Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBroadway Show
IN THE NEWS

Broadway Show

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
The chanteuse Josephine Baker was the toast of Paris during the Roaring '20s and 1930s. She was exotic. She was sultry. She was chic. She was the highest-paid pre-World War II entertainer in Europe. She was, above all else, sui generis. Her life is about to become a Broadway musical, aptly named "Josephine," that will open in late fall or early 2014. It will be produced and developed by Baltimore native Ken Waissman. Baker was, as the French say, the personification of le jazz hot , which she is credited with introducing to Paris when she opened Oct. 2, 1925, in La Revue Negre, a cabaret show she had taken abroad.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
For many people, summer officially arrives in Annapolis with the opening of Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre - which usually coincides with the U.S. Naval Academy's Commissioning Week. That tradition continued May 22, as the troupe debuted its 49th season under the stars with the Broadway musical "42nd Street. " Based on the groundbreaking 1933 movie-musical, the show reveals the difficulties of backstage life for hardworking dancers during the Depression. The movie featured young singer Dick Powell along with relatively unknown Ginger Rodgers and Ruby Keeler.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Peter Marks and Peter Marks,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 2, 1996
Julie Andrews says that giving up the Tony nomination for her performance in "Victor/Victoria" was easy. It's doing "Victor/Victoria" that's hard.You try a dozen costume changes from woman to man to woman to man, sing a G flat powerfully enough to create the impression of shattering glass, run from one end of a stage to the other while three assistants wait in the wings with throat sprays and water bottles laced with Gatorade and dance the tango with Rachel...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Derek Chavis and For the Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Welcome back to the wonderful world of "Glee," folks. Let's start with the elephant in the room. You may have realized at some point that something was slightly off. Was it the fact that Artie, Blaine, Tina and Sam were still there? Was it the fact that prom was being talked about prematurely? Was it the fact that Rachel still didn't know anything about "Funny Girl" or that the episode never once addressed the fact that we had spent the last three months away from this lovable cast of characters?
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,[SUN THEATER CRITIC ] | September 10, 2006
"Let's take this show on the road." It sounds so simple, it's become a cliche. But in the most literal sense -- that is, mounting a touring production, also known as a road show -- there's nothing simple about it. For instance: What if the Broadway show that's going on the road is relatively small-scale -- like The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee or The Light in the Piazza -- but it's going to be performed in a gigantic theater? Or, what if, like Wicked, the show is so massive that moving it from one city to another is a major production itself?
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 5, 2003
Urinetown has gone down the drain. The Baltimore run of the hit Broadway musical has been canceled due to low ticket sales. It was to have played the Lyric Opera House Dec. 29-Jan. 4 as part of the new Broadway Show Club series. Ticket sales were running only $2,500-$3,000 a day since the on-sale date, Nov. 16, said William W. Becker, chairman of TheatreDreams, which created the series. He said the advance sale from club members, who pay $35 to receive ticket discounts and priority seating, was only $70,000- $75,000, versus $500,000 in Boston and $300,000 in Minneapolis.
FEATURES
October 2, 1990
NEW YORK -- By 9:15 in the morning, there were 67 people in line outside the Royale Theater on West 45th Street, around the corner from Shubert Alley and in the heart of that part of midtown Manhattan known as the theater district or, more specifically, Broadway. When the doors opened a little after 10, there were more than 140, all there with one goal, one dream: to get a job in a Broadway show.But this was not just any Broadway show. The show was "Miss Saigon," the hit London musical that has been the subject of much racial controversy in the last two months, and the audition was specifically for ethnic minority actors -- Asian actors, black actors, Hispanic actors, American Indian actors.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano | November 27, 1991
Is there any reason why "A Chorus Line" won't still be playing somewhere in the world in the 21st century? Having set a record as the longest running Broadway show with its amazing New York run from 1975 to 1990, this landmark musical is still generating globe-trotting touring productions.The company that opened at a nearly full Lyric Opera House last night marks the fifth time this self-described "singular sensation" of a musical has played Baltimore. Directed and choreographed for this tour by Baayork Lee, who originated the role of Connie on Broadway, the latest edition of the Michael Bennett-conceived show features a number of performers who are themselves "Chorus Line" veterans.
FEATURES
March 20, 2007
Only four contestants remain in You're the One That I Want!, NBC's reality TV show in which contestants vie to be cast as the leads in a new Broadway production of the musical Grease. National television exposure is rare for Broadway, and letting the public vote on casting its productions has never been done. But the TV show, which wraps up Sunday, takes its lead from How Do You Solve a Problem Like Maria?, a British program about casting a West End production of The Sound of Music. In Sunday's A&E Today section, Sun theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck will talk to David Ian, the creative force behind both television shows.
