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NEWS
August 26, 2003
John Walter Broadway, a retired Baltimore firefighter, died Thursday of congestive heart failure at Good Samaritan Hospital. The Northeast Baltimore resident was 60. Born in Ansonville, N.C., he moved to Baltimore as a child. He was a 1962 graduate of Dunbar High School and a member of its wrestling and football teams. After service in the Army, he earned a degree in physical education and played football at Morgan State University. He worked at the old Harry T. Campbell Co. blacktop plant in White Marsh and the Sparrows Point plant of Bethlehem Steel Corp.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Joseph C. Koenenn and Joseph C. Koenenn,Newsday | September 1, 1995
The 1995-1996 off-Broadway season has barely begun, and already producers are lining up for the handful of major theaters. Most of those houses are either occupied or already booked for the fall."
NEWS
By Melody Holmes and Melody Holmes,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2000
Broadway Towers, a former public housing high-rise at Broadway and Fayette Street, is scheduled to be imploded at 10 a.m. today. The 24-story building once housed hundreds of low-income families and most recently served as a senior citizen residence. "The building is just standing on structural columns," said Doug Loizeaux of Controlled Demolition Inc., which is doing the implosion. The frame and the bricks are all that remain of the structure. More than 200 pounds of nitroglycerin-based dynamite placed in 900 areas of the building are intended to send it toppling in on itself, Loizeux said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | January 25, 2007
Growing up, I remember the old folks saying, "Whatever it is, child, take it to the Lord in prayer. Prayer changes things." Elisabeth Withers heard the same as a church girl in Joliet, Ill. She knew early on that she wanted to sing, that there was nothing else she'd rather do. So for years she prayed as she formally studied her craft, eventually earning music degrees from Boston's Berklee College of Music and New York University. In just the past two years, Withers has experienced the manifestation of her prayers.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 12, 2001
THOSE WHO'VE noticed the evolution of the little Broadway barrio in Southeast Baltimore should not have been surprised at census news that the number of Hispanics in the United States has grown by more than 60 percent in the last decade, making them even with blacks as the nation's largest minority group. Small Latino groceries, shops, restaurants and storefront churches have been opening in Upper Fells Point for years, and particularly the last few. "Many of my customers are from Mexico," says Jorge Speede, a native of the Dominican Republic who moved to Baltimore from Washington three years ago to run the A&K Botanica grocery on Broadway.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Staff Writer | May 3, 1992
When you saw the lights -- 410 white bulbs spelling out "CITY PIER BROADWAY" -- you knew you were home.For years, almost nightly since the juice first surged to the sockets in 1914, the Broadway Recreation Pier lights were a beacon over a brown patch of Baltimore harbor separating Fells Point from Locust Point."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 6, 2008
NEW YORK -- At a recent performance of the all-black Broadway production of Tennessee Williams' Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Ramona Scott, 52, ran into a couple she'd worked for as a baby sitter almost 40 years ago. She saw another couple who had been friends of hers during the 1970s. Cat, which will be at the Broadhurst Theatre through June 15, was where everybody seemed to be. "A lot of my friends and family don't go out to plays," said Scott, a frequent theatergoer herself. "But when they hear of one that has a large black audience, they want to go and see it."
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | April 30, 1992
NEW YORK -- Broadway has roared out of its slump.Last week, 27 productions attracted more than 222,000 theatergoers, more than in any single week since Christmas 1981.These figures closed out a month in which Broadway attracted more than 830,000 theatergoers and box-office receipts were the highest of any four-week period in New York theater history, according to figures from the League of American Theaters and Producers.The total four-week take -- which reflects today's higher ticket prices -- was $30,108,322, more than $3 million higher than the previous four-week record, set in December 1989.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck | December 5, 1993
Title: "David Merrick: The Abominable Showman"Author: Howard KisselPublisher: ApplauseLength, price: 565 pages, $24.95 In 1961, David Merrick produced a Broadway musical called "Subways Are for Sleeping." The music was by Jule Styne, the book and lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green. But despite the efforts of this illustrious team, it was clear even before opening night that "Subways" was headed for disaster.This gave Mr. Merrick a chance to try a publicity stunt that had been in the back of his mind for years.
NEWS
By GREG BRAXTON and GREG BRAXTON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 21, 2006
She was already a big star, adored by millions. But when it was announced that she would make her Broadway debut this spring, the anticipatory buzz went through the roof. Ads with her name splashed in large, bold type popped up all over New York City. A mad scramble for tickets erupted. Fans squealed the moment she stepped on stage. Crowds mobbed her at the stage door, clamoring for autographs and pictures. And producers of the show rejoiced in their financial good fortune. But all this fuss isn't over Julia Roberts and her theatrical debut in Three Days of Rain.
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