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By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1998
When Edward and Richard Stanfield began milking cows more than 40 years ago, they never envisioned themselves as sprout farmers.But things have changed over the years. They began adding new lines of business to keep their Randallstown-area farm viable -- opening a lumber mill and a nursery business. Now they're into sprouts.The latest change is a direct result of the recent news of the health benefits of broccoli sprouts, a source of high concentrations of sulforaphane, an organic compound that spurs cells to produce cancer-blocking enzymes.
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NEWS
By ROB KASPER | November 9, 2005
Ugh! That was my first reaction to the news coming out of a meeting of cancer scientists in Baltimore that eating garlic, broccoli sprouts and fermented cabbage could be good for you. Several lifestyle questions about this diet also quickly came to mind. One was how could anybody get within 5 feet of you if you regularly ate that stuff? It would take at least a week's worth of mints to knock out the lingering sauerkraut breath. And what about garlic's way of, how shall we say this, "revisiting" you later in the evening?
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BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1998
Will an increasingly health conscious nation clamor for broccoli sprouts?Nothing would make Dr. Paul Talalay happier. He is, after all, the Johns Hopkins University Medical School researcher who determined that broccoli sprouts contain high concentrations of sulforaphane, an organic compound that spurs cells to produce cancer-blocking enzymes.Now Talalay and the company he founded to ensure his discovery is properly exploited, Brassica Protection Products LLC, have a powerful marketing ally, the Sholl Group Inc., licensee of Green Giant Fresh, one of the country's most recognized vegetable food brands.
NEWS
By JULIE BELL and JULIE BELL,SUN REPORTER | November 1, 2005
No one has proved that garlic wards off evil spirits, but scientists meeting here on Halloween presented new evidence that it might play a role in preventing cancer. They also heard the latest findings suggesting that a diet rich in broccoli sprouts could reduce your chances of getting gastric cancer. Want another way to cut your risk of breast cancer? Consider three servings a week of raw or lightly cooked sauerkraut and cabbage. It's too early to say what all this means; scientists say much more research on diet and cancer is needed.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2001
A federal judge in Baltimore has invalidated the potentially lucrative patents that the Johns Hopkins University held on broccoli sprouts, ruling that the school and the company that markets the sprouts do not have exclusive rights to grow or sell them. U.S. District Judge William M. Nickerson, in a ruling published yesterday, invalidated patents that the university obtained for broccoli sprouts in 1998 and 1999 after discoveries by Hopkins researchers about their cancer-inhibiting properties.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1997
Have you taken your broccoli today?That notion, of consuming a "dose" of healthful food, got one step closer yesterday with a report from Johns Hopkins researchers that they've been able to identify a particular food source that packs a powerful wallop in terms of fighting cancer.The food is broccoli, and the dose is a few ounces a week of its sprouts -- a hitherto unused form of the plant that contains a large amount of the chemical sulforaphane, a potent compound that aids cancer-fighting enzymes in the body.
NEWS
November 2, 2001
EAT your broccoli sprouts and don't worry about whether they're legal. They're good for you, as taxpayer-funded studies have demonstrated. Now a federal judge in Baltimore has cleared the way for broccoli sprout growers to continue to sell their "health food" just as they did for years before Johns Hopkins lawyers secured U.S. patents on the vegetable. Researchers recently getting the patents didn't physically alter the broccoli seeds, invent a new variety or change the process of germination, District Judge William M. Nickerson Jr. ruled.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | March 11, 1998
Young broccoli sprouts upBroccoli sprouts are now available at local stores like Eddie's and Graul's. These are the embryonic form of broccoli that has 20 to 50 times more sulforaphane, a possible anti-cancer agent, than the mature plant. Use them in sandwiches, salads, stir-fries -- anywhere you'd use other sorts of sprouts. It isn't quite clear what constitutes a serving (presumably, the more the better), but price may be a factor. A small plastic container costs $3.59 at Eddie's.The zing of zahtarThe newest trendy ingredient on the food scene is zahtar, a Middle Eastern spice blend.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | November 9, 2005
Ugh! That was my first reaction to the news coming out of a meeting of cancer scientists in Baltimore that eating garlic, broccoli sprouts and fermented cabbage could be good for you. Several lifestyle questions about this diet also quickly came to mind. One was how could anybody get within 5 feet of you if you regularly ate that stuff? It would take at least a week's worth of mints to knock out the lingering sauerkraut breath. And what about garlic's way of, how shall we say this, "revisiting" you later in the evening?
NEWS
November 13, 2001
To combat cancer, sprouts must be nourished with care As the Johns Hopkins researchers who discovered broccoli sprouts rich in the anti-cancer compound sulforaphane, we are obviously gratified by The Sun's endorsement of the imperative to eat more vegetables, especially broccoli sprouts, to reduce the risk of chronic diseases ("Broccoli for the masses," editorial, Nov. 2). However, readers should be aware of certain facts: Broccoli sprouts were never sold by anyone prior to the announcement of our discovery in 1997.
