal blockbuster in the bunch, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences members singled out Capote, Crash, Munich and Good Night, and Good Luck, in addition to Brokeback - movies that delve into everything from racial intolerance to terrorism to homophobia.
NEWS
By BALTIMORESUN.COM STAFF | January 31, 2006
Complete list of nominees of the 78th annual Academy Awards. Best Picture "Brokeback Mountain," Diana Ossana and James Schamus, producers "Capote," Caroline Baron, William Vince and Michael Ohoven, producers "Crash," Paul Haggis and Cathy Schulman, producers "Good Night, and Good Luck," Grant Heslov, producer "Munich," Kathleen Kennedy, Steven Spielberg and Barry Mendel, producers Actor Philip Seymour Hoffman, "Capote" Terrence Howard, "Hustle &...
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 6, 2006
Hollywood -- Crash, a film that suggests America has far to go to become a true racial melting pot, upset heavily favored Brokeback Mountain in being named the best picture of 2005 at last night's 78th annual Academy Awards ceremonies. The film, whose characters clash along racial lines, also earned Oscars for Paul Haggis and Bobby Moresco's original screenplay and Hughes Winborne's editing. Haggis, also director and a producer of Crash, admitted he was "shocked" when his film was announced as best picture instead of Brokeback Mountain.
FEATURES
By SUSAN KING and SUSAN KING,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 13, 2005
Brokeback Mountain continues to be the dominant force early in this movie awards season, being named yesterday as best picture of 2005 by the New York Film Critics Circle. The Western chronicling the love affair between two cowboys also won best director for Ang Lee and best actor for Heath Ledger. Over the weekend, Brokeback Mountain was chosen as the year's best film by the Los Angeles Film Critics Association, earned top honors from the American Film Institute and also garnered the lion's share of nominations from the Broadcast Film Critics Association.
FEATURES
By MATEA GOLD and MATEA GOLD,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 14, 2005
Brokeback Mountain, a film by Ang Lee about the forbidden love between two cowboys in 1960s Wyoming, emerged yesterday as the front-runner in the Golden Globe competition with seven nominations from the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, including nods for best dramatic movie, best director and best screenplay. Heath Ledger's performance as the taciturn Ennis Del Mar earned him a nomination for best actor in a dramatic movie and Michelle Williams - who plays his wife - was nominated for best supporting actress.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW & CHRIS KALTENBACH and MICHAEL SRAGOW & CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITICS | March 31, 2006
Capsules by Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach. Full reviews at baltimoresun.com/movies. Aquamarine -- is a movie only 14-year-old girls can love. Claire (Emma Roberts) and Hailey (Joanna Levesque) are bumming. Hailey's mom has landed a dream job in Australia. Then a storm deposits a mermaid (Sara Paxton) in their Florida pool. She must find someone to love her in three days or marry her father's pick. For their help, she'll trade one wish. But the boy Aquamarine wants is Raymond (Jake McDorman)
NEWS
By PAUL MOORE | March 12, 2006
The Sun's senior film critic, Michael Sragow, can drive some readers to distraction with his challenging and uncompromising reviews. In 2005, he panned three of the five best-picture Oscar nominees: Munich, Brokeback Mountain and Crash, the last of which won best picture at the 78th annual Academy Awards last Sunday. In his analysis Monday of this drama about the racial and cultural divisions in contemporary Los Angeles, Sragow called Crash's co-producer's acceptance speech "high-flown spin on a movie about racism that was pretty much a two-hour hatefest.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | March 10, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Fate is indeed fickle. Who would have guessed that in this year's Oscar voting, Brokeback Mountain, a fine risky movie about a gay love affair, would surge ahead of Capote, a movie about a gay celebrity journalist, only to be edged out for the best-movie Oscar by a fine, yet risky, movie about racism? Is this a sign of our times or what? If conservatives needed any evidence that liberal impulses have taken over the motion picture academy, this is it. Right? But, alas, in some folks' minds, every silver lining has its cloud.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 6, 2006
Hollywood -- Crash, a film that suggests America has far to go to become a true racial melting pot, upset heavily favored Brokeback Mountain in being named the best picture of 2005 at last night's 78th annual Academy Awards ceremonies. The film, whose characters clash along racial lines, also earned Oscars for Paul Haggis and Bobby Moresco's original screenplay and Hughes Winborne's editing. Haggis, also director and a producer of Crash, admitted he was "shocked" when his film was announced as best picture instead of Brokeback Mountain.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 5, 2006
Santa Monica, Calif. -- Brokeback Mountain won big at yesterday's Independent Spirit Awards, setting the stage for what could be a great weekend for director Ang Lee's gay-cowboy drama. The movie stars Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal as 1960s ranch hands who fall in love atop a Wyoming mountain one summer, then spend their lives alternately reveling in and concealing that love. The movie, which is up for eight Oscars tonight, won the best feature Spirit, and Lee won for his direction.
TRAVEL
By ALAN SOLOMON and ALAN SOLOMON,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 12, 2006
There is no Brokeback Mountain. That doesn't mean people won't pay to see it. The mountain, like the Annie Proulx short story in the New Yorker (and later in a book) that spawned a much-honored motion picture bearing the name, is fictional. Proulx placed it somewhere in Wyoming's Bighorn Mountains. The movie's director, Ang Lee -- because it was cheaper -- shot the film in Alberta, along the Canadian Rockies, primarily in the Kananaskis Country area near Banff National Park. If you film it, people come.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 1, 2006
Brokeback Mountain's domination of this year's Oscar nominations - it received eight, more than any other film - doesn't merely make it the movie to beat at next month's Academy Awards. It also lends credence to its growing reputation as a cultural touchstone, a film whose significance transcends measures of critical popularity or box-office success. Like few popular films before it, Brokeback - the story of two 1960s-era cowboys who fall in love atop a lonely Wyoming mountain and spend the ensuing years simultaneously hiding and luxuriating in their shared passion - focuses on homosexual relationships and accepts them as part of American culture.
FEATURES
By GREG MORAGO and GREG MORAGO,THE HARTFORD COURANT | November 15, 2005
Today's best actors have to go the extra mile for their craft. Joaquin Phoenix had to learn to sing and play the guitar like Johnny Cash for Walk the Line. David Strathairn puffed as many as 50 cigarettes a day for his role as Edward R. Murrow in Good Night, and Good Luck. Philip Seymour Hoffman had to mince and develop a high-pitched voice for his role as Truman Capote in Capote. And Jake Gyllenhaal? He had to make out with Heath Ledger for Brokeback Mountain. It's that kiss -- two of Hollywood's hottest actors in an intense lip lock -- that has the movie biz buzzing.
NEWS
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN REPORTER | February 12, 2006
Is too much fuss being made over Brokeback Mountain? Ang Lee's film, forever saddled with the description "gay cowboy movie" (they're really sheep ranch hands), already has a slew of awards and the most Oscar nominations of any other contender this year. It's the subject of talk shows, late night TV monologues, essays. The movie poster has been parodied endlessly. One of the lines in the script - "I wish I knew how to quit you" - already has a life outside the screenplay. Hailed as a breakthrough movie in some corners, a flawed piece of filmmaking or agenda-driven attack on American values in others, Brokeback has seized the public consciousness as no previous gay-theme movie ever has. Based on a short story by Annie Proulx, the movie tells the tale of Ennis and Jack, two guys who know something about ranching, but not much about themselves, when they are brought together by a job in 1963, spending weeks on a mountain tending to a sheep herd.
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