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NEWS
November 17, 2004
GENERAL Motors' Broening Highway plant was not just a manufacturing facility, it provided a path to a better life for generations of very hard-working Baltimoreans. For almost 70 years, legions of workers -- as many as 7,000 at a time -- labored there making vehicles, their solid paychecks and pensions rippling through and strengthening this region's economy. But with an aged plant producing the 20-year-old line of Chevy Astro and GMC Safari vans at a quarter of its capacity, GM's announcement yesterday of Broening's 2005 closing was long expected.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
A man was stabbed to death in the Broening Manor section of Southeast Baltimore Tuesday morning, police said. The victim was identified Wednesday as William Harold Simmons, 49, of Dundalk. Police were called just after 6 a.m. to the 1700 block of Kane Street, for a report of a man lying unconscious in the street, police said. They found Simmons suffering from multiple stab wounds, and he was taken to a hospital, where he died. No suspect or motive information was released.
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NEWS
August 29, 2004
On August 25, 2004, BEATRICE S. (nee Shepherd) BROENING, age 76, of Stephens City, VA, formerly of Baltimore, beloved wife of Frederick L. Broening, devoted mother of Janet Marie Broening, Frederick Lyman Broening, Jr., James Shepherd Broening and the late Linda Jeanne Broening, grandmother of Bruce Bran R. Handley, great-grandmother of Brynn Arcadia Handley. Services and Interment private. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the Winchester Medical Center (Winchester, VA) c/o The Coronary Care Unit.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2013
A portion of Broening Highway will be closed this weekend for utility construction work and motorists are urged to use alternate routes, the city transportation department said. The closure to through traffic will begin at 7 p.m. Friday, between Holabird Avenue and Dunhill Road with detours in effect. The roadway will reopen at 5 a.m. Monday. Local traffic will be allowed access to area businesses. The $27.1 million project, which will conclude in fall 2014, includes new lighting and upgraded traffic signals, repaving and reconfiguring the Keith Avenue ramp to accommodate two-way traffic.
NEWS
December 3, 2003
STATE AND LOCAL political leaders' journey to Michigan on Monday was a welcome show of bipartisan support for creative approaches to saving the more than 1,100 high-paying manufacturing jobs now at Baltimore's General Motors plant on Broening Highway. The future of the 68-year-old Broening plant is now so bleak that it requires the unusual specter of Maryland's leading bitter rivals - Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and his potential opponent in the next gubernatorial race, Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley - joining together in a lobbying campaign.
NEWS
October 13, 2003
GENERAL MOTORS recently ran two-page newspaper ads picturing 48 of the company's vehicles, "the best cars and trucks in our history." But several GM models weren't in the ad, among them the Chevrolet Astro and the GMC Safari - midsize vans made at Baltimore's Broening Highway plant. Local plant managers responded with a sharply worded internal memo, complaining of their products' "neglect." The memo notes that the vans' combined sales this year through September topped those of some well-advertised Cadillacs and Buicks.
NEWS
December 17, 1990
There's reason to cheer General Motors' intention to keep its Broening Highway minivan plant open as it begins a "downsizing" campaign to meet its competition in a trimmer, slimmer form. For despite the recent decision to lay off 300 of the plant's workers, the reasons that impelled GM to renovate it are still extant:* A cooperative work force. United Auto Workers leaders figured early on that they could keep Broening Highway open only by learning to work smarter and to team up with management.
NEWS
April 30, 1994
With prospects brightening that General Motors may add a third shift at its bustling Broening Highway plant, Baltimore's automotive future seems assured at least till the end of the century. The Chevrolet Astro and GMC Safari minivans made in Baltimore and only in Baltimore have carved out a lucrative market niche that is keeping area suppliers busy and Broening employees working overtime. All this adds an estimated $1 billion to the local economy.The surge in demand for Baltimore-made vans is part of an astounding nationwide comeback for the Detroit Big Three -- GM, Ford and Chrysler.
NEWS
January 28, 2007
The removal of pedestrian bridges at the General Motors plant will necessitate the closure of a portion of Broening Highway from 7 a.m. until 10 p.m. today, according to city transportation officials. The affected area runs from Keith Avenue to Holabird Avenue. Northbound Broening traffic will be directed north on Clinton Street, east on Boston Street, south on Ponca, and then back to Broening. Southbound Broening traffic will be sent west on Holabird, north on Ponca, west on Boston Street, south on Clinton Street, east on Keith Avenue, and then back to Broening.
