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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, for The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2012
Steaming, boiling and stir frying are the go-to cooking methods for broccoli, but oven roasting produces a much better result. Roasting broccoli brings out the muscle in the veggie by condensing the flavor and giving it crispy little browned spots packed full of flavor. This recipe is the missionary that will convert the holdouts from childhood who never became fans of these crunchy cruciferae. The trick to this recipe is keeping the broccoli dry. Wet broccoli will steam, so if it's not visibly dirty, skip washing it or wash and meticulously dry it. The garlic paste in the vinaigrette is slightly cooked by the hot broccoli, softening its bite.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
William Maughlin and "Downtown" Kevin Brown want you to have a good time and good food in Station North , a community they love. The duo behind the much-adored Station North Arts Cafe Gallery are following up that success with a second restaurant, Nancy by SNAC (as in Station North Arts Cafe), which opened last fall. Plans for a third Station North spot, a barbecue joint, are already in the works. Nancy is named for Nancy Haragan , the late founder of the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance . Given the arts connection, its location - within the Maryland Institute College of Art Graduate Studio Center on North Avenue - is an appropriate one. Nancy by SNAC is open for breakfast, lunch and snacks every weekday but for dinner only on Fridays.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette
The Baltimore Sun
| July 3, 2013
As the morning of our third-week pickup dawned, I pulled the Post-it notes off our refrigerator: We had done it. We'd successfully eaten everything from Week 2, except half a head of broccoli. On to Week 3! This week's share included turnips, beets, radishes, onions, carrots, lettuce, raspberries - and more broccoli. A huge, giant, enormous head of broccoli. Clearly, I needed a broccoli dish to take advantage of this bounty. I settled down with a stack of cookbooks and the pint of fresh raspberries, snacking as I rejected recipe after recipe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette
The Baltimore Sun
| July 3, 2013
As the morning of our third-week pickup dawned, I pulled the Post-it notes off our refrigerator: We had done it. We'd successfully eaten everything from Week 2, except half a head of broccoli. On to Week 3! This week's share included turnips, beets, radishes, onions, carrots, lettuce, raspberries - and more broccoli. A huge, giant, enormous head of broccoli. Clearly, I needed a broccoli dish to take advantage of this bounty. I settled down with a stack of cookbooks and the pint of fresh raspberries, snacking as I rejected recipe after recipe.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | November 4, 1993
She's been a stalk of broccoli, the Statue of Liberty and a pilgrim.That's Sandra Neuhauser's style. It's not pretty, says the second-grade instructor, but it works. During the last decade, she has used creative get-ups as teaching tools with her students at Winand Elementary School in Pikesville."I won't be in Vogue," says Ms. Neuhauser, 50, who lives in Randallstown. "But anybody can spend a lot of money on trendy clothes. . .The reason I do this is to impart to children an excitement about our world."
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | March 16, 1992
You'll find potatoes, cabbage or collard greens on Reginald Roseborough's dinner plate.But you won't find broccoli.Mr. Roseborough, a produce clerk at the Stop Shop & Save grocery store in Northwood Plaza, doesn't care if Johns Hopkins researchers believe they have found a potent, cancer-fighting chemical in broccoli and other related vegetables. He's not changing his eating habits.You can steam broccoli with butter, melt cheese over its greenish buds or serve the cruciferous vegetable with dip, but Mr. Roseborough isn't biting.
FEATURES
By COOKING LIGHT | March 12, 1997
In last week's recipe for African-spiced broccoli and cauliflower salad, the amount of broccoli was inadvertently deleted. The correct amount is 3/4 cup.The Sun regrets the error.The cruciferous vegetables of winter make robust salads that are good for you and flavorful. The problem with dark green vegetables like broccoli and Swiss chard is that they're so nutritious so much so, you can't believe how delicious they can be. Even their family name, Cruciferae, sounds daunting, as if they could help prevent diseases.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | October 18, 2000
THERE WAS A time when I agreed with George Bush. That was when he said broccoli didn't taste good. That was the vintage-edition Bush, the elder George. I bet he was commenting on broccoli that had some age on it. I say this because I have since learned that there is a major difference between the flavor of broccoli that is fresh from the field and the stuff that tastes as if it were picked back during the Kennedy administration. Fresh broccoli is tender, supple and packed with juice and flavor.
FEATURES
By McClatchy News Service | March 22, 1992
Your mother always told you to eat your vegetables, and now you know she was right -- especially since the report just issued in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal.Essentially, researchers now believe that a chemical prevalent in cruciferous vegetables -- a family that includes broccoli, cauliflower, kale, Brussels sprouts and greens (collards, turnips, mustard, etc.) -- could increase the production of sulforaphane, an enzyme known to put the whammy on carcinogens.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | December 26, 2007
Broccoli is good for you. Bacon tastes good. Recently, as I struggled with my usual resolution to become a better person in the new year, I whipped up a dish that combined both ingredients. Nutritionally speaking, broccoli has a lot going for it. It is loaded with vitamins A, C and K. It has good folate and manganese levels. Also, it packs those powerful phytonutrients, sulforaphane and indoles. This duo, according to information I read on a Web site called the World's Healthiest Foods, boosts the body's "detoxification enzymes."