FEATURES
By Barbara Isenberg and Barbara Isenberg,Los Angeles Times | July 9, 1992
It helps sell tickets if a Broadway show on tour is packed with celebrities, but few major stars are eager to hit 30 cities a year.Ask Gary Beach, an actor who has traveled with such shows as "Annie," "Legends!" and "Les Miserables." "When you're in New York," says Mr. Beach, "you go and do the show. It's over at 10:15, and you're out of the theater at 10:30. By 11, you're sitting in your apartment watching 'The Tonight Show.' "Life on the road is a little less comfortable. "You're in a different hotel every other week, and you get very tired of restaurant food very quickly," says Cathy Rigby, who played 60 cities in two years as "Peter Pan" and this week begins a national tour in "Annie Get Your Gun."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts and For The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
Tonight on "DWTS," Victor and Lindsay are in jeopardy, but Jacoby and Karina live to dance another week. The show starts with a performance by someone Tom Bergeron assures me has been quite successful and has sold many records. His name is Olly Murs and I've never heard of him. It's weird how this show can go from making me feel young, hauling out older acts like Huey Lewis and Stevie Wonder, and then make me feel ancient with the performers I've no clue about it. Kellie & Derek are safe, as are Aly & Mark.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
The chanteuse Josephine Baker was the toast of Paris during the Roaring '20s and 1930s. She was exotic. She was sultry. She was chic. She was the highest-paid pre-World War II entertainer in Europe. She was, above all else, sui generis. Her life is about to become a Broadway musical, aptly named "Josephine," that will open in late fall or early 2014. It will be produced and developed by Baltimore native Ken Waissman. Baker was, as the French say, the personification of le jazz hot , which she is credited with introducing to Paris when she opened Oct. 2, 1925, in La Revue Negre, a cabaret show she had taken abroad.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2012
George Platt, a former New York theatrical producer who became a promotions director for a garden supply firm, died of renal failure Oct. 6 at Envoy Rehabilitation and Nursing in Pikesville. He was 90 and lived in Owings Mills. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of a grocer. The family lived on West Lanvale Street and on White Chapel Road in the Ashburton section of Northwest Baltimore. He was a 1940 graduate of City College, where he performed in shows. During World War II, he served in the Army Air Corps and was stationed in Calcutta, India.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brandon Soderberg | August 30, 2012
This week, "America's Got Talent," the only place on television left for freaks and oddballs that doesn't demand they have some strange addiction or possess a nickname like "Honey Boo Boo," gave in to the regular guys. Too many of the show's strangest semi-finalists got sent home. Host Nick Cannon explained that this time they would "announce the results differently," which meant this first group of 12 semi-finalists got put into groups of three and then the results were revealed to each group.  Once cut down to four, it would be up to judges Howard Stern, Sharon Osbourne, and Howie Mandel, to eliminate one of the four, sending the other three to the finals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2011
This has been a good year for Baltimore representation in the New York theater scene. In March, Trixie Little and the Evil Hate Monkey, the madcap acrobatic burlesque performers known for any number of adventures in Charm City, had their first off-Broadway show. This month, Michael Patrick Flanagan Smith, who directed some Baltimore ventures for that duo years ago, saw his play "Woody Guthrie Dreams" open off-off-Broadway. Although the Trixie/Monkey production of "All or Nothing" at the Ars Nova Theater was only for two weeks, a taste of it can be savored soon in an episode of "Unleashed by Garo" — that's fanciful fashion designer Garo Sparo — scheduled to air Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2011
Four decades ago, "Company" opened on Broadway, putting Stephen Sondheim firmly on the music theater map. The show left an indelible impression on a young person who saw the premiere in 1970. "I was taken to the show when I was 11 years old for my birthday," said actor and director Lonny Price. "'Company' has one of the best collections of theater songs ever. This show never gets old for me. It never disappoints me. " Back in April, Price directed a starry concert version of the Sondheim classic presented by the New York Philharmonic at Lincoln Center.
NEWS
August 3, 1998
The New York Times said in an editorial on Friday:Lights dimmed for a moment last night on Broadway, the theater world's way of honoring Jerome Robbins, one of the century's great choreographers. Robbins, who died in New York City on Wednesday at age 79, left his legendary imprint on every Broadway show he touched, on every ballet he crafted and on audiences who felt his untethered genius behind the athletic rumble in "West Side Story" or in "Watermill," a ballet executed with such exacting slowness that George Balanchine described it as being without time.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2011
William M. Baron, who tap-danced in a Broadway show with his identical twin brother and later ran a hat business, died of kidney failure Dec. 29 at Season's Hospice at Northwest Hospital Center. The Pikesville resident was 88. Mr. Baron, who appeared with his identical twin brother Wilbur, got a break when a talent scout recommended them for a Broadway musical comedy, "Best Foot Forward. " Director George Abbott cast them in the show choreographed by dancer Gene Kelly. The brothers appeared at the Ethel Barrymore Theater alongside stars Rosemary Lane, June Allyson and Nancy Walker in the 1941-1942 season.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.