NEWS
September 18, 1990
General Motors and the United Automobile Workers union appear to have worked out a formula for labor peace, and that is good news for the GM plant on Broening Highway and for the lagging Baltimore economy.With sales of minivans still holding up well in an otherwise soft auto market, the tentative national contract signed by GM and UAW all but guarantees steady jobs for the 3,700 employees at Broening and employment for 5,700 other Baltimore area residents tied to the operations of the GM plant, the city's second-largest employer.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2011
A 16-inch water main break near the front truck entrance to the Dundalk Marine Terminal closed some lanes of Broening Highway Thursday. The northbound lanes in 2700 block of Broening Highway were closed and both directions of traffic were shifted to the southbound lanes, said Kurt Kocher, a city Public Works spokesman. Crews will likely work until after midnight to repair the break, which occurred late Thursday morning, he said. Portions of the Marine Terminal will not have water service while repairs are made, Kocher said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2010
The proposed purchase of a 3.1-acre parcel near the Baltimore city-county line would help the county move its plans forward for an estimated $3.3 million Heritage Trail from Dundalk to the Baltimore waterfront. The County Council is expected to vote at its legislative session Monday on a $1 million contract to buy the land at the intersection of Riverview and Ralls avenues in the city. James G. Robinson, the property owner, has accepted the county's offer for the land, now used as a truck depot and temporary parking for tractor trailers.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2010
Carolyn Taylor, a retired General Motors worker, died of an apparent heart attack Saturday at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. She was 69 and lived in Northeast Baltimore. Born Carolyn Daveta Pitts in Baltimore and raised in East Baltimore, she was a 1961 graduate of Dunbar High School, where she was class salutatorian. She attended the old Baltimore City Community College and studied nursing. She worked as a home caregiver after high school. She then worked at the old Western Electric Co.'s Point Breeze Works.
NEWS
December 5, 2009
Parts of Broening Highway in Southeast Baltimore will be subject to lane closures today and Sunday. Officials at the Department of Public Works said that one lane, between Avon Avenue and Authority Drive (adjacent to Interstate 695) will be closed each day and night. The other lane will remain open to traffic. Alternating northbound and southbound traffic will be directed by a flagger. Officials said drivers should consider using alternate routes.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,arthur.hirsch@baltsun.com | September 19, 2009
Water gushed for hours Friday from a broken 6-foot-wide water main in Dundalk, flooding the communities of Turner Station, Logan Village and Water's Edge, swamping a shopping center, washing out a main road to the southeastern Baltimore County peninsula and stranding dozens inside and outside their homes. No injuries or deaths were immediately reported, but the Baltimore County Fire Department reported that two people were transported to the hospital with "minor complaints." Emergency crews used boats to rescue a few "people who went out in the water, which we asked them not to do," said Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. Dozens of homes were believed to have flooded basements, as water crested at heights reaching car door handles before flow stopped about 6:30 p.m., two hours after the pipe broke under a knoll between Dundalk Avenue and Broening Highway.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun reporter | April 20, 2007
For 71 years, the auto plant on Broening Highway churned out Monte Carlos and El Caminos and, later, Safari and Astro vans. But neither the Chevy nor the General Motors brands, nor any of their models will live on in the name of the new East Baltimore industrial park slated to replace the demolished van plant. Instead, its developers, who solicited help from the community in renaming the site, have settled on "Chesapeake Commerce Center," a nod to the purpose and geographical identity of the new park.
NEWS
November 26, 1999
GENERAL Motors' decision to keep its 64-year-old Baltimore Assembly plant operating four more years is a significant opportunity for state and local officials.It isn't yet cause for celebration: One shift of 1,200 employees may be eliminated, and the plant's fate beyond 2003 is uncertain. But with 2,600 jobs and an estimated $1 billion impact on the local economy, GM's Broening Highway plant is a major economic asset to the region.Its future has been up in the air for years. Previously, GM said it would wind down Broening's production of Chevrolet Astro and GMC Safari minivans at the end of 2001.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2000
In 1996, when General Motors closed its huge minivan plant north of New York City, about 2,000 workers scattered to the economic winds. One was Kevin Rogers, who went south -- to GM's aging van assembly plant on Broening Highway in Baltimore. Soon after he arrived, he sensed something familiar in the air. When they cut back the overtime, when they replaced the plant manager and began relocating top officials, when the floors started to look dirtier and when they started hiring temporary workers, he knew what was next.
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