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, for The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2012
Steaming, boiling and stir frying are the go-to cooking methods for broccoli, but oven roasting produces a much better result. Roasting broccoli brings out the muscle in the veggie by condensing the flavor and giving it crispy little browned spots packed full of flavor. This recipe is the missionary that will convert the holdouts from childhood who never became fans of these crunchy cruciferae. The trick to this recipe is keeping the broccoli dry. Wet broccoli will steam, so if it's not visibly dirty, skip washing it or wash and meticulously dry it. The garlic paste in the vinaigrette is slightly cooked by the hot broccoli, softening its bite.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2012
Debbie Housden from Baltimore was looking for a recipe for chicken divan that she said was published in The Baltimore Sun at least 10 years ago. Martha Socolar, also from Baltimore, said she too cut the recipe from The Sun many years ago and served it to her family for years, and they always loved it. Seeing Housden's request reminded her to start making it again. While I received many versions of chicken divan in response to this request, this was the very recipe Housden was looking for. It is interesting that this recipe, unlike the many others I received for this somewhat common dish, is relatively low in fat thanks to the use of skim milk, reduced-fat cream of chicken soup, and reduced-fat cheddar cheese.
FEATURES
June 3, 2012
Under some of my cabbage and broccoli plants there are ant hills. The stems look weak on those plants compared to others. Are the ants eating the plants? Ants don't eat garden plants, but a large colony can interfere with a root system and thus stunt a plant. While ants are helpful when they aerate the soil or churn the soil, bringing up nutrients from deep soil, you may have a case of too much of a good thing. Sprinkle diatomaceous earth on the ant hills. The sharp edges on this powder of fossilized diatoms should penetrate and kill enough ants to reduce the population.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2012
Asian Court could be the Chinese restaurant we've all been looking for. There's something for everyone at this unpretentious Ellicott City restaurant. If you're seeking well-prepared classic Cantonese and Hunan dishes made with fresh ingredients and careful attention, you'll be consistently rewarded at Asian Court And if you're on the hunt for the kind of cuisine we like to call authentic, you'll find plenty at Asian Court to challenge you. In fact, Asian Court helpfully lists these offerings, in English, in a menu section called "Authentic Cuisine.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 17, 2012
It's cookout season, which means plenty of temptations to indulge. But eatingwell.com s ays that there are ways to make picnic and cookout foods healthier. This weeks healthy recipe, broccoli salad, comes from their list. Eatingwell.com said it is creamy without all the fat. If you have examples of healthy recipes please send them to andrea.walker@baltsun.com and I will include on this blog.   Broccoli Salad INGREDIENTS 1 clove garlic, minced 1/4 cup low-fat mayonnaise 1/4 cup reduced-fat sour cream 2 teaspoons cider vinegar 1 teaspoon sugar 4 cups finely chopped broccoli crowns 1 8-ounce can sliced water chestnuts, rinsed and chopped 3 slices cooked bacon, crumbled 3 tablespoons dried cranberries Freshly ground pepper , to taste PREPARATION Whisk garlic, mayonnaise, sour cream, vinegar and sugar in a large bowl.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | April 26, 2012
Were you paying close attention during all those awkward “birds and the bees” talks and sex education lessons? If not it's OK, because you're about to go download a game for free (on sale from $.99) that will obliterate everything you would've picked up anyway. “Sperm Wars” is a sort of turn-based RPG where you fight other sperm cells for reproductive dominance. Why you're not trying to fertilize an egg is anyone's guess, but then again, this game was so confusing that maybe I didn't get that far. To start off, you're shown a map of the world that makes the game seem a little like “Risk.” For reasons unknown, North America is locked to me, and you have to choose “attacking” a territory off the coast of Africa.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | April 12, 1994
A chemical found abundantly in some varieties of broccoli appears to prevent or slow the development of breast cancer in laboratory rats -- new evidence that people may find a cheap and effective cancer-fighter on the produce aisle.The news gets better. While Johns Hopkins University scientists extracted the chemical from broccoli, it also occurs in Brussels sprouts, mustard greens, cabbage and other cruciferous vegetables.The finding, reported in today's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, adds strength to a widely heralded Hopkins report two years ago in which the scientists found that the chemical -- called sulforaphane -- raised the levels of a cancer-fighting enzyme in human cells grown in the laboratory.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 2, 2012
I interviewed Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer last year, and - let me put it this way - I can't think of anyone less qualified to replace Rush Limbaugh as a radio talk show host. Thoughtful, wise, a little dry and measured in his words, Justice Breyer seemed to be everything Americans should want in a judge. He betrayed no particular ideology during an hourlong conversation about the Supreme Court's role in our democracy. He politely refused to answer a question related to a case before the court.
NEWS
April 6, 2012
Thanks to Dan Rodricks for shining the spotlight on that annoying expression, "spot on" ("Razing the JFX, lowering O's expectations," April 2). It is a British way of thinking that something can be perfectly correct, while in America we know that nothing is perfect. The ultimate irony is that the "spot on" users are referring to Supreme Court arguments where neither side is perfect and a decision will probably be split 5-4. The broccoli analogy was a specious statement by Justice Antonin Scalia to oversimplify the argument and appeal to the anti-government movement.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 2, 2012
The Orioles have new orange and black banners along Russell Street and Pratt Street, and aren't they pretty, and aren't they grand, and shouldn't we be grateful? The banners proclaim "20 Years," and we're all supposed to understand and appreciate what that means - two decades since the fabulous, taxpayer-funded Oriole Park opened at Camden Yards. But, who cares? It's been nearly 30 years since the Orioles were in a World Series, 14-soon-15 since they had a winning season. In the Angelos era of Baltimore baseball, pessimism springs eternal in the human breast.
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