NEWS
November 13, 2001
To combat cancer, sprouts must be nourished with care As the Johns Hopkins researchers who discovered broccoli sprouts rich in the anti-cancer compound sulforaphane, we are obviously gratified by The Sun's endorsement of the imperative to eat more vegetables, especially broccoli sprouts, to reduce the risk of chronic diseases ("Broccoli for the masses," editorial, Nov. 2). However, readers should be aware of certain facts: Broccoli sprouts were never sold by anyone prior to the announcement of our discovery in 1997.
NEWS
November 2, 2001
EAT your broccoli sprouts and don't worry about whether they're legal. They're good for you, as taxpayer-funded studies have demonstrated. Now a federal judge in Baltimore has cleared the way for broccoli sprout growers to continue to sell their "health food" just as they did for years before Johns Hopkins lawyers secured U.S. patents on the vegetable. Researchers recently getting the patents didn't physically alter the broccoli seeds, invent a new variety or change the process of germination, District Judge William M. Nickerson Jr. ruled.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2001
A federal judge in Baltimore has invalidated the potentially lucrative patents that the Johns Hopkins University held on broccoli sprouts, ruling that the school and the company that markets the sprouts do not have exclusive rights to grow or sell them. U.S. District Judge William M. Nickerson, in a ruling published yesterday, invalidated patents that the university obtained for broccoli sprouts in 1998 and 1999 after discoveries by Hopkins researchers about their cancer-inhibiting properties.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1999
The humble red tomato, that ubiquitous summer obsession of many a backyard gardener, is now the obsession of food and medical researchers.The reason: It might be a "superfood." That is to say, tomatoes, already delectable summer fare, might offer a powerful health boost as well.The potential medicinal properties of tomatoes and other possible superfoods are exciting scientists, who are increasingly convinced that the chemicals they naturally contain could combat, or even prevent, chronic and acute conditions ranging from high cholesterol to cancer.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | March 11, 1998
Young broccoli sprouts upBroccoli sprouts are now available at local stores like Eddie's and Graul's. These are the embryonic form of broccoli that has 20 to 50 times more sulforaphane, a possible anti-cancer agent, than the mature plant. Use them in sandwiches, salads, stir-fries -- anywhere you'd use other sorts of sprouts. It isn't quite clear what constitutes a serving (presumably, the more the better), but price may be a factor. A small plastic container costs $3.59 at Eddie's.The zing of zahtarThe newest trendy ingredient on the food scene is zahtar, a Middle Eastern spice blend.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1998
When Edward and Richard Stanfield began milking cows more than 40 years ago, they never envisioned themselves as sprout farmers.But things have changed over the years. They began adding new lines of business to keep their Randallstown-area farm viable -- opening a lumber mill and a nursery business. Now they're into sprouts.The latest change is a direct result of the recent news of the health benefits of broccoli sprouts, a source of high concentrations of sulforaphane, an organic compound that spurs cells to produce cancer-blocking enzymes.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1999
The humble red tomato, that ubiquitous summer obsession of many a backyard gardener, is now the obsession of food and medical researchers.The reason: It might be a "superfood." That is to say, tomatoes, already delectable summer fare, might offer a powerful health boost as well.The potential medicinal properties of tomatoes and other possible superfoods are exciting scientists, who are increasingly convinced that the chemicals they naturally contain could combat, or even prevent, chronic and acute conditions ranging from high cholesterol to cancer.
NEWS
By JULIE BELL and JULIE BELL,SUN REPORTER | November 1, 2005
No one has proved that garlic wards off evil spirits, but scientists meeting here on Halloween presented new evidence that it might play a role in preventing cancer. They also heard the latest findings suggesting that a diet rich in broccoli sprouts could reduce your chances of getting gastric cancer. Want another way to cut your risk of breast cancer? Consider three servings a week of raw or lightly cooked sauerkraut and cabbage. It's too early to say what all this means; scientists say much more research on diet and cancer is needed.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1998
Will an increasingly health conscious nation clamor for broccoli sprouts?Nothing would make Dr. Paul Talalay happier. He is, after all, the Johns Hopkins University Medical School researcher who determined that broccoli sprouts contain high concentrations of sulforaphane, an organic compound that spurs cells to produce cancer-blocking enzymes.Now Talalay and the company he founded to ensure his discovery is properly exploited, Brassica Protection Products LLC, have a powerful marketing ally, the Sholl Group Inc., licensee of Green Giant Fresh, one of the country's most recognized vegetable food brands.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1997
Have you taken your broccoli today?That notion, of consuming a "dose" of healthful food, got one step closer yesterday with a report from Johns Hopkins researchers that they've been able to identify a particular food source that packs a powerful wallop in terms of fighting cancer.The food is broccoli, and the dose is a few ounces a week of its sprouts -- a hitherto unused form of the plant that contains a large amount of the chemical sulforaphane, a potent compound that aids cancer-fighting enzymes in the body.
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